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BULLETIN 

or TSB 

GEOLOGICAL SOCIETY 
AMERICA 



INDEX TO VOLUMES 21 TO 30 



JOSEPH STANLEY-BROWN, Editiir 



NEW YORK 
PUBLISHED BY THE SOCIETY 



s. 



282098 



WASHINGTON, D. C. 
PBESS OF JI7DD A DETWEILER, INC. 

1920 



jLLETIN of the geological society of AMERICA 
Index Vol., No. 3, pp. i-s26 November so, 1920 



INDEX TO VOLUMES 21 TO 30 



BY JOSEPH STANLBY-BBOWN 



{Prepared by direction of the Council) 



[Volame Indicated by black-face type] 



A 

Page 
Aa lava, Explanation of the formation of 24, 500 

, Formation of 25, 041 

— lavas. Chronological table of 26, 629 

Abbott, C. G., cited on solar radiation 25» 83 

sun heat 30, 541 

sun-spots' relation to i-liniatic changes 25, 485 

volcanoes and climates 30, 562 

volcanoes' relation to climatic changes 25, 483-484 

Abexdanon, E. C, cited on fringing reefs 29, 532 

Abich, H. ; A new island in the Caspian Sea, Reference to 22, 147 

Abitibi River limestone 30. 375 

Ablemans, Wisconsin, Cambrian sandstones at 27, 459 

Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, Twenty- 
seventh Annual Meeting of the Geological Society of America 

held at 26, 5 

,Vote of thanks to 26,110 

Acadian Triassic ; Sidney Powers 26, 93 

Accumulation of lead 28, H49 

AcKBOYD, W., cited on Dead Sea 29, 474 

Acbe, Geology of. -. 30, 224 

Acton, Lord, cited on majority rule 28, 246 

Ada MAN A, Arizona, Petrified log natural bridge near 21, 323-325 

Adams, F. D., Acted as toastmaster at annual dinner 25, 80 

— cited on allanite 28, 466 

anorthosite -: 29, 408 

gneissoid granites 28, 459 

magmatic assimilation 26, 261 

Adams, F. D., cited on nephrite syenite fields of eastern Ontario. . . 21, 91, 113 
pressure on cylinders of granite 26, 187 



4 J. STANLEY-BROWN INDEX TO VOLUMES 21 TO 30 

Pagpp 

Adams, F. D., Discussion of inaginatic differeutiatiou by 25, 261 

— ; Experiment in geology, Presidential address by 29, 82, 167 

— , An experimental investigation into tbe flow of diabase 21, 24 

— , First Vice-President, Presiding offlcer 21, 1 

— , Graphic method of representing tbe chemical relations of a i)etro- 

graphic province. : 26, 43 

— ; Investigations into tbe magnitude of tbe forces which are re<iuired 

to induce movements in various rocks under tbe conditions which 

obtain in tbe deeper parts of tbe earth's crust 28, 12r» 

— , Meeting called to order by President 29, 4 

— , Memorial of Alfred Ernest Barlow by 26, 12 

— , Presiding over annual dinner 21, 27 

— , and Dick, William J. ; Extension of tbe Montana phosphate dei)osits 

northward into Canada 27, 62 

Adams, G. I., cited on Philippine geologj' 28, 523, 531 

— , Delta deposits discussed by 23, 48. 746 

Adams, L. H., Acknowledgments to 28f 250 

Adams, M. K., Analyses by 27, 215 

— , Analysis of Adirondack rock by 25, 251 

ADAPiDiC and other Lemuroldea, Observations on; W. K. Gregory.... 24,153 
Primates, On tbe relationship of tbe Eocene lenuir yotharrtuJf 

to the 26, 419 

Additional characters of T>'rannosaurus and Ornlttiomimus ; Ifenry 

Fairfield Osbom 27, 150 

— note on Monks Mound ; A. R. Crook 29, 80 

Adh£mab, J. A., cited on gravitational attraction of glacial ice-body.. 25,223 
Adirondack anorthosite ; William J. Miller 29, 99, 399 

— Mountains, Glaciation In 28, 136, 543 

— Precambrian • 30, 155 

— region, Magmatlc differentiation and assimilation in 25, 45, 243 

, Petrology of 25, 244 

Adibondacks, Analyses of normative feldspar from 27, 216 

— , Analyses of syenites from ; 27, 214 

— , Early Paleozoic physiography of the southern 24. 72, 701 

— , Glacial lakes and features of 27, 65 

of the central 27, 645 

— , Iroquois water, and features of the country north of the 24, 218, 220 

— , New point in the geology of the 25, 47 

Affinities and origin of the AntUlean mammals ; W. D. Matthew. 29, 138, 657 
pbylogeny of the extinct Gamelidie ; W. D. Matthew 29, 144 

— of Hyopsodus ; W. D. Matthew 26, 152 

Africa (British East), Physiographic provinces and their relation to geo- • 

logical structure 23, 299 

— , Changes of climate in 25, 528, 541 

— , Inclosed lakes of 25, 563 

— , Petroleum supply of 28, 616 

— , Phosphate deposits of 30, 104 

— , Reference to climatic changes in 25, 482 



AFRICA AGE 5 

Page 
Afbica, Sauropoda and Stegosaums of Teudaguru of German East 26, 326 

African dlnocephalians' relation to American pelyc^osaurs 25, 143 

— (East) plateau, Physiography of the 28, 49, 297-316 

— mammals ; W. D. Matthew 23, 85, 156 

— Tendaguru formation. Age of 29, 653 

Aftonian beds, Composition and structure of 21, 124 

, Description of fossillferous sections 21, 126-139 

of Iowa, List of species of moUusks found In 21, 121 

— deposits, Area of 22, 207 

, Sioux Falls section 23, 146 

— , Evidence that the fossillferous and gravel beds of Iowa and Ne- 
braska are , 21, 31 

— fauna. Absence of carnivora in 22, 209 

, Fossilization and mode of preservation of 22, 208 

— fossillferous beds, Stratigraphic relation, Pleistocene section 21, 125 

— fossils, Description of plates showing 22, 216 

, Distribution of ., 21, 125 

— mammalian fauna, II ; Samuel Calvin 22, 66, 207 

, Correlation with other deposits 21, 120 

, Edentates 22, 215 

, Importance of 21, 120 

, Proboscideans (Elepbas, Mastodon, etcetera) 22,212-215 

, Rodents 22, 215 

, Ungulates (horses, deer, cameb$) 22,210-212 



— moUuscan fauna. Significance of 21, 121 

faunas, Modern moUuscan faunas compared \nth 21, 122, 123 

— sands and gravels. Mammalian and moUuscan remains in 21, 120 

— (sub-) of Chamberlin, "Albertan" correlated with 24, 564 

Agassiz, a., cited on Keweenaw series 27, 94 

— , A naturalistic model of a toix>graphic type first introduced into an 

American museum by 26, 80 

— , Reference to coral-reef memoire of 27, 333 

explorations by 25, 166 

views on coral reefs by 24, 78 

work of 28, 738 

AOABSiz, L., cited on Bethlehem moraines 27, 272-278 

coralline algae 26, 60 

glacial phenomena 27, 67 

glaclation in New Hampshire 27, 264-291 

— ; On the former existence of local glaciers In the White Mountninn. . 27, 264 

— , quoted on vegetable refuse on the ocean bottom 22, 222 

— , Reference to glacial theoiy of 21, 747 

AoASSiz, Mrs. Louis, quoteil on ant structures 21, 473 

AoASSiz, The beginnings of Lake 24, 71, (597 

— , Birds HUl esker and glacial lake 21, 4<J8, 413, 415, 421-424 

Age and origin of the red beds of southeastern Wyoming ; S. II. Knight 28, 168 
stratigraphy of the Pyrotherium beds of Patagonia, I'reliminary 

discussion of the 24, 52, 107 



6 J. STANLEY-BROWN INDEX TO VOLUMES 21 TO 30 

Fuse 

Age of American Morrison and East African Tenda^m formations; 

Charles Schucliert 28t 203 ; 29. 245 

certain plant-bearing beds and associated marine formations in 

South America ; E. W. Berry 29, 637 ; 30, 153 

mammals," Reference to Osbom's 23, 168 

Tendaguru formations discussed by A. F. Foerste 28,203 

the Don River glacial deposits, Toronto, Ontario; G. F. Wright. . 25,2(H> 

glacial deix)sits In the Don Valley, Toronto, Ontario; G. F. 

Wright 25, 71 

Martinsburg shale as interpreted from its structural and strati- 
graphical relations in eastern Pennsylvania ; F. F. Hintze 29, 94 

Red Beds of western Wyoming 26, 229 

— ■ points given by uranium minerals 28, 875 

Ages of i)eneplains of the Appalachian provinces ; E. W. Shaw 29, 575 

• the Appalachian peneplains ; E. W. Shaw 28, 128 

AiNsuE, Archibau), Rei)orts of observations of J. C. Gwilllm by 21, 369 

AiNSwoBTH, W. L., Acknowledgments to ; 28, 421 

AiB-BBEATHiNO, Diagrams sTiowlng possible mode of evolution of 27,432 

AiBY, G. B., cited on li>'pothesls of crust of the earth 26, 178 

Akabloouk pass, Alaska 23, 567 

Akebite, Comparison of syenite with 27, 206 

— ( Ilyi^ersthene syenite) of Blue Ridge region, Virginia . ., 26, 82 

Akebites, Analyses of 27, 207 

Alabama, Crystalline marbles of 26, 104 ; 27, 63, 437 

rocks of 30, 113 

— , Geological work In 26, 168 

— , Graphite deposits of '. 30, 112 

— , Oil development In 28, 625 

— pegmatite. Tourmaline in 1 29, 104 

— , Reference to Eocene shells from 26, 161 

Alaooas, Geology of 30, 225 

Alamooobdo, New Mexico, Deposit of gypsum and sand near 21, 647 

Alaska and British Columbia, Subalkaline coast range bathollth of.. 21,369 

Yukon, Differential erosion and equlplanatlon In portions of. 23,333-345 

— , Average elevation of mountain uplands In 21, 720 

— , Cambrian or pre-Cambrlan sedimentary rocks of 26, 187 

— , Canyon and delta of the Copper River In 24, 71, 699 

— , Carboniferous rock formations of ; . . 27, 19(5 

— , Correlation of the Cretaceous and Tertiary floras of 24, 116 

Trlasslc rocks of 27, 704 

— , Devono-Cambrlan limestones and dolomites of 26, 190 

— , Devono-Ordovlclan shale of 26, 195 

-^ earthquake of 1899, Date of greatest faulting of 21, 341, 342 

, Observers of 21, 345 

, Seismologists observing 21, 346 

— , Evidences of oil In 28, 678 

— , Glacial deposits of the continental tyi)e in 23, 44, 729 

— , Glaclatlon in 30, II5 



ALASKA ALBERTA 7 

Page 

Alaska, Glaolation in northwestern 23, 44, 563-570 

the uplands of the coast range, southeastern 21, 725 

— , Heights of Chugach Mountains and Saint Elias Range 21, 343 

— , Installation of magnetograph and seismograph at Sitka 21, 400 

— , Lake Iditarod region of 27, 114 

— . Map of harbor of Yakutat village 21, Sas 

showing minimum area of shocks felt, September 3, 1S99, earth- 
quake 21, 347 

.September 10, 1«)9, earthquake 21,357 

relation of mountain axes to earthquake origin in Yakutat 

Bay 21, 343 

— , Mesozoic-Pennsylvanian, Orange group of 25, 201 

stratigraphy of; G. C. Martin r 23, 36, 724 

— , The mountain knot of figure 3, showing 21, 203 

— , Occurrence of epicenters in 21, 397 

— , Ordovldan fauna from 29, 143 

— , Paleozoic glaciatlon in 29, 149 

— , Permo-Carboniferous ( ?) conglomerate of 25, 199 

— , Pillow lavas of 25, 619 

— , Pre-Cambrian metamorphic rocks of 25, 184 

— , Quaternary deposits of 25, 202 

— , Submarine tojwgraphy in Glacier Bay 25, 88 

— , Triassic rocks of 27, 119, 685 

— , Two glaciers in 22, 66, 731 

AiASKAN-YuKON bouudary. Geological section along the 25. 179 

, Igneous rocks of 25, 203 

• — , Paleozoic section of 25, 137 

Alaskan earthquake of 1899, Area disturbed by 21, 395, 396 

, Duration of 21, 341 

; Lawrence Martin 21, 23, 339-406 

, List of known observers and localities of 21,348,355,357,358 

, Location and date of known 21, 397-403 

, Location of area of 21, 343 

, Observations and descriptions of 21, 346-355, 356, 357, 359, 373 

, Other great earthquakes compared with 21, 403-405 

, Relation to other Alaskan earthquakes 21, 397-403 

, Results of 21, 341 

, Seismograph re(H)rds and studies by HeismologistH 21,374-38.3 

, Time records of 21, 388-391 

, Topography and geology of Yakutat region. Origin <if 21. 344 

— glaciers. Oscillations of ! 21, 20. 758 

AiATNA River and Valley. Alaska 23, 5r>6 

Albany Meeting. Register of 28, 175, 217 

Alberta Belly River beds equivalent to Judith River l>edn of Dog Creek 

and Cow Island, Montana. Evidence proving 26, 149 

— . Canada. Cretaceous of 27, 85, 673 

, Deposits and peneplain remnants in southern 24, 531. 566 

^ Interglacial beds at Lethbridge 24, 552 



8 J. STANLEY-BROWN INDEX TO VOLUMES 21 TO 30 

Page 
AiAEBTA, Canada, Pleistocene deposits on Belly River near Lethbridge. . 

24, 549, 550 

, Relation of mountain glaciers drift to Keewatin ice-sheet 24, 555 

— , Correlation of the Upper Cretaceous in 28* 216 

— oil fields 28. 725 

— , Post-Cretaceous floras of 26, 334 

— , Spiriferoids of the Lake Minnewanka section 24, 112, 233-239 

"Albebtan," name proposed by Dawson, Application of 24, 563 

Albebtella fauna ; C. D. Walcott 28, 209 

Albioiv formation 25, 280 

Alden, W. C, cited on argillites 30, 552 

beaches around head of Lake Michigan 21, 238 

Lake Michigan beaches 29, 235, 239 

— , Delta deposits discussed by 23, 48 

— , Discussion of geological history of the Bay of Fundy by 26, 95 

— elected Fellow 23, 3 

— quoted on d^)Osit8 of Milk River Ridge, Alberta 24, 566 

— ; Radiation in glacial flow as a factor in drumlin formation 22, 66, 733 

— , Pleistocene formations and "loess" discussed by 23, 48 

— ; Pleistocene phenomena of central Massachusetts 21, 31 

— , Pre-Wisconsin glacial drift in the region of Glacier Park, Mon- 
tana 23, 44, 687-708, 730 

— , Remarks on lowan drift by 27, 117 

— and Stebinger, Eugene; Pre-Wisconsin glacial drift in the region of 

Glacier Park, Montana 23, 687-708 ; 24, 71, 529-572 

Aldrich, F. H., Reference to southern geological work by 26, 163 

Aldbich, L. B., cited on clouds *. 30, 540 

Aleutian islands and Bering sea. Map showing habitual epicenters in. 21,397 

, The arc of the 21, 199-200 

Alexander, J. M., cited on Hawaiian Islands 28, 503 

AiiEXANDRiAN epoch in the Mississippi Valley, History of 27, 314 

— rock fossils, Analyses of 27, 316-324 

, Photograph of 27, 324 

— rocks in Illinois, Stratigraphy of 27, 306-307 

northeastern Illinois 27, 305 

of northeastern Illinois and eastern Wisconsin; T. B. Savage... 24,95, 

155 ; 27, 305 
the Mississippi Valley, Correlation with early Silurian strata of 27,312 

— series. Definition and inclusions 24, 351 

in Missouri and Illinois, Distribution of and authorities on inter- 
pretation of the strata of 24, 353-356 

, Stratigraphy and Paleontology. Part I ; T. E. Savage. . 

24, 111, 351-375 
, Stratigraphic relations and detailed stratigraphy of the 24,356,357 

— strata in Missouri and Illinois, Table of generalized section of. . 24, 375-376 

Wisconsin 27, 308 

Alg/E fossils from Colorado anp Utah 27, 159 

— in Ordovlcian dolomite. Coralline 24, 115, G07 



AhOM ^ALLEN 9 

Page 
Ajloa of the Ordovician iron ores of Wabana, Newfoundland, Fossil . . 26, 148 

— , Yellowstone Park and Algonkian 27, 156 

AixsAL and bacterial deposits In the Algonkian Mountains of Montana, 

Occurrence of ; C. D. Walcott 26, 148 

— limestone on the Belcher Islands, Hudson Bay ; R. S. Moore 29, 128 

AU90NKIAN algae : 27, 1^ 

— flora 30, TjOO 

— Mountains of Montana, Algal and bacterial deposits in 26, 148 

— , Rocks of the 25, 40 

— system of the Wasatch region 21, 535 

Algonkian and Iroquois beaches, Isobases of 21, 21, 227-248, 761 

, Relative ages of 21, 241 

lakes, Map of, figure 1 21, 230 

planes, Table for comparison of tilt rates of 21, 244 

— beach. Altitudes in the region of horizontality 21, 2,36, 237 

, Altitudes of 100 localities of the 21, 329 

, Remarkable deformation of the ; Frank Leverett 24, 71, 697 

, Stage recorded by the 21, 329 

, Table of elevations 24, 223 

, Tilt rates of the 21, 234, 235 

— lake, Map of, figure 2 i 21, 230 

— plane as a datum plane 21, 240 

, Isobases of the upwarped portion 21, 231 

— water-plane 21, 220-241 

Ai.isPHENoiD and Lachrymal in recent and fossil vertebrates. Homology 

of the 24. 118, 241 

Alkaune and subalkallne eruptives and calcareous setUments, Table 

showing field associations 21, 107 

rocks. Association of 21, 89, 90 

— igneous rocks at Cuttingsville, Vermont, The complex of (extempore) ; 

J. W. Eggleston 21, 32, 785 

— Plutonic mass. Areas of 21, 90 

— rocks, Association of limestones, dolomites, and other calcareous sedi- 

ments with 21, 91 

, Definition of 21, 87 

, General statement of the investigation of 21, 88, 89 

, genetically connected with subalkallne magmas 21, 90 

, Origin of the ; Reginald A. Daly 21, 87-118 

, Reference by Daly to 27, 328 

Allanite, Analyses of 28, 152, 473, 478, 489, 491, 493, 495 

— , Composition of 28, 480 

— , Distribution in the Rocky Mountains of 22, 122 

— , Distribution of 28, 467 

— . Megascopic character of weathered 28, 483 

— , Weathering of 28, 152, 463 

Allegheny formation of Maryland 30, 572 

, Typical section of the 30, 153 

Allen, E. T., Diopslde and its relation to calcium and magnesium 

metasilicates, Reference to 21, 166 



10 J. STANLEY-BROWN INDEX TO VOLUMES 21 TO 30 

Page 
AiXEN, E. T., Reference to accurate measurements of chemically pure 

pyrrhotite by .• . 21, 148 

— , R61e of water in tremolite and certain other minerals, Reference to 21, 166 

— and Day, Arthur L. ; Isomorphism and thermal properties of feld- 

spars, Reference to 21, 165, 166 

— , Wright, Fred. Eugene, and Clement, J. K. ; Minerals of the com- 

Ix>sition MgSiOs, Reference to 21, 166 

Allen, G. M., cited on West Indian mammals 29, 657 

Allen, J. H., Geological work in Florida of 26, 174 

Allen, R. C, cited on elliptical greenstone schists 26, 612 

Keweenaw series 27, 94-97 

Alling, H. L. ; Glacial lakes and other glacial features of the central 

Adirondacks 27, 65, 645 

— ; Some problems of the Adirondack Precnimhrian 30, 155 

Allorhynchus heteropsis (Winchell), Figure showing and description 

of 21, 509 

— macra (Hall) , Figure showing and description of 2I, 509 

— n. gen 21, 509 

Alluvial fan deposits of North America, Character and current bedding 

of delta 24, 401 

Altamont moraine, Sioux Falls section of the 23, 150 

Alteration processes and products within the Greenville limestone ; A. A. 

Julien 24, 76, 717 

Alternative explanation of the origin of the Saratoga mineral waters ; 

R. Ruedemann 25, 33 

Altitudes and warping in the Ontario basin 27, 243 

Amazonas, Geology of 30, 229 

Ameohino, Florentino, cited on dinosaurs 26, 401 

Amendments to the by-laws 21, 19 ; 22, 52 ; 26, 49 

constitution 21, 19 

America, Cenozoic floras of equatorial 29, 129 

— , Geologic work of ants in tropical 21, 450-496, 790 

— , Phosphate deposits of 3q^ IO4 

— , Record of storminess in 26, 499 

— , Tertiary Nassldie of west coast of 28, 227 

American area of storm shifting, Chart of 25, 512 

— arid region. Subdivision of 21, 544 

— Association for the Advancement of Science, Address by J. S. Diller, 

retiring Vice-President of Section 3 of the 26 111 

, Affiliation of Cordilleran Section with 26 132 

— Diphyphylloid corals ; George H. Chadwick 28, 208 

Geographical Society of New York, Assistance rendered by 2I, 339 

— Geological Society, Organization of 25! 160 

, Questions discussed of organizing 2i. 743 

"American Geologist" magazine. Publication of ^^* j^ 

geology, Sources and tendencies in ^^ jj 

— Lower Ordovicic formation 2^^ ^f^- 

— mapping in France ; G. S. Smith 3^' j^^ 



AMERICAN ANALYSES 11 

Page 
American Morrison formation. Age of 29« 245 

— Museum expedition to the Bridger Basin, Specimens found by . . 24, 249, 250 
of Natural History, Geological investigation directed by 25, 355 

— Philosophical Society, Overture from, on Antarctic exploration 21,25 

, Reference to proceedings of 22, 148 

— , Post-Glacial uplift of northeastern 29, 187 

— -Scenic and Historic Preservation So<'iety, custodian of John Boyd 

Thatcher Park 26, 110 

— Social Science Association, "Geographic sculpture" first honored in 

this country' by 26, 80 

— Tertiary bryozoa, Classification of 28, 204 

— topographer in the rOle of artillery orientation officer; F. E. Matthes. 

30,110 

— Triassic invertebrate faunas and their relation to those of Asia and 

Europe 26, 412 

Amuerstbubg, Ontario, Photograph of Andeiilon at 27, 72, 76 

pre-On(mdaga Jointing at 27, 74 

Ami, H. M., Clorrelation of Paleozoic faunas discussed by 23, 83 

— , Discussion of classification of aqueous habitats by 26, 158 

intraformational corrugation by 25, 37 

origin of Saratoga mineral waters by 25, 38 

— , Remarks on corals by 27, 147 

crustal movements in Lake Erie region by 26, 67 

evidence of recent subsidence on the coast of Maine by 26, 92 

— , Remarks on glacial erosion by 26, 73 

Guelph formation by 27, 148 

the origin of thick salt and gypsum dei)Osits by 26, 104 

Ammonoosuc glacier 27, 284 

— Valley and White Mountains, Outline map of 27, 263 

Amphibia>'s, Environment of early 27, 409 

— , Evaluation of causes in rise of 27, 414 

— , Rise of 27, 391 

— (Temnospondyte) from the Texas Permian, Principal character of 

the Chelydrosauria, a suborder of 21, 75 

Amphiboute schist, Occurrence of 21, 747, 751 

Amphiccelias, Camarasaurus, and other sauropods of C-ope 30, 379 

— from Cailon City 30, 151 

Amrden formation of the east slope of the Wind River Mountains of 

Wyoming and its fauna ; E. B. Branson and 1). K. Greger 29, 309 

W^yoming and its fauna ; E. B. Branson and D. K. (Jreger 28, 170 

AxACACiio limestone of Texas 27, 44 

Analyses of akerites 27, 207 

Alexandrian rock fossils. .• ' 27, 316-324 

allanite 28, 152, 473, 478, 485, 491, 493, 495 

feldspar composition of syenite from Adirondacks, New York, and 

Blue Ridge, Virginia 27, 216 

feldspars from Triassic diabase 27, 642 

gabbros 27, 229 



12 J. STANLEY-BROWN INDEX TO VOLUMES 21 TO 3O 

Page 

Analyses of hypersthene syenite 27, 200, 202 

limestone 28, 446-447 

normative feldspar 27, 200 

obsidian from Iceland, Tables of chemical 26, 260 

petroleums 28, 71i> 

pyroxene from Triassic diabase 27, 641 

pyroxenite 27. 232 

quartz monzonites 27, 205 

rbyolites from Yellowstone National Park 22, 113 

rocks of charnockite series 27, 218 

sea deposits 28, 937, 939 

syenite 27, 199 

(andesine anorthosite) of Virginia 27, 211 

syenites from Adirondacks 27, 214 

Triassic diabase 27, 640 

unakite 27, 222 

— — uranium minerals 28, 863 

waters of Yellowstone National Park 22, 114 

— , Table of chemical ". 27, 54 

Analysis, Lithophysie of the obsidian 26, 259 

— of Adirondack rocks 25, 250 

— — clastic sediments. Methods of 25, 657 

concretions ; L. J. Youngs 25, 79 

granites 25. 466 

oolitic sand of Great Salt Lake 25, 758 

Pennsylvania oolite 25, 767 

oolitic limestone 25, 758 

pyrotherium fauna ; F. B. Loomis 25, 140 

quartz rock and felsite 25. 473 

Qulncy granite 25, 466 

riebeckite-ffiglrite granite 25, 466 

Salt Lake water 25, 754-755 

Sokotra granite 25, 466 

Anatomy aiid physiology in extinct organisms ; Charles R. Eastman and 

Rudolph Ruedemann 21, 74 

Ancient Panama straits ; Roy E. Dickerson 28, 230 

Andean Republic of South America, Bibliography of the geological and 

geographical literature of the 24, 75 

Anderdon limestone at Amherstburg, Ontario, Photograph of 27, 72, 76 

Andebson, F. M., elected President of the Pacific C^oast Section of the 

Paleontological Society 24, 126 

— , Eocene of the Coalinga-Cantua district, California, diHcussed by. . . 24, 127 

— ; Fauna of the Oligocene ( ?) of Oregon 25, 154 

— , Miocene of the southern Coast Range region of California discusi^ed 

by 23. 72 

, Origin of sandstone near Carson City discussed by 23, 73 

— , presided at meeting 25, 150 

, Remarks on the Etchegoin of the Sargent oil fields locality by 24, 129 



ANDERSON — AN0RTH08ITE 1 3 

Page 
Anderson, F. M., Remarks on relations of the Martinez and Tejon by. 2S4, 127 

Anderson, J. G., cited on geology of Graham Land 29, 645 

— .Reference to "Ueber die Cambrtsohe und Sllurische phosplMritftih- 

rende Gesteine aus Schweden" of 27. 611 

ANDiatsoN, Robert, cited on California oil field 28, 565 

Monterey deposits 29, 299 

Stromboli 28, 267 

term monocline 28, 569 

Turritella andersonii beds 29, 293 

— , Earth-flows described in Science, new series, volume 25, 1907, page 

760, by 23, 491 

Anderson, Tumpest, cited on origin of pillow lavas 26, 610, 644 

Stromboli 28, 267 

Anderson's methods of photography in vertebrate paleontology ; H. F. 

Osbom 21, 75 

Andersson, J. E. ; '*Solifliiction a component of subaerial denudation," 

Reference to 23, 342 

Andes, Reference to 29, 620 

Andesine anorthosite syenite compared to hypersthene syenite 27, 209 

Andksites and their genetic associates 27, 327 

Andr£, Carl, cited on sea deposits 28, 738 

Andreae, a., cited on geys»or action .• . . 29, 185 

Andrews, C. E., cited on Australian plants 29, 616 

Ani«ews, C. L., cited on recession of Muir glacier 21, 368 

Andrews, C. W., cited on comparison of Sundance with Oxford clay 

formation 29, 258 

Andrews, E. B., cited on relation of oil to anticlines 28, 626 

rock oil 28,555 

Andrews, Edmund, cited on glacial time 29, 244 

Lake Michigan beaches 29, 235, 237 

Andrews, Ernest C, cited on barrier reefs 27, 45 

rate of denudation 28, 823 

Fiji 29, 504 

— , Reference to his paper "Ice-flood hypothesis of the New SSealand 

sound basins" 21, 720 

— et al., Ice-flood period named by 21, 718 

Andrusson, N., cited on sea sediments 28, 739 

Anoeun, N. p., cited on paleontologic subdivision of strata 27, 585 

Anglo-Parisian basin, Typical character of 25, 338 

Angular unconformity at Catskill ; George H. Chadwick 24, 50, 676 

Anhydrite and gypsum from the Ludwlg mine, Lyon County, Nevada; 

Austin F. Rogers 24, 94 

Animals feeding on termites 21, 477-479 

Animas formation 25, 338 

ANNE8, E. C, cited on Mesonacids 27, 185 

Annual dinner of the Society 21, 27 ; 22, 64 ; 28, 46 ; 24, 74; 

25,80; 2(8,104; 27,60; 28,136; 29.98; 80,116 
ANCHtTHOSiTE of the Adirondacks 29, 99, 399 



14 J. STANLEY-BROWN INDEX TO VOLUMES 21 TO 30 

Anobthosites discussed by F. D. Adams 28, 155 

H. P. Gushing 28, 155 

J. A. Dresser 28, 155 

L. C. Graton 28, 155 

— of Minnesota discussed by members 29, 99, 103 

— , Problem of the 28, 154 

Aj^t-eateb, Description of 21, 477 

Ant faunas of South America 21, 454 

— hills, Size of 21, 464-471, 482, 483 

— structures 21, 463-476 

Antarctic exploration, Overture from American Philosophical Society 

on 21, 25 

— land, Tertiary crustal movement on 21, 218 

— research, Resolution concerning 21, 28 

Antelopes in the fauna of the Rancho La Brea ; A. G. Ghandler 25, 155 

Anthony, H. E., cited on Porto Rico fossils 29, 659 

— ; Fossil mammals from Porto Rico 28, 209 

Anthracite coal fields, Some structural features in the northern; Ho- 
ratio Nelson Darton 24, 51, 676 

Anthozoa and the systematic position of Paleozoic corals, Evolution of 

the 26, 157 

Anthropoids, Phylogenetic review of recent and extinct 27, 149 

Anticlinal theory, as applied to some quicksilver deposits ; J. A, Uddeii 

30, 112 
Anticlinal, Generalized section of Gincinnati 28, 036 

— (local) in the Ghagrin shales at Gleveland, Ohio (extempore) ; Frank 

- R. Van Horn 21, 24, 771 

, Description of 21, 771 

1 Local geology of 21, 771 

, Probable cause of flexures in 21, 771 

Anticlines, Some instances of flowing wells on ; F. G. Clapp 21, 24. 770 

Anticosti and Mingan islands. Fossils of 21, 678-716 

, Geologic sequence in 21, 681 

■ , Ordovicic-Siluric section of 21, 677-716 

, Thickness and extent of Ordovicic-Siluric of 21, 678 

— formation. Relation of tlie Gatnract to the 25, 291 

— group, Hudson River Group and 21, 679 

, Niagara period and 21, 680 

— island, Bcatricea beds of 21, 697 

, Becsie River formation 21, 705-708 

, Chicotte formation 21, 715, 716 

, Cincinnatic system, Gamachian series 21, 700-704 

, Cincinnatic system, Richmondian series of 21, 694-700 

, Clorinda harrandii beds of 21, 705 

,Dinoholu8 beds of 21,696 

, Dinorthis porcata beds of 21, 701 

, Early Richmondian beds of 21, 696 

, Ellis Bay formation. Correlation of 21, 704 



ANTICOSTI ^APOTOSAUftUS 15 

Page 

ANTICOSTI island fauna ; W. H. Twenhofel 27, 311-312 

, First marked coral reef beds of 21, 702 

, Fossils of Ellis Bay formation 21, 702-704 

, Gun River formation 21, 708-713 

, Hormotoma giganiea beds of 21, 702 

, Hyatella congesta beds 21, 709 

, Jupiter River formation 21, 713-715 

, IiOng-ranf?ing species of, List of 21, 683 

, Oficoccra* futile beds of 21, 714 

, Ordoviclc fossils of 21, 694 

, Ordoviclc system. Correlation of 21, 694 

, Ordovlcic system, Macastey black shale of 21, 693 

, Parastrophia reversa beds of 21, 701 

, Pl(tnopora expansa beds of 21, 705 

, Rhynchonella fritiffilla glacialis beds 21, 710 

, Rhynchotrema perlamellosa beds of 21, 697 

, Silurlc system, Nlagaran ( Antlcostlan) series 21, 704 

, Stricklandinia lens beds of 21, 714 

succession, Systems of 21, 693-706 

, Table of strata of geologic section of 21, 684, 685 

, Triplecia ortoni beds of 21, 713 

, Zones and fauna of Ellis Bay formation 21, 701-704 

— section, Clinton formations In the 29, 82 

— strata, Divisions of 21, 679 

Anticyclones above continental glaciers, New evidence of the existence 

of fixed ; W. H. Hobbs 26, 73 

Antillean-Isthmian region. Symposium on faunal and floral relation- • 

ships in '. 29, 129 

Antillean mammals, Aflinlties and origin of 29, 138, 657 

Antilles, Flora of the 29, 129, 649 

Ants as food 21, 462 

— , Attacks on man by 21, 457-459 

— , Beneficial 21. 459-462 

— , Destructlveness of 21, 455 

— , Earth moved by 21, 493 

— , Geologic work of 21, 493, 494 

In tropical America ; J. C. Branner 21, 450-496, 790 

— of the Quaternary 28. 244 

— , Photographs of mounds in Brazil made by 21, 449 

— , Relations to the soil of 21, 474-476 

— , Termites or white 21, 476-496 

Apalachigola fauna from Lower California ; Ralph Arnold and Bruce 

L. Clark 28, 223 

Apatite-ilmenite gabbro 27, 228 

Apatosaubus, Skeleton In Carnegie Museum of 27, 153 

Aflite dikes of New York 30, 93 

Aplodontia group, History of ; W. P. Taylor 26, 417 

Afotosaurus, Description of a new species of 27, 151 



1() J. STANLEY-BROWN INDEX TO VOLUMES 21 TO 30 

Pace 

Appalachian Mountain region. Ancient delta deposits from 24,406 

, Detailed suct^essive deposits in 24, 410 

— mountains of Maryland ; Charles Swartz 21, 24 

— oil field ; M. U Fuller 28. 156. 617 

, Future of 28, 647 

, Map of 28,610 

, Structure of 28, 635 

, Wells drilled in 29, 96 

— peneplains discussed by R. A. Daly 28, 128 

Frank Leverett , 28,128 

— province, Ages of peneplains of 29, 575 

— region. Silurian deposits of the 28, 202 

— regions, Pennsylvania strata in 29, 97 

— , Piedmont terraces and post- Jurassic history of the northern 24. 70, 688 

Appalachians, Present and future of natural-gas fields in the northern . 

21, 34, 788 
Appabent limits of former glaciation in the northern coast ranges of 

California ; R. S. Holway 25, 120 

Appointment of Auditing Committee of the Paleontological Society. . . 29, 125 
Aqueofs habitats, A classification of ; Marjorie 0*Connell 26, 159 

— sand types, Description of 21, 632-638 

Arabia, Petroleum supply of 28, 614 

Arabian desert, Red sands of 21, 643 

Abapaiioe and Laramie, Erosion interval between , 26, 347 

— beds 26, 325 

— flora 26, 331-333 

Arch Creek natural bridge, near Miami, Florida, DescTiption of and 

view showing i 21, liSl 

Archwoscyphia minganesc (Billings) obtained by James Richardson from 

Romaine island 21, 687 

Archean of Brazil 30, 208 

Archipelago, Map of East Indian ; 21, 215 

Arcidiacono, S., cited on Stromboll 28, 256 

Arctic Ocean, Reference to climatic changes in 26, 482 

— , Opportunities for geologic work in far 29, 85-86 

Arctowski, H., cited on changes in temperature distribution 26, 5-48 

climatic changes 26, 482 

sun-spots' effect on solar heat 26, 488-480, 492 

temperature movements 26, 83 

Arcuate mountains, Mechanics of formation of 26, 30 

Arenig shales 27, 574 

Argentina, Fossil deer from 27, 153 

— , Glaciation in 26, 31 

— , Petroleum supply of 28, 612 

Arid and humid Initial conditions, Contrasted characteristics of.. 23,543-548 
moist topographic Juvenility, Contrasted features of 23, 548-554 

— climate, Deflatlve scheme of the geographic cycle in an 23, 49, 537-562 

, Peculiarities of 21, 568 



ARID ^ARNOLD 17 

Page 

Arid cycle in mountainous regions, EiVOlution and condition of. . . 21, 588-592 
initiated in a plains region, Conditions of 21, 592-597 

— erosion, A measure of ; Charles Keyes 26» 404 

— lands of America, Delation of 21, 580-585 

— period of the Permian and Triassic 27, 181 

— physiographic stages. Profile of 21, 596 

— region, Arroyo-running (dry creeks) of 21, 575 

J Comparative effects of corraslon and deflation in 21, 585 

, Extent and volume of eolian transportation in 21, 584 

, Extra limital effects of deflation of 21, 583 

, General corrasive phenomena in 21, 571 

, Importance of deflative process In , 21, 585 

, Influence of through-flowing streams in 21, 575 

, Initial physiographic conditions of the 21, 587, 597 

, Limitations to geologic work of water in 21, 571 

of America, Rio Colorado, Rio Grande, and Rio Pecos, The large 

perennial rivers of 21, 575 

, Subdivisions of 21, 544 

, Plains-forming tendency of w^ind action in 21, 581-583 . 

, R61e of the plains flood-sheet in 21, 572-575 

— stage. Ideal type of early 23, 550 

— United States and northern Mexico, General characteristics of. 21,567,568 
, Geographic provinces of, Map showing 21, 566 

— zones of the Pleistocene and present 27, 180 

Abiditt, Deflation and relative efllciencies of eroslonal processes under 

conditions of 21, 565-508 

— , Essential features of 23, 543 

— , Eolation under the stimulus of 21, 20, 565-598 i 

Arizona, Bajadas of the Santa Catalina Mountains 26, 391 

— , Erosion and deposition In 26, 125 

— , Permo-Trlassic formations of 30, 471, 491 

— , Permo-Triassic fossils from 30, 471, 491 

— -, Permo-Triassic of 30, 155, 471 

— , Petrified log natural bridge near Adamana 21, 323-325 

— , Pine Creek Valley and travertine natural bridge in, Views showing. . 

21, 335, 336 

— , Record of rainfall in 25, 535 

Arkansas diamond-bearing peridotite area ; L. C. Glenn 23, 37, 726 

— , Geological work in 25, 166 

Arkose deposits, Classiflcation of 27, 115 

Arnold, Ralph; An Apalachicola fauna from Lower California 28,223 

— cited on California oil fleld 28, 565 

natural bridge at Santa Cruz, California 21, 326 

oil sands 28, 596 

— , Correlation of the Lower Miocene of ( 'alifornia 26, 415 

— ; Ek:onomic value of paleontology 30, 153 

— , Excursion of California Meeting, August 14, 1915, in charge of 2«, 417 

II — Bdll. Geol. Soc. Am. 



• 



18 J. STANLEY-BROWN INDEX TO VOLUMES 21 TO 30 

Page 

Abnold, Rajlph ; General conditions of the petroleum industry and the 

world's future supply 28,156*603 

— , Oil geology In relation to valuation SO» 96 

— , Photograph of natural bridge at Santa Cruz, California, by 21, 327 

— , and CiJLRK, B. S. ; Marine Oligwene of the West Coast of North 

America 29, 153, 297 

Abbhenius, Svante, cited on cause of glaciation 30, 557 

radio-thermal action 28, 903 

Abtesian well (two) records from Hatteras Island ; Collier Cobb 23, 51 

Abthbofoda, Relation to the strand-line of the Paleozoic ; John M. Clarke 

22, 94, 279 

ABTiODACTi'iA ; O. A.-Petersou 1 23, 86, 162 

Abundel formation, Reptiles of 24, 337 

AscuTNEY Mountain, Vermont, gabbro (with diorite) and diabase of . . . 21, 89 
AsHBUBNEB, C. A., Reference to letter on organizing a geological society 21, 744 

Ashley, G. H., cited on Pennsylyania oil horizons 28, 648 

— ; Experiment in the graphic presentation of the economic geology of 

bedded deposits 27, 122 

— , Geological work in Tennessee of 25, 168 

— , Memorial of Albert Homer Purdue by. 29, 55 

— ; Physiographic study of the Cretaceous-Eocene period of the Rocky 

Mountain front and Great Plains provinces 26, 105 

— ; Stratigraphic study of the Appalachian and Central States, with ref- 
erence to the occurrence of oil and gas 23, 37, 725 

— and Blatchley, W. S., Reference to *The lakes of northern Indiana 

and their associated marl deposits" by 27. 360 

AsHOKAN formation 30, 468 

ASHTON schists 25, 440, 442 

Asia and Europe Triasslc invertebrate faunas and their relation to the 

American 26, 412 

— , Climatic changes in 26, 480 

— , Correlations between geology of America's west ("oast and east coast 

of 29, 81 

— , Effects of sun-spots on climate in 25, 549 

— , Extent of the peripheral ranges of 21, 192 

— , Inclosed lakes of 25, 563 

— Minor and Syria, Post-Tertiary history of the lakes of 21, 20, 755 

— , Petroleum supply of. 28, 614 

— , Significance of the peripheral mountain areas of 2I, 190 

— , Suess' Interpretation of the plan of 21, 183-190 

Asphalt beds of McKlttrick, California, Occurrence of mammal remains 

in the 26, 167 

Association for the Advancement of Science, Reference to American. . 21, 741 

— of American Geologists, Reference to 21, 740 

AsTOBiA series (Oligocene) in the region of Mount Diablo, middle Cali- 
fornia ; B. L. Clarke 28,227 

AsuLKAN glacier, Recent changes in the ; Heinrich Ries 24, 71, 606 

Atlantic and Gulf Coastal Plain, Cretaceous-Eocene contact in the. . . 26, 168 



ATLANTIC — ^AUSTRALITES 19 

Pfige 

Atlantic coast, Connate waters of the 21, 24, 774 

,Magothy formation of the 21,30,780 

,9tability of 23,49,739 

— Coastal Plain fossil floras, Status of the study of the 24, 114 

— Eocene, Correlation of 29, 148 

— Plain, Upper Cretaceous deposits of 27, 154 

— ridge, Tertiary crustal movement in mid- 21, 216-218 

Attawapiskat coral reef 30, 368 

Atterbebo, a., cited on mechanical analyses of sediments 28. 927 

Attica, Indiana, Natural bridge over Bear Creek near 21, 317 

Attlebobo (South), Massachusetts, Some new fossils from Cambrian of 21,76 

Attwix, , cited on drilling of test well 27, 74 

Atwood, W. W., dted on glaclation in the Uinta and Wasatch Moun- 
tains 21, 520 

glaciers of Uinta and Wasatch Mountains. .• 28, 370 

— , Differential erosion and equiplanation discussed by 23, 49 

— , Discussion of geological education of engineers by 28, 138 

glacial formations in western United States by 28, 144 

— ; Early Tertiary glaclation in the San Juan region of Colorado 25, 31 

— elected Fellow 21, 3 

— , Glacial deposits east of Cody, Wyoming, discussed by 23, 45, 731 

— ; Physiographic studies in the San Juan district of Colorado. . . . 22, 66, 735 
— , Pre- Wisconsin glacial drift in the region of Glacier Park, Montana, 

discussed by 23, 44, 730 

— , Reference to *'Some Triassic fossils from southeastern Alaska" of. . 27, 701 

war work of 30, 177 

— ; Relation of physiographic changes to ore alterations 26, 106 

— , Remarks on banded clays by 27, 111 

— , Saving the silts of the Mississippi River by 28, 149 

— , Speaker at annual dinner 26, 104 

— , and Mather, Kirtley P. ; Geographic history of the San Juan Moun- 
tains since the close of the Mesozoic era 27, 38 

; Glacial epochs in the San Juan Mountains of Colorado. . . 23, 46, 732 

Auburn, California, Pleistocene mammal fauna near 27, 160 

Auditing Committee, Geological Society, Election of 21, 2 ; 22, 2 ; 23, 2 ; 

24, 8 ; 25, 5 ; 26, 11 ; 27, 77 ; 28. 11 ; 29, 11 ; 30, 11 

,Report of 21,23; 22,62; 23,44; 24,69; 

25, 49 ; 26, 87 ; 27, 60 ; 28, 137 ; 29, 83 ; 30, 95 

Paleontologlcal Society, Report of 24. 108 ; 25, 133 ; 26, 146 ; 

27, 144 ; 28, 195 ; 29, 125 ; 30, 151 
Augusta sandstone natural bridge, Utah, Description of and view show- 
ing {see plate 19) 21, 317-322 

Austen, Godwin, cited on continental deposits 27, 493 

— cited on Old Red Sandstone 27, 353 

Australia, Petroleum supply of 28, 615 

— , Tertiary crustal movements in 21, 21 

AusTRALiTES, Origin of 27, 51 

— , Photographic examples of 27, 51 



20 J; STANLEY-BROWN INDEX TO VOLUMES 21 TO 30 

Page 
Austria, Petroleum supply of 2S8>|612 

Ayes Ridge, Reference to 29, ^1 

Avian paleontology from the Pacific coast of North America, Ck>ntribu- 

tions to ; Loye Holmes Miller 24, 132 

Avifauna of the Pacific coast, Pleistocene 24, 132 

B 

Bacon, Francis, Reference to work, of 29, 171 

Bacon, R. F., cited on synthesis of hydrocarbons 28, 728 

Bacteria, Early origin of : 28, 246 

Bacterial and algal deposits in the Algonkian Mountains of Montana, 

Occurrence of ; C. D. Walcott 26, 148 

Bactritida, Significance of the 30, 148 

Bad Lands, South Dakota, Natural bridge in 21, 315 

Bago, R. M., Jr. ; Discovery of fiuorite in the Ordovician limestone of 

Wisconsin 29,393 

— ; Effect of rapid offshore deepening on lake-shore deposits 23, 50, 746 

— ; Fluospar in the Ordovician limestone of Wisconsin 29, 373 

— ; Notes on a new method of calculating the date of the Glacial eix>ch. 

22, 66, 735 

— ; Pliocene and Pleistocene foraminifera from California 21, 76 

Baglky, J. W., and Moffit, F. H. ; A method of aerial topographic map- 
ping 30, 110 

Bahama shoal-water corals 27, 154 

Bahia, Brazil, Geologic divisions of the State of 22, 188 

— , Geology of 30. 234 

— , Limestone plains of the interior of 21, 790 

, Climate and climatic relations of 22, 195-197 

Bailey, J. W., cited on oil sands 28, 597 

— , Geological work in Florida of 26, 174 

Bain, H. F., cited on peneplains 29, 580 

— , Discussion of Great Basin deformations by 26, 122 

Santa Barbara county stratification by 21, 793 

— elected Chairman of Cordilleran Section 26, 131 

Councilor 21, 794 

BAiRn, Haberstaot,^ elected Fellow 21, 3 

Bajadas of the Santa Catilina Mountains, Arizona ; C. F. Tolman, Jr.. 26,391 

Baker, C. L.', Acknowledgments to 26, 77 

— ; Notes on the Cenozoic history of central Wyoming 23, 73 

Baker, M. B., cited on interglacial deposits 26, 251 

— quoted on the Fleming of the Navasota region 26, 469 

— , Remarks on lake clays by 27, 82 

rock foliation by 27, 58 

Balch, D. M., Analyses of allanite by 28, 474 

— cited on allanite 28, 468 

Bau) Ea^le conglomerate, and summary history of the Bald Eagle delta, 

Appalachian region 24, 411, 428 



BALL — BARRELL 21 

Pftge 

Ball, S. H., cited on contact of Upper and Lower Laramie 25 1 328 

Baltic region, Lower Ordovicic in 27f 585 

"Baliic shield (The)," Reference to 21, 245 

Bancroft, J. A. ; Investigations into the magnitude of the forces which 
are required to induce movements in various rocks under the con- 
ditions which obtain in the deeper parts of the earth's crust. . . 28, 125 

— , Memorial of Charles Wales Drysdale by 29, 29 

— , Reference to "Geology of the coasts and islands between the Strait 

of Georgia and Queen Charlotte Sound, British Columbia," of.. 27,715 

BANCBorr (Ontario) nephelite syenite, Area of 21, 90 

Banded glacial slates of Permocarboniferous age, showing possible sea- 
sonal variations in deposition ; Robert W. Sayles 27, 110 

Barasaubus ; a gigantic sauroiM)d dinosaur ; R. S. Lull 28, 214 

Barbadian Ridge, Reference to 29, 621 

Babbagallo, a., and Cabnso, D., Depth of Etna crater measured by.. 26,383 
Babbeb, R. a.. Analysis of quartz rock and felsite by 26, 473 

— cited on Diamond Hill quartz deposits 25, 471 

Babdoub, E. H., Analysis of Pennsylvania oolites by 25, 767 

— cited on oolites 25, 760-761 

— , Discussion on fossil mammals by 28, 210 

— ; Nebraska Eurypterids 24, 113 

— ; Plant tissue in the Carboniferous shales of Nebraska 24, 113 

Babboub, Thomas, cited on West Indian reptilia 29, 657, 661 

Babite deposits of Five Islands, Nova Scotia ; Charles H. Warren. . 21, 33, 786 
Missouri ; W. A. Tarr 28, 132 

— from the Saratoga oil fields 25, 77 

Babks of trees, Resistance to decay of 24, 116 

Bablow, A. E., Bibliography of 26, 15 

— cited on gneissoid granites 28, 450 

Lake Huron volcanic rocks 25, 254 

magmatic assimilation 25, 261 

nephelite syenite fields of eastern Ontario 21, 91, 113 

— , Discussion on origin of the alkaline rocks by 21, 32 

— ; The geology of the Chlbougaman region, Quebec, Canada 22, 67, 738 

— , Memoir of David Pearce Penhallow by 22, 15 

— , Memorial of 26, 13 

—, Photograph of 26, 12 

Babnitt, V. H., cited on geology of Indian reservations 25, 350 

Silurian formations , . 28, 808 

Babbaicde, Joachim, cited on Komorau formation of Bohemia 27, 584-585 

the Silurian 27, 558 

— , Reference to "Primordial" of 28, 810 

Babbell, Joseph, cited on ancient delta deposits 26, 221 

. — Appalachian Devonian delta 28, 786 

delta deposits 28,905 

"diastems" 29, 358 

explanation of red color in Old Red Sandstone 27, 376 

geologic climates 30, 553 



22 J. STANLEY-BROWN INDEX TO VOLUMES 21 TO 30 

Page 

Barbell, Joseph, cited on geological importance of sedimentation 21,525 

island phenomena 29, 554 

Mauch Chunk shale 28. 891 

metamorphism 28, 407 

oolitic shale 29, 588 

Pennsylvania peneplains 29, 578 

radioactive transformation 26, 194 

radioactivity 30, 544 

Silurian formation In New Jersey 27, 543 

strength of earth's crust 27. 190-191 ; 28, 785 

— ^ Classification of marine deposits discussed by 24, 74, 711 

— ; Criteria for the recognition of ancient delta deposits . . 23, 48, 377-440, 743 

— , Discussion of Pleistocene deformation by 28. 165 

on Post-Tertiary history of the lakes of Asia Minor and Syria by. . 

21. 20, 756 

types of sand grains by 21, 25, 775 

— ; Dominantly fluviatile origin, under seasoned rainfall, of the Old Red 

Sandstone 27, 39, 345 

— , Fossiliferous conglomerates discussed by 23, 83 

— ; Influence of Silurian-Devonian climates on the rise of air-breathing 

vertebrates 27, 40, 387 

— , News on geologic climates of 30, 563 

— ; Piedmont terraces of the northern Appalachians and their mode of 

origin; also post-Jurassic history of the northern Appalachians.. 

24, 70, 688 

— quoted on distinction between aeollan and aqueous deposits 21, 799 

— ; Reference to "Criteria for the recognition of ancient delta deiK)8its" 

by 27, 354 

decomposition under aridity 21, 631, 632 

"Mud-cracks as a criterion of continental sedimentation" by.. 27,354 

"Relations between climate and terrestrial deposits" by 27, 353 

"The origin and significance of the Mauch Chunk shale" by . . . 27, 412 

"Some distinctions between marine and terrestrial conglomer- 
ates" by 27. 357 

"The Upper Devonian delta of the Appalachian geosyncline" by 27, 353 

— , Remarks on Black Hills granite by 27. 104 

evidence of recent subsidence on the coast of Maine by 26, 92 

glacial banding by 27, 112 

— ; Rhythms and the measurements of geologic time 28, 745 

— ; Significance of sedimentary rhythm 28, 162, 206 

— ; Sources and tendencies In American geology 30, 77 

Barrett, E., cited on oil-producing Huron sandstone 28, 668 

Barrett, L. P., cited on Keweenaw series 27, 94 

Barriers and currents, The nature of Tertiary and modern marine 

f aunal 22. 93, 218 

— to the Great Lakes, Niagara limestone 24, 229 

Barrois, Charles, cited on Arenlg of Brittany 27, 578 

— elected Correspondent 21, 4 



BAKROW BA8SLER 23 

Page 

Babjww, G., cited on the vesticularity of lavas 25. 651 

Bakbows, a. L. ; Geologic significance of fossil rock-boring animals 28, 190, 065 
— ; Preliminary inquiry into the geological significance of rock-boring 

shells 24, 130 

Babrows, H. H., Reference to war work of 30, 180 

Babby, , Reference to "Orkney" by 27, 375 

Babth, Nevada, Iron-ore deposit at 24, 06 

Barton, D. G. ; Geologic significance and genetic classification of the 

arkose deposit 27, 115 

Barton, G. H., Bibliography of W. H. Niles by 23, 34 

— , Memoir of William Harmon Niles by 22, 8 

Bartbam, W., Coastal Plain work of 26, 150 

— , Geological work in Florida of. 25, 174 

Georgia of 25,173 

Louisiana of 25, 172 

Texas of 25,164 

Babtsch, Paul, cited on land mollusca of Virgin Islands 27, 43-44 

Babus, Cabl, cited on determination of geologic time by means of fusion 

curve of diabase 28, 830 

diabase melting-point curve 26, 108 

— , Reference to studies on accurate high temperature scale of 21, 141 

Bascom, Flobence, Introduction of F. C. Brown by 25, 58 

— ; Magmatic assimilation 26, 82 

— ; Pre-Cambrian Igneous rocks of the Pennsylvania Piedmont 26, 81 

Bascok Lake, Landslips and lake clays of 27, 81 

Basic igneous rocks, N. H. Winchell's studies of 23, 324 

— rocks of Rhode Island: their correlation and relationships; A. C. 

Hawkins and C. W. Brown 26, 02 

Basin range faulting in the northwestern part of the Great Basin ; G. D. 

Louderback •. 26, 138 

type of mountains. Occurrence of , 21, 543, 544 

— ranges, Types of ancient structures of the 21, 550-555 

— region, Oligocene of 25, 153 

, Pacific Coast Tertiary formations. Correlation of 25, 156 

Basins, Characteristics of glacier junction 21, 721 

— within the hamada of the Libyan desert. Origin of 26, 306 

Bassleb, Habvey, Swabtz, C. K., and Price, W. A., Jb. ; Coal Measures 

of Maryland . . .- 30, 567 

; Stratigraphy and correlation of the Coal Measures of Mary- 
land 30, 154 

— and Swabtz, C. K. ; Typical section of the Allegheny formation 30, 153 

Bassleb, R. S., Adequacy of the Paleontologic record 21, 73 

— , Black shale problem discussed by 24, 113 

—, The Cataract discussed by 24, 107 

— cited <Jn argillites 30, 532 

Asaphus and LowvlUe beds 27, 601 

brachiopod t3T)es of Middle Ordovicic 27, 504 

classification of Ordovicic rock 27, 570 



24 J. STANLEY-BROWN INDEX TO VOLUMES 21 TO 30 

Page 

Bassleb, R. S., cited on early Paleozoic Bryozoa 27, 590-591 

Ostracoda , 27, 538 

— , The Cremacrinidcd discussed by 24, 109 

— , Deyelopment of the montlculiporolds discussed by 23, 84 

— , Devonic corals discussed by 23, 87 

— , Discussion of Alaska Paleozoic section by 26, 137 

new paleogeo^aphic maps by 25, 136 

Tennessee shale by 28, 207 

the Trepostomata by 26, 158 

— elected Secretary 24, 104 

— elected Secretary Paleontological Society vice H. F. Cleland, resigned 21,72 

— , Fish fauna discussed by 23, 87 

— ; Methods of study and the classification of American Tertiary bryozoa 

28,204 

— , O. P. Hay introduced by 23, 87 

— ; Ordovician and Silurian polar faunas (extempore) 22, 92 

— , Paleontological notes discussed by 24, 108 

— ; Paleozoic deposits and fossils in the Piedmont of Maryland and Vir- 
ginia 29, 127 

history of Central America and the West Indies 29, 129 

— , Paper of Frank Springer on Crinoid genus Scyphocrinus read by. . 24, 110 

— , Reference to Bryozoa lists 27, 598 

photograph of Fairmont formation by 28, 806 

studies of the Baltic Bryozoa of 22, 257 

— , Secretary, Ck>nference on the faunal criteria in Paleozoic paleogeog- 

raphy 22, 217 

Paleontological Society 26, 141 ; 27. 139 

; Proceedings of the Eighth Annual Meeting of the Paleontological 

Society, held at Albany, New York, December 27, 28, and 29, 1916 28, 189 

; Proceedings of the Ninth Annual- Meeting of the Paleontological 

Society, held at Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, December 31, 1917, and 

January 1 and 2, 1918 29 119 

; Proceedings of the Tenth Annual Meeting of the Paleontological 

Society, held at Baltimore, Maryland, December 28, 1918 30 143 

; Symposium on ten years' progress in vertebrate paleontology 

23, 85, 155-266 
— ; The stratigraphic significance of Ostracoda 22 94 275 

— and Canu, F. ; Principles of classification of Cyclostome bryozoa. . . 29*, 151 

Bastin, E. S., cited on allanite 28 467 471 

feldspar deposits 28 861 

— , Correlation of Paleozoic faunas discussed by 23 83 

— , Discussion of colloidal migration in ore deposits by 26 394 

papers l>earing on ore deposition by 2A 403 

— elected Fellow o^ 3 

— , Origin of granites and meta crystals discussed by ;^ 04 73 

— , Remarks on the Coal Creek batholith by 2e 399 

Batemait, Alan M. ; Military and geologic mapping — a plane-table 30' 405 

— ; A plane-table for military mapping ^J ^^^ 



BATES — BEARPAW 25 

Page 

Batsb, H. W., quoted on ant structures 21, 473 

ants of the Amazon Valley 21, 454 

Bates, M., Maps of Kansas oil fields by 28, 692 

Batouth of British Columbia and Alaska, Subalkaline coast range 21, 90 

Bathymetbical chart of the oceans, after Sir John Murray 21, 217 

Bathyrellua cf. fratemua BllUngs, Fossil of the quartzite at Geneva. . . 21, 527 

— sp., Fossil of the quartzite at Geneva 21, 527 

Bathyrus f congenerU, Fossil of the quartzite at Geneva 21, 527 

Bauer, C. M., cited on flow of Missouri River 27, 298 

Baub, 6., cited on eplotic 28, 986 

epipterygoid 28, 981 

metamorphism 28, 379 

Bautista Creek badlands, Fauna of 29, 163 

Bavaria, Pillow lavas in 26, 597 

Baxter, , cited on atomic weight of lead *. 28, 849 

Bat of Fundy, Estuaries of 28, 323 

, Geological history of ; Sidney Powers 26, 94 

, Marine faunas found by dredging in 27, 160 

Bayley, W. S., cited on allanlte 28, 471 

Maine minerals .' 29, 463 

Pennsylvania Precambrian 29, 376 

— ; Peculiar iron ore from the Dunham mine, Pennsylvania 23, 44 

— , Remarks on revision of pre-Cambrian classification in Ontario by. . . 26, 88 

Bayusb, John Y., quoted on work of white ants 21, 491 

Bays of Big Walker Mountain, Virginia, Fossils from 24, 543 

— sandstone and summary of the Bays problem 24, 446-458 

Bays-Sevier, Tennessee, Section of 24, 451 

Beach cusps, Artificial 21, 615 

, Characteristics of 21, 599-615 

, Common occurrence of 21, 600 

; D. W. Johnson 21, 27, 599-624 

, Diagram illustrating the formation of 21, 602 

, Figures showing variations in the form of 21, 605, 606, 608, 612 

; M. S. W. Jefferson 21, 26 

, Literature of 21, 60a604 

, Relation to other factors of shore activity of 21, 613-615 

, Size, spacing, and formation of 21, 607-612 

, Theories of origin of 21, 615-623 

— of Covey Hill, Reputed marine 23, 475 

— , Remarkable deformation of the Algonquin 24, 71, 697 

Beaches about south end of Lake Michigan 29, 235 

— and tidal marshes of the Atlantic coast; N. S. Shaler, Reference to. 21,600 
— , Isobases of the Algonquin and Iroquois 21, 21, 227-248, 761 

— of Lake Algonquin, Battlefield, and Fort Brady 26, 69 

Beaditeix, H. J. L., cited on inclosed lakes of Asia 25, 563 

Bear Creek, near Attica, Indiana, Natural bridge over 21, 317 

shale 29, 342 

Bearpaw formation of Alberta Cretaceous 27, 682 



26 J. STANLEY-BROWN INDEX TO VOLUMES 21 TO 30 

Beabpaw shale 25. 346 

Bear River formatioii. Stratigraphy of so-called 27f 70 

plateau ajod Uuntsville basin, Utah, Sketch map showing part of. 21, 540 

range. Part of Wasatch Mountains called 21, 518 

Beabino of the distribution of the existing flora of Central America and 

the Antilles on former land connections ; W. Trelease 29, 129, 649 

Beatkicea beds, Anticostl island 21, 697 

Beck, R., cited on ore deposits 25, 770 

— f Perfect fracture system in Saxon Switzerland shown by 22, 159 

Becke, F., cited on metamorphism 28, 383 

— , Reference to division of igneous rocks advocated by 21, 114 

Beckeb, G. F., Address of retiring President : Isostagy and radioactivity 

26, 86, 171-204 

— cited on geologic time 28, 836 

granodiorite • 27,204 

island subsidence 29, 578 

isostasy 28, 857 

isostatic equilibrium 27, 190 

Llano series of Texas 28, 862 

measurement of geologic time. 28, 751, 863-864 

Philippine coral reefs 28, 540 

radioactivity 28, 858-860 

saprolites 28,462 

— , Ck>operation in gathering and interpreting data urged by 21, 142 

— , President, Telegrams on account of illness to and from 26, 57 

— , Reference to speech at dinner by 25, 80 

— and JoLY, John, cited on difference of opinion as to age of the earth 26, 201 

Beckwith formation, Stratigraphy of so-called 27. 70 

Becquebel rays 28, 842 

Beckafi fauna 30, 470 

Becsie River formation, ^Vnticosti island. Zones and faunas of 21, 705-708 

, Correlation of 21, 706-708 

, Differences between faunas of Ellis Bay and 2I, 706 

, Fossils of 21, 705-708 

, Location, composition, and thickness 21, 705-708 

Bedded deposits discussed by E. B. Branson 28, 208 

, Economic geology of 27, 148 

Bedbock complex of the Sierra Nevada, General features of the structure 

of the ; George D. Louderback. 24, 98 

Beebe, C. W., Skin and skeleton of PtUocercus loicii from Borneo ob- 
tained by 24, 247 

Beecheb, C. E., cited on amphibian footprints 27, 409 

— ; Revision of the families of loop-bearing BrachioiKxla and develop- 
ment of Terebratalia obsffleta Dall, Reference to 22 258 

Beecheb, M. A., Reference to work in Wasatch Mountains 2I, 517 

Beede, J. W., cited on Kansas oil fields 28. 687 

— ; Correlation of the Guadalnplan and Kansas sections 21, 76 

— ; Development of three successive peneplains in Kansas 28, 160 



BEEDE ^BERGT 27 

Page 
Beede, J. W., Discussion on Permian floras in the western "Red beds". 21,75 
— ; Origin of the sedimepts and coloring matter of the eastern Oklahoma 

Red Beds 2S3, 36, 723 

Beeklt, a. L., cited on geology of Indian reservations 25, 350 

triceratops-bearing beds 26, 348 

Beekm ANTOWN, "Romaine formation" substituted in Mingan islands for 

21,683 

Belches Islands, Algal limestone on 29, 128 

, Iron formation on 29, 90 

Belgium, Reference to formation along north coast of 25, 321 

mammal-bearing horizons in 25, 323 

Bell, Robert, cited on decay of crystalline rocks 28, 838 

Devonian fossils 30, 370 

Ordovician rocks 30, 342 

— ; inversion of the Montreal River 21, 21, 762 

— , Memoir of Thomas Chesmer Weston by 22, 32 

— ; Report on the geology of the French River district, Ontario, Refer- 
ence to 22, 150 

— , Silurian coral reefs 30, 353 

Bell, W. A., cited on Burypterid beds at Otisville 27, 533 

Bellamy, G. V., cited on Salt Lake of Lamaca, island of Cypress 21, 648 

Bellinoham series, Rocks of 25, 448-449 

Belly River beds 25, 369-371 

compared with Judith River beds 25, 369 

correlated with the Judith River beds 25,380 

. Fossils from 25, 370-377, 379 

of Alberta equivalent to the Judith River beds of Dog Creek and 

Cow Island, Montana ; C. H. Sternberg 26, 149 

fauna compared with other faunas 25, 387 

formation of Alberta Cretaceous 27, 681 

Ridge, Alberta, Deposits on 24, 531 

Belt, Thomas, quoted on the Pis-Pis district, Nicaragua 23, 495 

Benge, Elmeb, cited on allanite 28, 472 

Bennett, John, cited on *'Kickapoo" limestone 28, 421 

Benton, E. R., quoted on Richmond boulder trains 21, 752 

— , Reference to "the Richmond boulder trains" of 21, 747, 749 

— formation of Alberta Cretaceous 27, 679 

— sandstone 25, 345 

Bebckheimeb, F. ; Calcareous algae from the Silurian 25, 137 

— , Discussion of intraformatlonal corrugation 25, 37 

Bebea grit in Ohio, Diastrophic importance of the unconformity at the 

base of the ; H. P. Cushing 26, 205-216 

— sandstone in Ohio 26, 96, 155, 205-215 

Beboeat, a., cited on volcanic vents 28, 250, 257, 265, 275 

Beboemann, C, cited on allanite 28, 491 

Beboeb, a. B., cited on Coal Measure sections 30, 583 

Bebgebon, J., cited on fossils of Tremadoc age , 27, 574 

Bebot, W., cited on oolites 25, 760 



28 J. STANLEY-BROWN INDEX TO VOLUMES 21 TO 30 

Page 
Berkeley, California, Eleventh Annual Meeting of Cordllleran Section 

held at 21, 789 

— Meeting, Register of Fellows and visitors at 23, 75-76 

Bebkey, G. p., acted as Secretary of afternoon meeting, December 28, 

1915 27, 47 

— cited on Catskill glaciation 28, 549 

glacial clays 27, 111 

paleogeography of Saint Peter time 21, 5ft4 

Porto Rican formations 27, 83-85 

St. Peter sandstone. 27, 001 

stratigraphy of Uinta Mountains 21, 530 

— , Discussion of basic rocks of Rhode Island by 26, 92 

geoloigcal education of engineers by 28, 138 

— ; Engineering geology in and after the war 30, 81 

— ; Geological light from the Catskill aqueduct 24, 74, 711 

reconnaissance of Porto Rico 26, 113, 156 

— ; Objects and methods of petrographic description 24, 76, 719 

— ; Observations on rate of sea-cliflP erosion 21, 29, 778 

— quoted on Sylvania sandstone 21, 656 

— , Reference to war work of 30, 81 

— , Secretary pro tempore 27, 7 

, Proceedings of the Twenty-ninth Annual Meeting of the Geo- 
logical Society of America, held at Albany, New York, December 

27, 28, and 29, 1916 28, 1 

— , Joseph H. Sinclair introduced by 27, 85 

— ; Summary of geological investigations connected with the Catskill 

aqueduct 28, 174 

Beblik Museum, Skeleton of dinosaur from German East Africa in the 26, 153 

Bernard, Feux, cited on Silurian formations 27, 558 

Bernard, W. E., cited on oil-field structure 28, 640 

Bernardini, L., cited on fumaroles of Vesuvius 26, 377 

Berry, E. W. ; Age of certain plant-bearing beds and associated marine 

formations in South America 29, 637 ; 30, 153 

— appointed on Board of Control 30, 146 

Secretary for Group B, Second Section 25, 39 

— cited on age of Antrim basalts 28, 875 

Bolivian fauna 29, 648 

Comanchian floras 26, 301 

coal 27,85 

correlation of Potomac formations 26, 336 

; Cretaceous flora 30, 52 

fossil flora of Peru 29, 641 

paleobotany of Morrison formation 29, 260 

the Potomac plants in the Patuxent formation 26, 304 

Wilcox flora 25,332,333 

plants 30, 530 

— ; Determination of Maine fossils 28, 309, 319, 320 

— elected Fellow 21, 3 



BERRY- 



BIBLIOGRAPHY 29 



Page 

Bebey, E. W., Introduction of H. P. Little by 28, 167 

— ; Paleogeographlc significance of the Cenozoic floras of equatorial 

America and the adjacent regions 29, 129, 631 

— ; Plants associated with human remains at Vero, Florida 28, 197 

— quoted on Morrison and Kootenai faunas «... 26, 346 

— , Remarks on reef-deposits by 27, 147 

— ; Status of the study of the Atlantic Coastal Plain fossil floras 24, 114 

— and Campbell, M. R., cited on the Morrison and the Kootenai forma- 

tions 26, 305 

Bebtrai^d, C. Em cited on origin of oil 28, 729 

Bebtband, Mabcel, and Reyeb, E., Reference by Suess to advances made 

In mountain study by 21, 189 

Bethi^uem moraine 27, 264 

— , Relation of Carroll moraine to 27, 284 

— , Structure of 27, 272 

— , Topography of 27, 271 

— , Trend of 27, 273 

Beyeb, S. W., elected Councilor Geological Society for 1912-14 23, 2 

BiBBiifS, A. B. ; Magothy formation of the Atlantic coast 21, 30, 780 

BiBLiooBAPHT of Alfred Ernest Barlow 26, 15 

Ernest Bobertson Buckley 24, 47 

Samuel Calvin 23, 9 

Theodore Bryant Comstock ^ 27, 13 

Charles A. Davis 28, 38 

OrviUe A. Derby 27, 21 

Edward Clarence Dutton 24, 17 

Samuel Franklin Emmons 23, 24 

formation names 25, 50 

Persifor Frazer 21, 10 

geology of Brazil 80,223 

Long Island 28,307,308 

glaciation in White, CatskiU, and Adirondack Mountains 28, 551 

Christopher Webber Hall '. 23, 29 

Charles W. Hayes 28, 118 

E. W. Hilgard 27,54 

F. A. Hill 28,69 

Joseph Austin Holmes 27, 31 

Horace Carter Hovey 26, 25 

J. C. K. Laflamme 22,7 

Daniel W. Langton, Jr 21, 15, 16 

Joseph Le Conte 26, 54 

Mammoth Cave; Horace C. Hovey and R. Ellsworth Call.... 23,51,747 

W J McGee 24,24 

metauiorphism 28, 416 

W. H. Niles 23,34 

'Notharcius and Lemuroidea 26, 443 

Pleistocene geology of New England 30, 632 

Pleistocene uplift in New York 27, 255 



30 J.STANLEY-BROWN INDEX TO VOLUMES 21 TO 30 

P&ge 

Bibliography of post-Glacial literature 29) 229 

C. S. Prosser 28, 76 

Ralph Stockman Tarr 24, 41 

the "Chelonoidea" , 23, 219 

geological and geographical literature of the Andean Republic 

of South America ; Vernon F. Marsters 24, 75 

New Mexico coal fields 23, a^)9-686 

Trepostomata 26, 366 

A. B. Willmott 27, 38 

Newton Horace Winchell 26, 31 

BiCKBfORE, Albert Smith, Memorial of 26, 18 

— , Photograph of 26, 18 

Bio Bad Lands, South Dakota, Natural bridge in 21, 325, 326 

BiGELOw, F. H., cited on storm tracks 25, 509 

Big Horn and Wind River basins, Eocene and Oligocene of 22, 63, 722 

basin of Wyoming, Characteristics and analyses of 24, 610 

, The Lambdotherium zone in the 22, 95 

, Origin of the structure 24, 614 

^ Topographic expression and distribution 24, 607 

BILLII7GS, E., cited on Pentamerua harrandei 27, 311 

white quartzite ^ 27, 569 

— , Divisions of Anticostl strata by 21, 679 

— quoted on fossils of Anticosti '. 21, 678 

— , Reference to his "Catalogues of the Silurian fossils of the island of 

Anticosti" 21, 681, 695 

— and Halt., James, Fossils of Anticosti by 21, 678 

BiLUNGSLEY, P., clted ou the Shawangunk 27, 534 

Biogenetic law illustrated in the development of fossil Cephalopods; 

James Perrin Smith 24, 129 

Biologic principles of paleogeography ; Charles Schuchert 21, 73 

BiOMETRic method, Application to the interpretation of fossils of the. . 21, 297 

Biotite granites of Diamond Hill-Cumberland district 25, 459 

Bird, J. C, "Birds Hill," an*esker near Winnipeg named after 21, 408 

Birds (fossil) of the west coast, Some problems encountered in the study 

of ; L. H. Miller 26, 417 

— Hill esker, Structure of 21, 409-414 

, Moose Neck, and Oak Hummock, Map and section of 21, 407 

BiRi limestone of Norway 27, 570 

Bison of Rancho La Brea ; Asa C. Chandler 27, 170 

BissELL, G. H., cited on oil 28, 622 

Blackfoot peneplain, Montana, Cycles of erosion in 24, 534 

Black Hill, Precambrian granite of 27, 104 

structure of 27, 106 

— Hills and Homestake ore body, Pre-Cambrian structure of the north- 

ern 24, 73, 293-300, 704 

— River formation, Mingan series. Thickness of 2I, 688 

time. Highest rocks of Mingan islands probably of 2I, 682 

— shale problem, Contributions to the ; Charles Butts 24, 113 



BLACKWELDER BLUE 31 

Page 
Black WELDEB, Eliot, Bannock thrust, smitheastern Idaho, discussed by. 

24, 50, 676 

— ; Characteristics of continental elastics and chemical deposits 28, 162, 

207, 917 

— cited on Amsden formation 29» 309 

dolomite 28, 444 

earthflows 28, 350 

■ oolitic limestones 25, 74 

Oregonlan deformation 27, 513 

the "Nevadian movement" 27, 508 

uplifts in Wyoming 28, 813 

— ; Coralline algae in an Ordovician dolomite 24, 115, 607-624 

— , Discussion of peneplain dating by / 29, 90 

— ; Geological transformations of phosphorus 27, 47 

— ; Gros Ventre slide 23, 51, 487-491, 739 

— ; New light on the geology of the Wasatch Mountains. . . 21, 22, 517-542, 767 

Keweenawan fault discussed by 24, 76 

— ; Origin of the Bighorn dolomite of Wyoming 24, 607-624 

Rocky Mountain phosphate deposits. . . . : 26, 100 

— ; Precambrian rocks in the Medicine Bow Mountains of Wyoming. . . 29,97 

— , Reference to "Phosphate deposits near Ogden, Utah," by 21, 531 

— , Sediments of Center County, Pennsylvania, discussed by 24, 112 

— ; Study of the sediments as an aid to the earth historian 29, 84 

Blairmobe formation of Alberta Cretaceous 27, 678 

,BiJkKE, J. F., cited on marine deposits 28, 739 

pillow lava 25, 602 

Blake, Willulm Phipps, Memoir of (with bibliography and portrait), by 

Rossiter W. Raymond 22, 36 

— , Reference to fossil shells collected in California by 25, 162 

Blandfords, The, cited on proofs of ancient glaciation 27, 184 

Blasdale, W. C, and Loudebback, G. D. ; Ruby corundum from San 

Bernardino County, California 21, 793 

Blastocerus pampteus, Mounted skeleton of fossil deer.' 27, 153 

Blatchley, W. S., cited on dolomite 28, 438 

Indiana oil wells 28, 670, 673 

— elected Fellow 21, 3 

— and Ashley, G. H., Reference to "The lakes of northern Indiana and 

their associated marl deposits" by 27, 360 

Bleaching of granite and limestone contacts ; H. P. Cushiug 21, 33, 786 

Bleiningeb, a. v., cited on production of colloids 28, 713 

Bliss, E. A.; Some problems of international readjustifient of mineral 

supplies as indicated in recent foreign literature 30, 101 

Blochmann, Fr., Reference to work on Brachiopods 22, 258 

Blodoett, Miss M. E., cited on beach cusps 21, 604 

Blooi>-mixtube through migrations. Application of principle to animals 24, 285 

Bluefield formation, Mississlppian delta of Virginia 23, 452 

Blue Ridge, Analyses of normative feldspar from 27, 216 

region, Hypersthene syenite of 27, 193 



32 J. STANLEY-BROWN INDEX TO VOLUMES 21 TO 30 

Pa«e 

Blytt. Axel, cited on measurements of geologic time 28> 747 

BoAz's *The Mind of Primitive Man" cited 24, 285 

BoHic, J., cited on fossils in the Upper Triassic rocks of Norway and 

Spltzbergen t 27, 707 

— , Reference to *'Ueber die obertriadische Fauna der BJlreninsel" of. . 27. 707 

BoEKE, H., cited on metamorphism 28, 385 

BooGiU), O. B., cited on dolcnnite rliombohedra 28, 445 

Bohemia, Ordovicic in 27, 584 

Bohemian moldavites, Reference to 26, 265 

BOIJ90NS, Some physiographic features of 26, 392 

Bolton, W. S., cited on pillow lava ^ 25, 005 

BoLTWooD, B. B., cited on half-value period of radium 28, 843 

lead production 26, 190 

lead-uranium ratio 28,879 

i — measurement of geologic time 28, 749 

radioactivity 28, 800 

uranium 28, 849 

BoNiNE, 0. A., cited on Ohio gas pool 28, 568 

Bonnet, E., cited on Tertiary floras 29, 634 

Bonneville Lake, Reference to origin of 28, 351 

BoNNEY, T. G., cited on spheroid serpentine 25, 601 

spheroidal structure 25, 634 

— , Quotation from his appendix to Darwin*s **Structure and distribution 

of coral reefs" 22, 251 

BoRABORA, Tahiti, Coral island model of 26, 79 

BoBKHOLM formation 25, 286 

Born, Axel, Reference to criticism by 27, 590, 598 

BoRNEMANN, J. G., clted on Stromboli 28, 263 

Borneo, Celebes, and Halmahera, Tertiary crustal movements in 21,214 

BoRNHARDT, W., clted ou mctamorphism 28, 402 

South African In8ell>erglaiidschaft 21, 592 

BoBNHOLM, Ordovicic of 27, 618 

Bornite, Composition of 25, 90 

Boston Society of Natural History, Reference to.' 21, 227 

BoswoBTH, T. 0., cited on oil sands 28, 596 

ore-fleld geology 28, 555 

Bottom control of the composition of marine faunas as illustrated by 

dredging In the Bay of Funtlj- ; E. M. Kindle 27, 160 

Bouqcer, Pierre, cited on measuremeut of the Peruvian arc and attrac- 
tion of Chimborazo 26, 172 

Boulder beds of the Vaney shale at Talihina, Oklahoma ; J. B. Wood- 
worth 23, 50, 457-462 

— trains, Richmond and Great Barrington 21, 751 

Boundary between Cretaceous and Tertiary In North America as indi- 
cated by stratigraphy and invertebrate faunas; T. W. Stanton. . 25,341 

BouNDEY, E. S., Title of paper by 25, 124 

Bout WELL, J. M., cited on the Carboniferous Mesozoic formations of 

the Wasatch region 21, 518, 530 



BOUTWELL BRANCA 33 

Page 
BouTWELL, J. M., Reference to his studies in the Park City mining dis- 
trict 25, 518, 534 

BowEN, C. F., cited on triceratop-bearing beds 25, 348 

— , Reference to dinosaurs found by 25, 328-329 

BowEN, N. L., cited on anorthosite 29, 400 

gravitative separation of crystals 27, 327 

— , Crystallization of certain pyroxene-bearing artificial melts 25, 91 

— ; Diffusion in silicate melts 27, 48 

— ; Hydrous silicate melts. 29, 102 

— ; Problem of the anorthosites 28, 154 

— , Reference to work of 29, 186 

— , Remarks on Pacific Islands by 27, 49 

— ; Significance of glass-making processes to the petrologist 29, 102 

Bowie, William, cited on determination of geologic time 28, 840 

— ; Gravity anomalies and geological formations 23, 50 

Bowman, Isaiah, cited on Persian Gulf 28, 780 

— , Reference to war work of 30, 177 

Bownockeb, J. A. ; The Clinton sand as a source of oil in Ohio, .y . 22, 67, 736 

— , Memoir of William George Tight by 22, 19 

— ; Petroleum in Ohio and Indiana 28. 156, 667 

Boyd, D., Reference to ^ 26, 163 

Botle's law. Reference to 28, 860 

Brache, Tycho, Reference to meteorologic observations of 25,549-550 

Bbachiofoda and I*elecypoda from Walker Mountain, Virginia 24, 454 

— , Cambrian 25. 137 

— from New Mexico 28, 690 

— , Genera of Mississippian loop-bearing ; Stuart Weller 22, 92 

— , The stratigraphic significance of ; Charles Schuchert 22, 93, 258 

Bbachiofodb, Bathymetric range in general, inarticulata genera, articu- 

lata genera, and shell characters of deep-water species of. . 22, 258-266 
— , Geographic situation in general, distribution of the genera, deep-sea 
realm, boreal region, Oceanica, Gondwana, and equatorial Atlantic 

of recent 22, 268-274 

— , Geologic history of living 22, 266-268 

— , Lake Minnewanka section, Alberta 24, 112 

— , Notes on life of 29, 154 

— of the Edmunds fauna, Silurian section of England 24, 382 

Sea of and east coast of Japan, List of 22, 269 

Bbachiosaubus, Reconstruction of the skeleton of ; W. D. Matthew . , . 26, 153 

Bradley, , Geological work in Georgia by 25, 174 

Bbadixt, F. II., cited on unakite 27, 220 

Bradley, W. M., cited on allanite 28, 478 

Brain structures of fossil fishes from the Caney shales ; C. R. Eastman 

24, 119 

Braipterd and Seely's section. Reference to 21, 688 

Branca, Wilhelm, cited on skeleton of dinosaur from German East 

Africa in Berlin Museum 26, 153 

r Tendaguru series .' 29, 264 

III — Bull. Obol. See. Am. 



34 J. STANLEY-BROWN INDEX TO VOLUMES 21 TO 30 

Page 
Branneb, J. C. ; Aggraded limestone plains of the interior of Bahia and 

the climatic changes suggested by them 22, 187 

— cited on chemical deposition 28. 739 

Hawaiian Islands 28* 511 

— , Discussion of Eocene of the Cowlitz Valley, Washington, by 26, 136 

Geological Survey of Brazil and plans of Oregon Bureau 26,138 

Tertiary sedimentaries and lavas by 26, 137 

— elected chairman of Cordilleran Se(*tion 26. 12ri ; 26, 135 

— , Faulting in the Great Basin discussed by 26, 139 

— ; Fluting of crystalline rocks in the tropics 24, 94 

— ; Geologic work of ants in tropical America 21, 450-496, 790 

— , Geological map of Brazil by 28, 127 ; 29, 69, 98 

work in Arkansas of 25, 167 

— ; Influence of wind on the accimiulation of oil-bearing rocks 24, 94 

— ; Limestone plains of the interior of Bahia 21, 790 

— ; Memorial of Orville A. Derby 27, 15 

— , The oldest fossils discussed by 24, 97 

— ; Outlines of the geology of Brazil to accompany the geologic map of 

Brazil ■ 30, 189 

— ; Photograph of ant-hills by 21, 480, 484 

— quoted on natural bridge at Santa Cruz, California 21, 326 

— , Reference to his "The origin of beach cusps" 21, 601 

— ; The stone reefs of Brazil, etcetera. Reference to 22, 197 

— , Theory of formation of beach cusps 21, 617 

Branson, E. B. ; Amsden formation of Wyoming and its fauna 28, 170 

— ; Bull Lake Creek rock slide in the Wind River Mountains of Wyo- 
ming 28, 347 

— cited on age of oolitic shale 29, 587 

amphibian footprints 27, 411 

— ; Devonian fishes of Missouri 24, 119 

— , Discussion of bedded deposits by 28, 208 

red beds of Wyoming by 28, 168 

— ; A fish fauna from the Pennsylvanian of W.voming 23, 87 

— introduced D. K. Greger . . .• 28, 209 

— ; Large rock slide in the Wind River Mountains of Wyoming 28, 149 

— ; Mississipplan delta in the northern New River district of Virginia . 23, 48, 

447-455, 743 
— ; Notes on the stratigraphy and faunas of the Lower Kinderhookian 

in Missouri 29, 93 

— ; Origin of the red beds of western Wyoming 26, 61, 217-230 

thick salt and gypsum deposits 26, 103, 231-242 

— ; Paleogeography of Missouri 29, 71 

— .Reference to "Amphibian footprints from the Mississipplan of Vir- 
ginia" by 27, 411 

— ; Remarkable geologic section near Columbia, Missouri 28, 170 

— ; Stream meanders 29, 79 

— ; Use of fossil fishes In correlating strata 28, 216 



BRANSON BRIDGE 35 

Page 
Bbanson, K. B., and Gbeoeb, D. K. ; Arasden formation of the east slope 

of the Wind River Mountains of Wyoming and its fauna 20, 309 

; Devonian of central Missouri 26, 112, 156 

Brassfield formation. Relation of the Cataract to the 25, 291 

BHA.UNS, R., cited on metamorphishi 28, 401 

pillow structure . . ,. 26, 598 

Brazil, Archean of 30, 203 

— , Bibliography of geology of 30, 223 

— , Carboniferous of 30, 208 

— , Climatic conditions of 30, 337 

— , Cretaclous of 30, 221 

— , Devonian of 30, 207 

— east coast, Elevation during the Miocene of the 22, 197 

— , Economic geology of 30, 223 

outlines of 30, 323 

—, Geological map of 28, 127 ; 29, 69, 98 ; 30, 189 

— , Maps of 30, 197 

— , Minerals of 30, 324 

— , Mining laws of 30, 334 

— , New minerals from the Favas of 23, 37, 728 

— , Outlines of geology of 30, 189 

— , Paleozoic of 30, 204 

— , Permian of 30, 211 

— , Permo-carbonic conglomerates of south 21, 30, 779 

— , Petrography of 30, 222 

— , Reference to glaciation in 26, 31 

— , Report of Committee on Publication of map of 30, 76 

— , Silurian of 30, 207 

— , Stratlgraphic geology of 30, 203 

— , Tertiary of 30. 221 

— f Triassic of 30, 220 

of travels on 30, 335 

— , Works on general geology of 30, 199 

physical geography of 30, 198 

Bbigham, a. P., cited on glacial phenomena in Hudson and Mohawk 

valleys : 26, 70 

— ; Principles in the determination of boundaries 30, 105 

Bbeaks, Referred to by Schuchert 27, 497 

Breccia, Occurrence *of intraf ormational 27, 93 

Brecciation effects In the Saint Louis limestone ; Francis M. Van Tuyl 27, 122 

Brenchlet, J. L., cited on Island cascades 29, 545 

Bretz, J. H. ; Pleistocene of western Washington 26, 131 

Brewer, W. H., cited on sedimentation 28, 906 

Brewertoit shale 29, 349 

Brewster, Sir David, cited on fundamental laws of the optical l)ehavior 

of glass 26, 283 

Bridge, T. W., cited on accessory organs of respiration 27, 422 

— , Reference to "Fishes" by 27, 408, 422 



36 J. STANLEY-BROWN INDEX TO VOLUMES 21 TO 30 

Page 

Bbidgeb Eocene of North America and oriental Tupaiidie 24, 249 

Bbidoes, natural. Sec Natural bridges. 

Bbidgman, p. W., cited on pressure on sealed hollow cylinders of glass 26, 187 

Bbioham, a. p., F. V. Emerson introduced by 27, 93 

— , The Mohawk glacial lobe 22* 64, 183. 725 

— , Reference to "Index to the Pacific Islands'* by 27, 333 

— , Study of the Pleistocene of the Broadalbin quadrangle of 22, 185 

BWGHAM, W. T., cited on Hawaiian Islands 28,270,275,276,503 

— quoted on Hawaii volcanoes 24, 577 

Brighton, Ck)Loi7£L, cited on topographic mapping 30, 400 

Bristol, Virginia, Reference to limestone region of 21, 331 

British America, Pillow lavas of 25. 611 

— Association for the Advancement of Science, Reference to Winnipeg 

meeting of •. 21, 407 

— Columbia, Deformation of the coast region of 26, 406 

, Lower Ordoviclan at Glenogle 24, 52 

, Natural bridge across Kicking Horse River, near Field 21, 321 

, New species of Ficus from the interglacial deposits of the Kootenay 

Valley 26, 150 

, Stratigraphlc succession of the Cambrian faunas in the Rocky 

Mountains of 24, 52 

— Isles, Geography in Devonian time of , 27, 382 

in Devonian time. Map of 27, 347 

, Pillow lavas of 26, 601 

Britton, N. L., cited on Staten Island geology 28, 300 

Bbitz, J. H., introduced by R. D. Salisbury 28, 170 

— ; Satsop formation of Washington and Oregon 28, 170 

Broadhead, G. C, Memorial of 30t 13 

Brock, R. W., cited in Sutton memorial 27, 35 

on war geology 30, 171 

— , Director of the Geological Survey of Canada, Reference to 23, 371 

Brogoer, W. C, cited on akerite 27, 206-209 

analyses 27, 207 

allanite ^ 28, 466 

Euloma-Niobe fauna 27, 596 

metamorphism 28, 407 

minerals of syenite-pegmatite 28, 879 

monzonite 27, 204 

Norway akerites 27, 196 

— elected correspondent 21, 4 

— quoted on Norwegian coast region 22, 145, 158, 167 

— , Reference to akerites of Norway described by 26, 82 

Broili, Ferdinand, quoted on Aapidoaaurua Broili 2I, 259 

Brongniabt, Alexandre, cited on time value of extinct organisms 27,492 

Brontotherium, New method of restoring 26, 140, 406 

— : New Mount in the Yale Museum ; R. S. Lull 28, 214 

Brooklyn channel, Cleveland, Ohio 26, 206 

Brooks, A. H., cited on agriculture in geological reports 26, 161 



BROOKS BROWN 37 

Page 

Brooks, A. H., cited on glaciation in Alaska 21, 725 

military geology 30, 170 

Nasina series of Alaska 25» 186 

Nation River formation of Alaska 26i 199 

Reserve Corps 30, 400-401 

Upper Devonian shales and cherts of Alaska 25, 196 

— , Geological work in Alaska by 25, 180 

— , Memorial of Charles W. Hayes by 28, 81 

— and KiXDL£, E. M., Reference to "Paleozoic and associated rocks on 

the Upper Yukon, Alaska," of 27, 701 

Bbooks, C. G. p., cited on climatic changes 26, 541 

Bboom, R., Comments on committee's report on nomenclature of cranial 

elements 28, 973 

— ; Note on the American Triassic genus PlacerffiS lucas 26,^141 

— ; Relations of the American pelycosaurs to the African dinocephalians 

25, 143 

— ; Structure and affinities of the multituberculata 27, 140 

Bbouwes, H. a., cited on atolls 29, 527 

Bbown, a. p., Bibliography of 29, 15 

— , Memorial of 29, 13 

Bbown, Babnum, cited on dinosaur fauna of Lower Edmonton 25, 337 

Lance formation 25, 327 

I^ramie 25, 338 

relation strips of the Edmonton formation 25, 392 

— , Collections from Paskapoo beds by 25, 388-389 

— ; Correlation of the ITpper Cretaceous in Montana and Alberta 28, 216 

— , Cretaceous-Eocene correlation in New Mexico, Wyoming, Montana, 

Alberta 25, 355 

— , Discoveries of extinct land vertebrate fauna in Cuba by 24, 118 

— , Discussion of mastodon by 28, 211 

symposium papers by 25, 130 

— , Reference to symposium papers of 25, 130 

investigations by 25, 323 

— and O'CoNNELL, Mabjobie; Discovery of the Oxfordian in western 

Cuba 30, 152 

Bbown, C. H,, Remarks on ripple-marks by 28, 162 

Bbown, C. W., Remarks on geological education of engineers by 28, 138 

— and Hawkins, A. C. ; Basic rocks of Rhode Island : their correlation 

and relationships 26, 92 

Bbown, B. W., cited on recent researches on the moon 26, 184 

Bbown, H. T., cited on plant development 30, 549 

Bbown, N. H., cited on fossils from Amsden formation 29, 310 

— , Reference to amphibian skulls collected in the Popo Agie beds qf 

Wyoming by 26, 220 

Bbown, T. C, cited on color of High Falls shale 27, 538 

decomposition of marine algie 25, 271 

the Shawangunk 27, 534, 535, 537 

thickness of sandstone at High Falls 27, 541 



38 J. STANLEY-BROWN INDEX TO VOLUMES 21 TO 30 

Pace 

Browit, T. C, Condensed account of Rondout Valley rocks from 27, 542 

— , Discussion of Adirondack geology by 25, 47 

— elected to Paleontological Society 25, 134 

— ; Evolution of tbe Antbozoa and tbe systematic position of Paleozoic 

corals 26, 157 

— ; Importance of '*coral reefs'* and reef deposits in tbe formation of 

Paleozoic limestones 27, 1^7 

— ; Notes on tbe origin of certain Upper Cambrian and Lower Ordo- 

vician sediments of Center County, Pennsylvania 24, 112 

— ; Origin of oolites and tbe oolitic texture of rocks 25, 58, 745 

— , Paleontological notes discussed by 24, 100 

— , Referent»e to article on Silurian sections by 27, 540 

Brown, W. G., Analyses by 27, WO-642 

— cited on allanite 4 28, 477 

Browning and Black foot quadrangles, Montana, Remnants of peneplains 

in 24, 532, 566 

BrIxkner, Eouard, cited on variations of glaciers 28, 825 

— , Reference to 35-year cycle of 25. 563 

Brumbt, , Reference to assistance rendered Sir Cbarles Lyell 25, 163 

Brun, Albert, quoted on volcanic activity 24, 574 

Brun*s b>'iK>tbesis on volcanoes cited 26, 375 

Bryan, Kirke, cited on war geology v 30, 171 

Bryant, H. C. ; Vertebnite fauna of tbe Triassic limestones at Cow 

Creek, Sbasta County, C4iIifornia 25. 155 

Bryant, W. L., elet»ted to Paleontological Society 25, 134 

— and HvssAKOF, L. ; Fisb fauna of tbe conodont bed (basal Genesee) 

at Elgbteen-mile Creek, New York 2B, 154 

Bryozoa, Age. babits, and distribution of 22. 252-257 

— , Origination of 22, 252 

— . Tbe relations to paleogeograpby of Paleozoic ; E. O. Ulrich 22, 93, 252 

BrcHANAN. J. Y., Reference to work of J6S, 738 

Richer, W. A. ; Study of ripple-marks 27, 109 

BrcHER, W. H., Discussion of loess by 20, 73 

— ; **(»iant ripples'* as lndi«itors of palettgeograpby 28, 161 

— : Inorganic production of oolitic structures 20, 103 

Bi'CKLEY, E, R„ Bibliograpb>- of 24, 47 

— cited on dolomite 28, 438 

— . Memoir of : H. A. Buebler 21, 44 

— : On tbe building and ornamental stones of Wistnmsin, Referent^e to. 22. 149 

— quoted on a natural bridge In Miller l^'ounty, Missouri 21, 333 

tbe direi*tions of joints 22, 149 

Bi'CKi^Y, S. B.. Reference to get>logii*al work of 25, 166 

Buck MAX, S. S., cited on correlation of tbe Morrisim formation.. 29.248,257 

— , Reference to Antar\*tic fossil Bracbiof^oda of 22, 258 

BroDiNon^x. A. F. : Reoounaissam>e of tbe Algimkian nx'ks of si»utbe«st 

Newfoundland 25, 40 

Bi U1UUL H. A., oiteil on dolomite 3g^ 43g 

— elected Fellow ^-^^ 3 



BUEHLER — BUTLER 39 

Page 

Bttehleb, H. a. ; Memoir of Ernest Robertson Buckley 24, 44 

BuFFAix) Gap, South Dakota, Natural bridge at 21, 320 

— Society of Natural Science Museum, Catalogue of fossil fishes in the 26, 154 

Bulbous budding, Theory of origin of pillow lavas by 25, 646 

Bun. Lake Creek rock slide in the Wind River Mountains of Wyoming ; 

B. B. Branson 28, 347 

BuiJ£TiN, Change of issue to quarterly 21, 18 

— , Cost of 21, 36 

— , Distribution of 21, 35, 36 ; 23, 38 ; 26, 5 

— , Sales of 21, 34, 36 ; 22, 57 ; 23, 38 

— , Statistical data concerning 24, 4, 7 

BuNSEN, R. W., cited on metamorphism 28, 407 

obsidian analysis 26, 262 

Bubchabd; E. F., cited on oolitic iron ores 25, 769 

BuscKHABDT, Cabl, Cited on geologic climates 30, 520 

Mesozoic fossils 29, 601 

Bubo, L., cited on climatic pulsations 25, 532-533 

Bubgess, J. A., and Eakle, A. S. ; Occurrence of the Halogen salts of 

silver at Tonopah, Nevada 21, 791 

Buried gorge of the Hudson River and geologic relations of Hudson 

syphon of the Catskill aqueduct ; W. O. Crosby 25, 89 

Bubling, L. D. ; Cambrian and related Ordovician brachiopoda — a study 

of their inclosing sediments 26, 137, 421 

— cited on Cambrian fossils from Alaska 25, 193 

— ; Criteria of attitude in bedded deposits^ 28, 208 

— , Discussion of method of measuring post-Glacial time by 28, 141 

new paleogeographic maps by 25, 136 

— ; Ijower Ordovician at Glenogle, British Columbia 24, 52 

Paleozoic section of the Alaska- Yukon boundary 25, 137 

— , Mesozoic and Cenozoic fishes discussed by 23, 86 

— ; New species of the Mesonacldie, with twenty-nine rudimentary seg- 
ments posterior to the fifteenth 27, 158 

— , The Ozarkian fauna discussed by 23, 84 

— , Paleozoic fishes discussed by 23, 86 

— , Remarks on Montana phosphate deposits by 2T, 62 

— ; Stratigraphy of the Canadian Cordillera 2T, 158 

— and Dbysdale, C. W. ; Rocky Mountains section in the vicinity of 

Whitemans Pass 29, 145 

BuBMA, Oil fields of 28,563,565 

BuBNiNQ Springs, Structure of northern portion, volcano anticline in 

Pleasants, Wood, and Ritchie counties. West Virginia ; F. G. Clapp 

21, 23, 769 

BuBBOuoHS, John, cited on damage to Muir glacier by Alaskan earth- 

• quake of 1899 21, 368 

BuBWASH, E. M. ; Chalk, fiints, and ground- water of northern France. . 30, 389 

— ; Subterranean "chalk streams" of northern France 30, 91 

BuTLEB, G. M. ; Plea for uniformity and simplicity in iwtrologic nomen- 
clature 26, 134 



40 J. STANLEY-BROWN INDEX TO VOLUMES 21 TO 30 

Pase 

BuTLEB, N. M., cited on individual liberty 28, 241 

Butte, Montana, Replacement of earlier sulphide minerals by later sul- 
phides at 26.402 

Bttttebwobth, E. M. ; Supplementary data bearing on the composition 

and age of the Thousand Creek Pliocene fauna 28, 226 

Butts, Charles ; Contributions to the black shale problem 24, 113 

— ; Mississlppian section in west-central Kentucky 27, 155 

— , The Ozarkian fauna discussed by 23, 84 

— , Reference to Warren folio by 25, 216 

BuwALDA, J. P., Excursion of California meeting, August 12, 1915, in 

charge of 26, 417 

— ; Faunal zones of the San Pablo formation east of Walnut Creek, 

near Mount Diablo, California 24, 130 

— introduced by A. C. La wson 26, 403 

— ; Mammalian fauna of the Pleistocene beds at Manlx, in the Mohave 

Desert region 25, 156 

— ; New Miocene mammalian fauna from the Tehachapi region 27, 170 

— , Remarks on geology of portions of western Washington by 26, 397 

— ; Structure of the southern Sierra Nevada 26, 403 

Byebs Hall, Yale University, Annual address of President delivered in. 24, 54 
By-laws, Amendments to 21, 19 ; 22, 52 ; 25, 49 

— and constitution 21,42-48; 25,93-97; 30, 131 

of Paleontological Society 2I, T7-82 

— , Life commutation amendment to 22, 53 

Byrnk, p., Reference to "Marble formations of the Cahaba River in 

Alabama" by 27, 437 



Caballos Peak, Thrust plane in, figure showing 2I, 557 

— range. Old and young tectonics of, figure showing 21, 557 

Cabeix, J. A., cited on allanite 28, 477 

CabOts Head section, Ontario 25, 319 

shale 25, 280 

Cacifps- a^pidcphorits. Description of 21, 253-277 

^ Genus and species new 21, 253 

, Restoration of 21, 278-280 

— . Desmosphondylus ; New genera of Permian vertebrates; S. W. Wil- 

"ston .^ 21, 75, 249-283 

Cadell, H. M., cited on experimental geology 29 175 

oil in igneous rocks 28, 592 

Cahokia group of mounds. Monks Mound largest of 26 74 

Cairxes, D. D^ Bibliography of 29 19 

— cited on geological succession of Upper Missouri section... 27.676-679,682 

the Racquet group of Alaska 25 198 

tillites on Alaskan boundary 27 185 

— : Differential erosion and equi plana tion in i^ortious of Yukon and 

'^'«^« 23,48,333.315 



C AIRNE8 C ALIFORN I A 41 

Page 
Cairnes, D. D.^ Geological section along the Yukon->Alaska boundary be- 
tween Yukon and Porcupine rivers 24, 52, 679 

line between Yukon and Alaska rivers 26, 179 

— , Memorial of 29, 17 

— , Reference to "Moose Mountain district of southern Alberta" of... 27,676 

Gaibns, F. I., Description and analysis of minerals by 25, 467 

Calamites Inomatus Dawson, Characters of 23, 88 

Calavebas-Sunol fault, San Jos^ and Mount Hamilton 24, 96 

Galcabeous algse from the Silurian ; F. Berckbeimer 25, 137 

— sediments and eruption, Table showing field association of alkaline 

and subalkaline 21, 92-107 

, Association with alkaline rocks of 21, 91 

CALCEOCKiNiDiK, Term Cremacrinidsc now used instead of 24, 109 

"Cajjcifebous" formations of the Mohawk Valley, Age of; E. O. Ulrlch 

and H. P. Gushing 21, 30, 780 

Calcite, Relation of dolomite to 27, 447 

Calcium and magnesium metasilicate, Diagram showing relation be- 
tween, figure 7 21, 172 

— carbonate, Factors afl!ectlng deposition of 27, 49 

, Relation of bacteria to deposition of ; Karl F. Kellerman 26, 58 

Calhoun, F. H. H., elected Fellow 21, 3 

— , Memorial of P. H. Mell 30, 43 

— quoted on pre- Wisconsin drift 24, 547, 548 

till formed by Belly River Glacier 24, 558 

— , Reference to his paper "The Montana lobe of the Keewatln ice-sheet" 

28, 688 ; 24, 634 

Califoknla., Astoria series of 28, 227 

— , Cenozoic Echlnoids of 28, 228 

— , Charts of climatic changes in 25, 530 

— Coast Range region, Heave fault-slipping in the 26, 404 

— , Contact metamorphic minerals in 25, 125 

— , Corals from Cretaceous and Tertiary of 27, 174 

— , Correlation of the Lower Eocene of 26, 415 

— .Cretaceous and Tertiary stratigraphy of the Santa Inez Mountains 

of 29^164 

floras compared with those of other Cretaceous areas 26, 414 

invertebrate faunas. Correlation of 26, 414 

Tertiary, Contact In 25, 343 

— earthquake of 1906, Reference to 21, 342 

— earthquakes, A synthetic study of recorded shocks of 21, 791 

—, Eleventh Annual Meeting of CordlUeran Section, held at Berkeley. 21,789 

— , Eocene divisions of 30, 154 

of San Pedro Point 24, 126 

the Coallnga-Cautua district 24, 127 



f Stewartsville group in 29, 94 

— , Extinct vertebrate faunas from 29, 154 

— , Fauna in the Cretaceous of southern 27, 174 

of 28,234 



42 J. STANLEY-BROWN INDEX TO VOLUMES 21 TO 30 

Page 

Caufobnia, Fauna of tbe Etchegoin Pliocene of middle 28» 229 

Lower Monterey of Contra Ck)sta County 26, 167 

Tejon group in Coallnga quadrangle 27, 173 

— , Faunal geography of the BJocene of 26, 416 

relations of the Upper Neocene In the Sargent oil fields of 24, 129 

zones of the San Pablo formation 24, 130 

— , Geological section of coast ranges, San Luis Obispo County 24, 93 

— , Geology of a portion of the Santa Ynez River district, Santa Barbara 

County 26, 401 

— , Glaciation on the northern coast ranges of 25, 120 

— , Gold in granodiorite of 25, 124 

— , Jurassic age of slates at Slate Springs ; 24, 131 

— , Marine Oligocene of 29, 297 

— , Martinez Eocene of 25, 154 

— , Meganus group of the Eocene of 29, 281 

— , Method of determining age of Tertiary formations in 26, 152 

— , Miocene dolphin from 25, 142 

— , Monterey series, Mount Diablo 24, 129 

— , Natural bridge at Santa Cruz 21, 326-327 

— , Note on the Cretaceous Echinoderms of 26, 166 

— , Occurrence of mammal remains in the asphalt beds of McKittrick; 

N. C. Cornwall 26, 167 

Nothrotherium in Pleistocene cave deposits of 28. 233 

— , Oil fields of 28, 567, 568, 577 

— , Pillow lavas of 25, 618 

— , Pinnipeds from Miocene and Pleistocene deposits of 29, 161 

— , Pleistocene mammal fauna near Auburn 27, 169 

— , Pliocene and Pleistocene Foraminifera from 21, 76 

extension of the Gulf of Lower 29, 164 

Jacalitos and Etchgoin formations at C^alinga 27, 172 

— , Recent eruptions of Lassen Peak 26, 105 

— , Reef coral fauna of 28, 200 

— , Relation between Cretaceous and Tertiary of 25, 152 

Oligocene and Eocene in 25, 153 

— , Review of the Miocene and Oligocene faunas of 26, 416 

— , Ruby corundum from 21, 793 

— , San Pablo formation, Mount Diablo 24, 130 

— , Serpentines of the central coast ranges of 21, 793 

— , Siphonalia suttcretisis zone of 29, 163 

— , Stratigraphic and faunal relations of the Martinez and Tejou 24, 127 

— , Stratigraphy and paleontology of .» 28, 225 

— , Structure of Pacific ranges of 30^ 84 

— , Summer Meeting of the Geological Society of America, 1915, held in 26, 389 

— , Tentative correlation table of the Neocene of 26, 167 

— Tertiary formation, Vertebrate fauna in the marine Tertiary signifi- 
cant in determining age of 26, 168 

— , Trachytic i>erlite from Lone Hill, near San Jos6 24, 94 

— , Triassic limestones, Fauna of the 25, 155 



CALIFORNIA CAMBRIAN 43 

Page 

California, Trcfpitidie of the Upper Triasslc of 29, 162 

— , Unconformity at base of the Tamlosoma zone 24, 132 

— , Vaqueros formation of 29, 165 

of southern 25, 153 

— , Variations in rainfall in 25, 121 

Caliiix>bnian gulf basin, Older geologic structures of the 21, 555 

Califomicus, Pavo, Pleistocene species 27, 171 

Calkins, F. C, cited on allanite 28, 466 

— and Taff, J. A., Excursion of California Meeting, August 10, 1915, 

in charge of 26, 408 

Call, R. E., cited on lake shells 28, 369 

Calloposa, Development of 23, 362 

Caobic versus cyclonic form of solar hypothesis 25, 521 

Calumet beach 29, 235 

Calvebt, W. R., cited on erosion surfaces in South Dakota 25, 326 

geology of Indian reservations 25, 350 

Lance formation 25, 330 

stratigraphic relations of Livingston formation 25, 346 

— and Stone, R. W. ; Stratigraphic relations of the Livingston l)eds of 

central Montana 21, 31, 781 

Calvin, Samuel, Aftonian deposits referred to by 21, 120 

mammalian fauna, II 22, 66, 207 

— , Bibliography of 23, 9 

— cited on lowan drift 27, 118 

— , Fossils named in honor of 23, 7 

— ; The lowan drift 22, 65, 729 

— , List of fossils described by 23, 6 

— and Shimek, B., Mingling of Pleistocene formations with the Aftonian 

noted by 23, 709 

Camarasaubus, Amphicoelias, and other sauropods of Cope; 11. F. Os- 

bom and C. C. Mook 30, 379 

— and Amphlcoellas from Caiion City; 11. F. Osborn and C. C. Mook. . 30,151 

— , Pelvis of 27, 151 

— , Skeleton and restoration of. 28, 215 

Camabocrinus, Crinold genus Scypho<^rlnus and Its bulbous root 24, 110 

Camarophoria explanata (McChesney), Figure showing and description 

of 21, 501 

— hamburffensiSf n. sp.. Figure showing and description of 21, 500 

— King 22, 498 

— schlotheimi (Von Buch), Figure showing and description of 21, 499 

Camarotachia chouteauensis, n. sp., Figure of 21, 510 

— Hall and Clarke, General characteristics of 21, 510 

Cambrian and Ordovlclan faunas of southeastern Newfoundland ; G. 

van Ingen 25, 138 

related Ordovlclan brachlopoda — a study of their Inclosing sedi- 
ments ; L. D. Burling 25, 421 

— bacteria , 28, 246 

— (pre-) boundary and the Isobases 21, 245 



44 J. STANLEY-BROWN INDEX TO VOLUMES 21 TO 30 

Pase 

Cambrian brachiopoda, Comparison of lithologic, stratigraphic, and geo- 
graphic range of 25t 428 

— conglomerate 26, 268 

--faunas in the Rocky Mountains of British Columbia, Stratigraphic 

succession of the 24, 52 

— floras 30, 507 

— fossiliferous localities of Diamond Hill-Cumberland district 25, 444 

— of South Attleboro, Massachusetts, Some new fossils from the 21, 76 

western North America ; C. D. Walcott 25, 130 

— rocks of Diamond Hill-Cumberland district 25, 445-446 

— sandstones at Ablemans, Wisconsin, Unconformities in 27, 459 

near Madison, Wisconsin 27, 460 

— sedimentary rocks of Alaska 25, 187 

— (pre-) terrane, Character and distribution of the visible*. 21, 89 

— trilobites, Discovery of antennte and other appendages of Middle. . . . 22, 96 

Camel from the Miocene of Nebraska, A new 22, 95 

CAMEUDiG, Affinities and phylogeny of the extinct 29, 144 

Camp, C. L. ; Extinct toad from Rancho La Brea 26. 167 

— ; Homologies of the borders and surfaces of the Scapulocoracoid in 

reptiles and mammals 28, 216 

— and Merriam, J. C. ; Recent studies on skull structure of Thalatto- 

saurus 27, 171 

Campbell, M. R., cited on Coal Measure sections 30, 586 

Harrisburg peneplain 28, 345 

Pennsylvania peneplains 29, 576 

petroleum 28. 556, 712 

— ; Geographic descriptions of army cantonments and of United States 

boundary regions 30, 106 

— , Piedmont terraces and i)ost- Jurassic history of the northern Ap- 
palachians discussed by .' 24, 70, 695 

— quoted on Hinton formation 23, 451 

Campbell, Robert, cited on Old Red Sandstone 27, 365 

— , Reference to "The Downtonian and Old Red Sandstone of Kincar- 
dineshire" by 27, 366 

Campodus and Edestus remains ; C. R. Eastman 28, 214 

Campophyllum V sp.. Fossil of Wasatch region 2I, 530 

Campton, Kentucky, Natural bridge across Swifts Camp Creek, near. . 21,315 
Camptonite (ourose (?)) in Virginia, Megascopic and microscopic char- 
acter and chemical composition and classification of 24,321-325 

Camseli., Charles, cited on Alberta oil field 28, 725 

— , Memorial of Pelorme D. Cairnes by 29, 17 

Canada, Cretaceous of Alberta 27, 673 

— , Deformation of unconsolidated beds in Ontario 28, 323 

— , Devonic black shale of 26, 137 

— , Edmonton formation of 25, 337 

— , Glacial deposits of Don River, Ontario 26, 205 

— , Mammal-bearing beds of 26, 326 

— , Oil fields of 28, 591, 721 



CANADA CARNEGIE 45 

Page 

Canada, Petroleum supply of 28, 610 

— , Records of Ontario 28, 145 

— , Reference to Royal Society of 21, 91 

— , Richmond formation of Ontario and Quebec in 24, 110 

Canadian and Ozarkian systems, New data on the relations of the ; E. O. 

Ulrich 24, 51 

— extension of Montana phosphate deposits 27, 62 

— Forestry School, Resolution relating to the late Monseigneur La- 

flamme and ', 22,62 

— oil field; W. G. Miller 28,157 

Canal Zone, Geology of 29, 630 

Cancani, a. ; Reference to seismographic studies on Alaskan earth- 
quakes 21, 375 

Canev shale pebbles. Striae of the 23, 459 

— shales at Talihina, Oklahoma 23,50,457-462 

, Brain structures of fossil fishes from the 24, 119 

Canis diruBy Mounted skeleton of 27, 153 

Canton, New York, topographic quadrangle 26, 2S7 

Cantua district, Fauna of Tejon group in 27, 173 

Canu, F. ; Methods of study and the classification of American Tertiary 

bryozoa 28, 204 

— and Bassij:b, R. S. ; Principles of classification of Cyclostome bryozoa 

29, 151 
Canyon and delta of the Copper River in Alaska ; Lawrence Martin 24, 71, 699 

— Diablo, Certain so-called meteoric irons of 24, 54, 677, 685 

Cape Girardeau, Missouri, Crinoids from Ilelderbergian strata near. . . 24, 110 

Capello, Db. , First descent Into Vesuvius crater made by 26, 378 

Capps, S. R., cited on ellipsoidal greenstones 25, ^0 

— and MoFFiT, F. H., Reference to "Geology and mineral resources of 

the Nizlna district, Alaska," of 27, 691-692, 695 

Cabbonates in subalkaline magma. Effects of the solution of 21, 108 

— in southeast New Mexico and western Texas, Notes on the Upper; 

G. B. Richardson 21, 76 

Cabboniitebous climate, Remark of J. B. Woodworth on 23, 462 

— floras 30, 510 

— limestone overthrust, Wasatch range 21, 537 

— of Brazil 30, 208 

— rock formations of Alaska 26, 196 

— shales of Nebraska, Plant tissue in the 24, 113 

— species of "Zaphrentis" ; G. H. Chadwick 29, 154 

— (mid-) strata in the upper valley of Ogden River, Figure showing. . 21, 532 
Cabibbean arc. Reference to 29, 621 

— Islands, Reference to 29, 620 

— , MoUusca of 29, 148 

Cabman, J. E. ; Grooved and striated contact plane between the Ne- 

braskan and Kansan drifts 23, 47, 735 

— ; Nebraskan drift of the Little Sioux Valley in northwest Iowa. . 23, 47, 735 
Cabneoie expedition cited on deposits of eastern China 21, 639 



46 J. STANLEY-BROWN INDEX TO VOLUMES 21 TO 30 

Page 

Cabneoie Institute, Complimentary "smoker" given by 22, 55 

, Vote of thanks to the Board of Trustees of 22, 68 

— Institution of Washington, Support from 21, 142 

— Museum, Skeletons in 27. 153 

Carney, Frank, cited on glacial erosion on Kellys Island, Ohio 26, 70 

— , Discussion of glacial deposits in Ontario by 25, 72 

on isobases of the Algonquin an^ Iroquois beaches by 21, 21 

— ; Lake Maumee, in Ohio 22, 65, 726 

— ; Shorelines of the glacial lakes in the Oberlin quadrangle, Ohio. 21,21, 762 

Carnivora and Rodentia ; W. D. Mathew 23, 85, 182-187 

Caroline natural bridge, Utah, Diagram showing origin of. Figure 3. . 21,318 
Carpenter, Franklin R., Memoir of (with bibliography), by H. O. 

Hofman 22, 48 

Carpenter, W. M., Geological work in Ijouisiana of 25, 172 

Carrizo Creek beds, Mollusca of 29, 148 

Carroll district, Glacial features of 27, 283 

, Outline map of 27, 281 

— moraine field and outwash plains 27, 278 

, General description of 27, 279 

, Outline map of ! 27, 281 

, Southward movement of outwash of 27, 280 

, T\%'o views of origin of 27, 279 

Carruthers, D., cited on inclosed lakes of Mongolia 25, 562 

Carter, ; Determination of elevations of Maine areas of fossils.. 28,309 

Carter, T. Lane, quoted on the rock of Pis- Pis district, Nicaragua .... 23, 497 
Cartersville potash slates: their economic relation to chemical and 

industrial post-war development ; T. P. Maynard 30, 112 

Case, E. C, Alisphenoid and Lachryma in vertebrates discussed by. . . 24, 118 

— cited on Limestone Mountain 27, 94, 99 

Permian elements 30, 593 

— ; Evidence of climatic oscillation in the Permo-Carboniferous beds of 

Texas 25, 41 

— made member of Committee on Nomenclature 28, 973 

— ; Paleozoic reptiles and Amphibia, a comparison of old and new world 

forms 23, 86, 200 

— ; Red Beds between Wichita Falls, Texas, and Las Vegas, New Mex- 
ico, in relation to their vertebrate faunas 24, 52, 679 

— , Remarks on anthropoids by 27, 150 

origin of sternum by , 27, 152 

Ornithomimus 27, 151 

policy of Vertebrate Section by 27, 153 

skull elements in the Tetrapoda 27, 152 

Case, W. II., cited on recession of Muir glacier 21, 368 

Casiano petroleum wells. Records of 24, 256 

Castle Rock conglomerate ; 23, 270 

CASTORiDiG, Outline of the history of the ; W. P. Taylor 26, 157 

Catahoula floras of North America 20, 633 

Cataldo quartzlte, Application of term 23, 527 



CATARACT — CEPHALOPOD8 47 

Page 
Cataract formation related to the Sexton Creek limestone 27» 313 

— formations in Ontario, Contacts of the [plate 14] 25, 287 

of New York and Ontario 25, 277 

— , Medina and Clinton, Contact between 26, 292 

— ; A new formation at the base of the Siluric in Ontario and New 

York ; Charles Schuchert 24, 107 

— , Relation to other Siluric faunas of the 25, 290 

— Sea, Paleogeography of 25, 295 

— section, Ontario 26, 317 

Catesby, M., Geological work in Florida of 26, 174 

"Catinoa," Definition of 22, 193 

— limestone. Age of the 22, 204 

, An older 22, 198 

, Origin of 22, 192, 203 

Catskill, Angular unconformity at 24, 50, 676 

— Aque<luct, Geologic relations of Hudson syphon of the 26, 88 

, Geological investigations of 28, 174 

light from the 24, 74, 711 

— Mountains, Divergent ice-flow on the plateau northeast of the 26, 68 

, Local glaciation in the 28, 133, 136, 543 

— sedimentation 21, 286 

Catskills, Rectilinear features of 27, 107 

C-attell, J. McKeen, Conference papers of the First Annual Meeting of 

the Paleoutological Society, published in the Popular Science 

Monthly by 22, 87 

Cause of the absence of water in dry sandstone beds ; R. H. Johnson . . 29, 105 

postglacial deformation of the Ontario region; J. W. Spencer.. 26,65 

Caverns, Edmonson County, Kent, Underground 21, 331 

Cayeux, LuciEN, cited on sea sediments 28, 739 

Cayuga Lake not a rock basin 23, 481 

Cayugan waterlimes of western New York ; G. H. Chadwiek 28, 173 

CearA, Geology of 30, 244 

(^ENOzoic echinoids of California 28, 226 

— floras of equatorial America 29, 129, 631 

— geology of Central America and the West Indies 29, 615 

— history of Central America and the West Indies; T. W. Vaughan.. 29,138 

Wyoming, Notes on the 23, 73 

the Wind River Mountains, Wyoming; L. G. Westgate and E. B. 

Branson 23, 49, 739 

— mammal faunsB, Correlation of ; 24, 290 

Central America, Cenozoic geolog>' of 29, 615 

history of 29,138 

, Climatic changes in 26, 539 

. Flora of 29, 129, 649 

, Mesozoic history of 29, 138, 601 

, Paleozoic history of 29, 129 

, Petroleum supply of 28, 611 

CcpHALOFODS, Fossll 24, 129 



48 J. STANLEY-BROWN — INDEX *rO VOLUMES 21 TO 30 

CEPHAix>Fons, ReRtoration of Paleozoic 25* 136 

Ceratops beds 25, 325 

misnamed 25, 356 

— fauna, Relationsliips of 25, 337 

Cebatopbia ; U. S. Lull 23, 211 

CEBiTHiDiE, Phylogeny of certain 21, 76 

Cernaysien beds of France and Belgium 25, 323 

— fauna 25, 3d5 

Certain aspects of glaciation in Alaska ; W. O. Crosby 30, 115 

Ceylon, Reference to climatic changes in 25, 482 

Chadwick, G. H. ; American diphypbylloid corals 28, 208 

— ; Angular unconformity at Catskill 24, 50, 676 

— ; Carboniferous species of "Zaphrentis" 29, 154 

— , The Cataract discussed by 24, 107 

— ; Cayugan waterlimes of western New York 28, 173 

— cited on Iroquois shores 27, 242 

— ; Color scheme for crystal models 23, 51, 728 

— , Discussion of fossil rock-boring animals by .' 28t 1^9 

Paleozoic rocks by 28, 171 

rlpple-marks by 28, 162 

rock movement by 28, 125 

— , Eurypterid remains in the sandstones of the Normanskill horizon at 

Catskill discovered by 24, 502 

— ; Further studies in the New York Siluric 29, 92 

— , Glacial cirques discussed by 24, 51 

— ; Hypothesis tor the relation of normal and thrust faults in eastern 

New York 28,160 

— , Iroquois bars measured by 27, 247 

— ; Lockport-Guelph section in the barge canal at Rochester, New York 28, 172 

— ; A new Eurypterid horizon 30, 152 

— ; Portage stratigraphy in western New York 30, 157 

— , Post-Glacial earth movements discussed by 24, 74 

— ; Post-Ordovician deformation in the Saint Lawrence Valley, New 

York 26, 115, 287-294 

— ; Rectilinear features in the eastern CatskiUs 27, 107 

— ; Remarkable persistence of thin horizons. ." 30, 157 

— , Remarks on rectilinear features of Adirondacks by 27, 107 

Rochester fauna by 27, 89 

rock foliation by 27, 645 

— ; Stratigraphy of the New York Clinton 29, 327 

— , Thanks rendered to 27, 645 

— and Faibchild, H. L. ; Iroquois and inferior waters in northern New 

York (extempore) 22, 64 

— shales 25, 285 

Chalcocite in the fluospar veins of JeflTerson County, Colorado, primary ; 

Horace B. Patton 2©, g4 

Chalk, flints, and ground-water of northern France ; E. M. Burwash . . 30, 389 
Chalk streams of northern France 30, 91 



• 



CHALMERS CHANGES 49 

Pace 
Chalmers, Robert, cited on interglaeial beds of land and fresh- water 

shells 26, 251 

non-glaciation of Magdalen Islands 26, 84 

Nova Scotia glaciation 29» 224 

marine levels 29, 226 

Saint Lawrence Basin 29, 214-217 

Chamberlin, R. T., cited on duration of Glacial period 28, 812 

— , Discussion of rock movement by 28, 125 

— , Remarks on the structure of the southern Sierra Nevada by 26, 404 

Chamberiiit, T. C, cited on Catskill-glaciation 28, 549 

cause of glaciation 30, 557 

deep-sea deposits found on land 27, 191 

distribution of compensation by a law 26, 180 

emergence of the living 28, 237 

geologic climates 30, 502, 559 

glacial erosion 26, 70 

Keweenaw series 27, 94, 99 

Lower Ordovicic formations 27, 557 

"MayvUle beds" 27,308 

metamorpbism 28, 383 

Newfoundland glaciation 29, 229 

Old Red Sandstone 27,351 

Pennsylvania peneplains 29, 578 

primitive fish 27, 398 

**The shelf seas of the Paleozoic and their relations to diastro- 

phism" of 26, 306 

unicellular forms 28, 246 

— ; The classification of American glacial deposits, Reference to 24, 563 

— quoted on name "Albertan" 24, 564 

— , Reference to Altamont moraine, named by 23, 126 

"On the habitat of the early vertebrates" by 27, 398 

— , Reference to planetesimal faj'pothesis of 21, 226 

— , Term "Toronto formation" given by 21, 439 

— and Salisbury cited on drif tless area of the upiier Mississippi Valley 

21,630,639 

rippling and dune formations 21, 642 

, Reference to their "Drif tless area of the upper Mississippi Val- 
ley" 24, 189 

Sausrurt'b Geology, Reference to 21, 200, 226 

text-book of geology cited on glaciation 26, 109 

Chambers, A. A. ; Analyses of sea dei)osits by 28, 939-940, 942 

Chandler, A. C. ; Antelopes in the fauna of the Rancho La Brea 26, 155 

— ; The bison of Rancho La Brea 27, 170 

Changes In climate of Africa and the Americas 25, 541 

California, Charts of 25, 530 

precipitation 25, 542 

the crystallographical and optical properties of quartz with rise in 

temperature ; F. E. Wright 25, 44 

IV — ^BuLL. Oeol. 80c. Am. 



50 J.STANLEY-BROWN INDEX TO VOLUMES 21 TO 30 

Page 

Channels and lakes near Syracuse, Glacial 21, 21, 701 

— , Southeastern South Dakota and northeastern Nebraska pre- Wis- 
consin 23, 46, 463-470 

Chapman, Fbedebick, Reference to **Notes on the consolidated seolian 

sands of Kathiawar" 21, 647 

Character and restoration of Cope's Sauropoda ; H. F. Osborn 30, 151 

Characteristics of a (X)rrosion conglomerate; F. W. Sardeson 25,39,265 

continental elastics and chemical dei>osits; Eliot Blackwelder. . . 28,162, 

207, 917 

the soil and its relation to geology ; C. F. Marbut 27, 114 

upper part of the till of southern Illinois and elsewhere; E. W. 

Shaw 29, 76 

Charleton formation, Anticostl Island, Composition and thickness of. 21,697 

, Correlation of 21, 699 

, Zones and fossils of , 21, 6J>7-699 

Oharnockite, Comparison with hypersthene syenite of 27, 218 

— series, Analyses of rocks of 27, 218 

Chart of cloudiness and temi>erature anomalies 26, 582-583 

comparative stormlness during period of maximum and minimum 

sun-spots 25, 545-546 

distribution of loess by De Martonne 25, 575 

European stormlness during sun-spot changes 25, 516, 518, 520 

historic changes in precipitation 25, 542 

major and minor sun-spot cycles 26, 554 

storm belt of the United States 26, 570 

Ohatard, T. M. ; Analyses of oolitic sand from Great Salt Lake by... 25,758 

Chattanooga shales 27, 465 

, Location, thickness, and age of black 24, 113 

Chattanoooan series, Kinderhookian age of the 26, 96, 155 

Chazy formation in the Ottawa Valley, Paper read by Percy E. Ray- 
mond 22, 62, 719 

, Mingan series. Thickness of 21, 688 

Ohelonia j Oliver P. Hay 23, 212 

Chelonioidea, Bibliography of 23, 219 

Chelydrosauria, a suborder of temnospondyte ami)hil>lans from the Texas 

Permian, Principal character of the ; S. W. Williston 21, 75 

Chemical and mlneraloglcal composition of meteorites ; George P. Mer- 
rill 27, 50 

organic deposits of the sea ; T. W. Vaughan 28, 163, 207, 933 

— composition and classiflcatiou of hypersthene syenite 27, 202 

of Triassic diabase 27, 639 

Chester, II. II., Description and analysis of minerals by 25, 467 

Chester controversy ; E. O. Ulrich 27, 157 

— group of Illinois and Kentucky, Succession of 27, 156 

CniRouGAMAN TCglon, Quebec, Canada, The geology of the ; Alfred Ernest 

Barlow 22, 67, 738 

Chico and Martinez beds, Unconformity between 20, 293 

— time or Cretaceous 27, 513 



CHICOTTE CLAPP 51 

Page 

Chicotte formation, Anticosti Island 21, 715, 716 

section ceases witli 21, 716 

, Correlation of 21, 715 

, Fossils of 21, 715 

, Location, composition, and thickness ^f 21, 715 

, Zones and faunas of 21, 715, 716 

Chile. Tertiary fossillferous horizons of 29, 642 

Chimney Hill formation, Oklahoma 26, 75 

China, Coal deposits of 28, 130 

resources of 24, 93 

— , Dust storms in 24, 92 

— , Petroleum supply of 28, 614 

Chini£ formation 30, 496 

Chifola Kiver, Florida, Dead lake of the 27, 109 

CuoBDATES, History of 27, 391 

Chbistiania region, Lower Ordovicic of 27, 609 

Chbistie, W. a. K., cited on salt deposits 29. 474 

Chiustman, E., cited on titanotheres 25, 406 

Chrono£X)gy and correlation on the basis of paleogeography ; Charles 

Schuchert 26, 411 

— in geology based on paleogeography 27, 411 

— . Rise of 27, 491 

Chuqach Mountains, Alaska, Height of 21, 343 

Chupadera mesa, New Mexico, ancient tectonics of, Figure showing.. 21,558 
Cincinnati anticline 28, 636 

— meeting, 1881, "Cirtfular letter'* to geologists of America sent from. 21,741 

— system, Anticosti Island 21, 694 

Cirques and rock-cut terraires. Mount Toby 22, 681 

— in White Mountains, Absence of 27, 276 

— , Limited occurrence in White Mountains of 27, 290 

— near Mount Washington, Glacial 24, 51, 677 

Claoqet formation 26, 340 

Claiborne Eocene flora 29, 633 

Clairaut's and Stokes* theorems on density of earth compared 26, 175 

Clapp, C. H., cited on Maine fossils 28, 320 

Pleistocene 28, 316 

— ; Contra-imposed shorelines 24, 72, 699 

— ; Deformation of the coast region of British Columbia 26, 406 

— , Determination of Maine fossils by 28, 309 

— , Reference to "Southern Vancouver Island" of 27, 709 

— , Rocks near Strathcona, Vancouver Island, Canada, named Sutton 

limestone and Wark diorite by 26, 82 

— and Shimer, H. W., Reference to "The Sutton Jurassic of the Van- 

couver group, Vancouver Island," of 27, 709 

Clapp, F. G., cited on New Brunswick oil fields 28. 725 

England glacial period 21, 430 

oil and gas 28,558 

peneplains 29, 581 



52 J. STANLEY-BROWN— INDEX TO VOLUMES 21 TO 30 

Page 

Clapp, F. G., cited on sand-plains 30, 622 

— , Ethics of the petroleum geologist 28, 157 

— ; Notes on the geological relations of oil pools situated in regions of 

monoclinal structure 22, 67, 737 

— ; Occurrence of petroleum associated with faults and dikes 23, 51, 728 

— ; Present and future of natural gas fields in the northern Appalachians 

21, 34, 788 
— , Revision of structural classification of petroleum and natural gas 

fields 28, 158, 553 

— ; Some instances of flowing wells on anticlines 21. 2^, 770 

— ; Structure of the northern portion of the Burning Springs volcano 
anticline, in Pleasants, Wood, and Ritchie counties, West Virginia 

21. 23, 769 

Glabk, a. H., Acknowledgments to 28. 433 

Gi<ABK, B. L., An Apalachi(X)la fauna from Lower California 28, 223 

— ; Astoria series (Oligoceue) in the region of Mount Diablo, California 

28,227 

— cited on San Lorenzo fauna i 29, 306 

— , Discussion of peneplain dating by 29, 89 

— ; Ek)cene divisions of California 30, 154 

— ; Fauna of the Meganos group 29, 152 

— ; Fauna of the Scutella brexceriana zone of the tTpper Monterey series 

26, 151 

San Pablo series 25, 152 

— ; Faunal zones of the Oligocene 29, 166 

— ; Meganos group, a newly recognized division in the Eocene of Cali- 
fornia 29, 281 

— , Remarks on pisolites at San Antonio, Texas, by 26, 398 

the Etchegoin Sea by 24,129 

— ; Review of the Miocene and Oligowne faunas of California 26, 416 

— , San Pueblo formation on the north side of Mount Dial)lo, California 24, 130 
— ; Stewartsville group, a newly recognized division in the EJocene of 

California 29, 94 

— , Structure of the Sierra Nevada l)edrock complex discussed by 24, 98 

— ; Tentative correlation table of the Neocene of California 26, 167 

— , Ventura County oil fields discussed by 24, 98 

— and Arnold, Ralph; Marine Oligocene of the West Coast of North 

America 29, 153, 297 

Lawson, a. C, Excursion of California Meeting, August 9, 1915. in 

charge of 26, 407, 417 

Clark, C. V. ; Ix)wer and Middle Cambrian faunas of the Mohave Desert 

28,230 

Clark, J. D., cited on gel molecules 29, 599 

— , introduceil by C. F. Tolman, Jr 26, 394 

— ; R61e of colloidal migration in ore deposits 26, 394 

Clark, P. E., Reference to article on Silurian sections by 27, 540 

Clark, R. B. ; Fauna of the Lower Monterey, Contra (>)sta County, Cali- 
fornia 26, 167 



CLARK CLARKE 53 

Page 

Clark, W. B., Bibliography of 29, 24 

— , chairman of Committee on Formation of Paleontologlcal Society, Re- 
port by 21, 16 

— cited on Potomac Invertebrate fauna 26, 345 

— ; Contribution to morphology from paleontology 21, 74 

— elected Treasurer 21,3; 22, 3; 23, 2; 24, 9; 25,5; 

26, 11 ; 27, 11 ; 28, 12 
— , Memorial of 29, 21 

— on Committee on Correspondentship 23, 35 

— , Reference to deep-sea deposits in annual report of 21, 644 

war work of 30, 183 

— , Report of Treasurer 21, 37 ; 22, 58 ; 23, 40 ; 24, 5 ; 25, 53 ; 

26,8; 27,7; 28,8 
Clabke, F. W., Analyses of Salt Lake water by 25, 754-755 

— cited on allanite 28, 468 

analyses of sea deposits 28, 938 

chemical denudation 28, 819, 835 

deposition 28, 739 

data of geochemistry 28, 896 

estimates of geologic time 28, 817 

measurement of geologic time 28, 754 

melting points of minerals 29, 411 

metamorphism 28, 386 

oolites 25, 759 

— , Reference to his "Data of Geochemistry" 21, 111 

Clarke, J. M., acted as toastmaster 27, 60 

— , Address by at Dana centenary ; Dana the zoologist 24, 68 

— ; Causes producing scratched, impressed, fractured, and recemented 

pebbles in ancient conglomerates 26, 60 

— , Chairman of First Section 26, 90 

— cited on Albion formation 25, 286 

Devonian sandstone 28, 834 

Eurypterlds in the Shawaugunk 27, 633 

geologic climates 30, 510, 546 

Ithaca beds 30, 445. 449 

New York faunal provinces 30, 468 

non-glaciation of Magdalen Islands 25, 84 

replacement of Onondaga limestone 28, 741 

Shawangunk correlated with Pittsford shale 27, 534, 535 

Sherburne sandstone 30, 424-426 

Silurian formations in New York 27, 544 

TuUy limestone 28,953,957 

— ; Correlation of Paleozoic faunas discussed by 23, 83 

— , Delta deposits discussed by 23, 48, 744 

— , Development of the Monticuliporoids discussed by 23, 64 

— , Discussion of Acadian Triassic by 26, 94 

classification of aqueous habitats by 26, 158 

coastal subsidence by 25, 62 



54 J. STANLEY-BROWN INDEX TO VOLUMES 21 TO 30 

Page 
Clabke, J. M., Discussion of need for study of sedimentary rock compo- 
sition by aO, 85 

Paleozoic faunas by 25, 135 

stratigraphy about Three Forks, Montana, by 26, 157 

Sbawangunk formation of Medina age by 26, 150 

Silurian system of Ontario by 25, 41 

on ancient man by 26. 149 

— elected President of the Paleontological Society 21, 71 

— ; Illustrations of intraformational corrugation 25, 37 

recent exposure of Saratoga Springs 25, 38 

— ; Isolation in paleontology 21, 74 

— , Member of Auditing Committee 26, 11 

— , Memoir of J. C. K. I^flamme by 22, 4 

Robert Parr Whitfield by 22, 22 

~, Memorial of William Bullock Clark by 29, 21 

Horace Carter Ilovey by 26, 21 

— , Middle Cambrian crustaceans discussed by 23, 84 

— , Motion instructing Secretary to send telegraphic reply to President 

Gilbert by 21, 27 

— , Oriskany sandstones of Ontario discussed by 23, 83 

— ; Paleontology of a voracious api)etite 23, 83 

— ; Philosophical aspei*ts of paleontology 30, 150 

— ;The philosophy of geology and the order of the State, Presidential 

address by 28, 159, 205, 235 

— ; Phylogenetic development of the Hexastinellid dyctyottpongca as in- 
dicated by the ontogeny of an Upper Devonian species 25, 138 

— ; Pic D'Aurore section 26, 150 

— , Reference to speech at dinner by 25, 80 

war work of 30, 176 

— ;The relation to the strand-line of the Paleozoic arthropods 22,94,279 

— , Remarks on corals by 26, 147 

memorial of Orvllle A. Derby by 27, 146 

Old Red Sandstone by 27, 40 

— , Rei)ort of the Geology Committee of the National Research Council 

by chairman 29, 69 

— , retiring President of Paleontological Society, Reference to address 

of , 22, 53, 63, 92 

— ; Strand and undertow records of Upper Devonian time as indi(!ations 

of the prevailing climate 29, 83 

— ; Stromatopora growth on edge-on conglomerate from the Silurian. . 30, 157 

— , Toastmaster at annual dinner 23, 46 

— ; Type of rifted relict mountain, or rift-mountain 26, 90 

— and Mattheh', W. D. ; Peccaries of the Pleistocene of New^ York. . . 26, 150 

RuEDEMANN, RuDOLPH ; Mode of life of the Eurypterida 21, 76 

, Monograph on the Eurypterida presented to the Paleontological 

Society by 24, 10(5 

Clabke and Schuchert, Cayugau series of 21, 680 

Clarke's comiwsite analysis of 345 limestones, Reference to 22, 191 



CLAKKE's CLIMATE 55 

Page 

Clarke's "Data of Geochemistrj'," Citations from 24, 233 

Classification and phylogeny of the Reptilia ; S. W. WiUiston 28, 216 

— of American Tertiary bryozoa 28, 204 

arkose deposits 27. 115 

marine deposits ; A. W. Grabau 24, 74 

metamorphic rocks ; W. J. Miller 28, 155, 451 

natural water ; Chase Palmer 24, 73 

petroleum and natural gas fields 28, 553 

the Tetraseptata, with some remarks on parallelism in development 

in this group : a study in orthogenesis ; Amadeus W. Grabau ... 27, 148 

Clastic sediments, Mechanical composition of 25, 655 

Clastics, Marine 28, 207 

Claypole, E. W., cited on the WhirU)ool-Saint Davids Valley 21, 434 

Clays in Pennsylvania, White 30, 96 

— , Laminated lake 27, 81 

— of the United States 30, 95 

Cleaveland, p., Coastal plain geology by 26, 160 

Cleland, II. F., appointed on Auditing Committee 30, 146 

— cited on the genus Rhipidomella 21, 299 

— elected Secretary of Paleontologieal Society, 1910 21, 72 

— ; Memorial of II. S. Williams 30, 47 

— ; Natural bridges of North America 21, 22, 314-338, 765 

— quoted on formation of Yellowstone natural bridge 21, 323 

Massachusetts natural bridge 21, 328 

— . Remarks on lake clays by 27, 82 

Clement, J. K. ; The role of water in tremolite and certain other min- 
erals, Reference to 21, 166 

— , Allen, E. T., and Wright, Fred. Eugene; Minerals of the comjwsl- 

tlon MgSlO,, Reference to 21, 166 

— and Day, Arthur L., Reference to their work on high temperature. 21, 145 

Clement, F. E. ; The question of paleo-ecology 29, 154 

— ; Scope and significance of paleo-ecology 29, 369 

Clements, J. M., cited on ellipsoidal basalts 25, 614 

Ely greenstones 25, 615 

origin of pillow lavas 25, 638 

Clendenin, W. W., Geological work in Louisiana of 25, 173 

Cleveland meeting of the American Association for the Advancement 

of Science, August, 1888, The Geological Society of America pro- 
visionally organized at 21, 746 

— , Ohio, Local anticlines in the Chagrin shales at 21, 24, 771 

, Natural gas at 26, 102 

Cuff Lake, Montana, Origin of ; G. R. Mansfield 26, 764 

— sculpture of the Yosemlte Valley ; FrauQois E. Matthes 21, 20, 759 

CuMATE and its influence on Oligocene faunas of the Pacific coast ; R. E. 

Dlckerson 29, 166 

physical conditions of the Keewatiu ; A- P. Coleman 21, 25 

— of the Bahla limestone region 22, 195 

— , Paleontologlc evidences of 21, 73 



J 



*56 J. STANLEY-BROWN INDEX TO VOLUMES 21 TO 30 

CuMATES, ETolution of geologic 30. 499 

— , Geologic and present 30« 103 

— of the iNist, Presidential address by F. H. Knowlton 30, 151 

CuMATic changes. Effect on Glacial period 25, 556 

in Yucatan and Guatemala 25* 539 

, Possible explanations of 25, 544 

.Solar hypothesis of 25,4T-82 

— conditions. Mammalian fauna showing 21, 120 

— investigations on geological theories, Bearing on recent; Ellsworth 

Huntington 24, 70, 687 

— oscillations. Graphic projection of Pleistocene ; C. A. Reeds 26, 106 

in Permo-Carboniferous beds of Texas 25, 41 

— provinces of the United States west of the Rockies ; W. G. Reed 25, 124 

— pulsations 25, 532 

— relation of the Tertiary of the west coast ; J. P. Smith 28, 226 

— yardstick. Use of trees as a 25, 529 

— zones in the Pliocene of the Pacific coast : J. P. Smith 27. 172 

^.Shifting of 25,540-541 

Clinch Mountain, Virginia, Section of 24, 452 

CuNS, J. H., Analysis of allanite by 28, 489 

— and Watson, Thomas L. ; Hyi^rsthene syenite and related rocks of 

the Blue Ridge region, Virginia 2T, 193 

; Hypersthene ss>*enite (akeri^e) of the middle and northern Blue 

Ridge region, Virginia 2©, 82 

CuNTON County, New York, Iron-ore deposits of 30, 93 

— formation of Ontario, New Cystid from the 21. 76 

— formations in the Antit-ostl section ; E. O. Ulrich aS, 82 

— , Medina, and Cataract, Contacts between 25, 292 

— of New York, Upi^r limit of 29, 327, 353 

— oolitic iron ore 25, 768 

— sand, A source of oU in Ohio 22, 67, 736 

CIMhj^ridimQ orbicMlarU, Foosdl of Wasiitch region 2I, 530 

Clorim^la barrQndii 6rrf#, Anticosti Island 21, 705 

Close of the Cretaceous and opening of Eoivue time in North .Vmerica ; 

II. F. Osbom 25,321 

CLormxtss in regions having temiieniture anomalies. Chart of 25, 582 

Cu>VGH. 11. W., cited on suu-s|iot cycle 28, 825 

Clite, John : Statement ivm-eming salt beils of Seneca Lake 23, 481 

CoAL-BEARiNG, Eoi-enc of western Washington. I. IMen'e County ; W. J. 

J»»« 25, 121 

— formations of I'tah. Wyominj:, and New Mexico 25, 345 

— ixxiis of the Raton Mesa region of Colorado and New Mexii\) 24, 114 

— Creek batbt>luh. Gci^ltMrio age and sriH^K^^ry of the Colorado Front range 

26,398 

— de|Ht(;ats of Jaiian. China, and Manchuria 28, 130 

— field of Pienv County. Washington. Structure of 20, 132 

— fields of New Mexitw Certain structure features in the: C. T. Kirk. 2B, 405 
of ui^rthem ivuiral New Mexii\>. Siratigraph^v of 2$. 571-686 



COAIrBEAKING COLEMAN 57 

Page 
CoAii-BEABiNG formation, Mother of coal and its relation to tbe process 

of 24, 75. 715 

— , Inadequacy of the sapropelic hypothesis of the origin of 24, 73, 706 

— Measures of Maryland ; C. K. Swartz, W. A. Price, Jr., and H. Bassler 

30, 154, 567 

, Correlation of 30, 578 

, Scaled amphibia of the 26, 154 

— , Mode of deposition of 25, 58 

— , Petrified 28, 130 

— , Regional devolatilization of 21, 33, 788 

— resources of China ; N. F. Drake 24, 93 

— , Rhode Island , 21, 31, 783 

— , Roots in the underclays of 24, 76, 114, 719 

COAUMGA, California, Pliocene Jacalitos and Etchgoin formations at. . 27, 172 

Goalinga-Cantua district, California, Eocene of 24, 127 

CoAUNGA district. Fauna and relations of the white shales of the 26, 168 

— east side field, Relations of the Santa Margarita formation in the. . 26, 166 

— oil field, California, Unconformity at base of Tamiosoma zone 24, 132 

— quadrangle, California, Fauna of Tejon group in 27, 173 

Coast of Maine, Evidenc*e of recent subsidence on the 26, 91 

— Range batholith, British Columbia and Alaska subalkaline 21, 90 

— ranges of California, Glaciation in 25, 120 

San Luis Obisix) County, California, Geological section of 24,93 

Coastal marshes south of Cayte Cod ; Chas. A. Davis 23, 50, 743 

— plain, British East Africa 23, 299 

deposits. Extent of Atlantic 29, 583 

geology. Pioneers in 25, 157 

investigations conducted by the United States and State Geological 

Surveys ; T. Wayland Vaughan 23, 82 

— subsidence in New England 25, 61 

, Problem of 25, 59 

, Submarine chamsecyparls bog at Woods Hole, Massachusetts, and 

its relation to the problem of 24, 72, 699 

Cobb, Coujeb ; Two artesian well records from Hatteras Island 23, 51 

CocKEBfXL, T. D. A-, Flora of Florissant 26, 416 

CacuB d'Alene Lake, Origin and age of 23, 531 

CoHK, F., cited on algiu 21, 645 

formation of pisolite 25, 638 

"Sprudelsteln" of Carlsbad 27, 367 

Cole, G. A. J., cited on origin of plUow^ lavas 25, 638 

pillow structure 25, 599, 602 

silica replacement 25, 608 

Coleman, A. P., Bannock thrust, southeastern Idaho, discussed by 24,50 

— , Beginnings of Lake Agassiz discussed by 24, 71 

— cited on auorthosite 29, 409 

Canadian glacial movement 27, 252 

Carboniferous conglomerate of Alaska 25, 201 

clays 27, 111 



58 J. STANLEY-BROWN INDEX TO VOLUMES 21 TO 3O 

Page 

Coleman, A. P., cited on figures for Canadian points 27, 247 

geologic climates 30, 555 

Glacial and post-Glacial movement 27, 249 

bands 27, 113 

features near Toronto , 26, 206 

gravel bar at Hamilton, Ontario 27, 247 

great batholltbs of eastern Ontario 21, 113 

Iroquois uplift 27, 248 

Labrador coast 29, 226 

Lake Iroquois 21, 241 

map of Isobases 27, 253 

measurement of the Iroquois beach 21, 242 

occurrence of Interglacial beds in Canada 21, 435 

raised beaches 29, 203 

rate of wave erosion on the shores of Lake Ontario and glacial 

Lake Iroquois 26, 107 

u^ift of Iroquois plane .' 27, 235 

— ; Climate and physical conditions of the Keewatln 21, 25, 778 

— , Deformation of the Algonquin Beach discussed by 24, 71 

— , Discussion of age of Lake Ontario by 26, 36 

Colorado glaclation by 26,31-32 

deformation of Ontario region by 26, 66 

, — earth movement in Minnesota by 25, 35 

pillow lava by 26, 33 

Precambrian nomenclature by 29, 91 

— , Effect of high pressure on solid substances discussed by 24, 71 

— , Fossils of lower limestone of Steep Rock series discussed by. . . 23,46, 723 

— , '*IIiuge line" used by 21, 239 

— , lowan drift discussed by 21, 698 

— ; Ijength and character of the earliest Interglacial i)eri<xi 26, 71 ; 26, 243-254 

— ; Memorial of A. B. Willmott 27, 37 

— , Morning session, December 28, called to order l)y 27, 5 

— presided at afternoon meeting, December 28 27, 47 

afternoon meeting, December 30 27, 106 

morning session, De<*ember 29 27, 00 

morning meeting, December 30 27, 83 

— ; Presidential address : "Dry land in geology" 27, 175 

— , Pre- Wisconsin glacial drift in the region of (Jlacier Park, Montana, 

discussed by 23, 44, 730 

— , Reference to presidential address by 27, 82 

— , Remarks on conglomerate and breccia by 27, 93 

Pleistocene deformation by 28, 165 

rock foliation by 27, 58 

Collapsing geoid. Faceted form of a 29, 76 

Collet, L. W., cited on sea sediments 28. 739 

CoLLETT, John, on committee Cincinnati meeting, 1881 2I, 742 

Collie, George Lucius ; Physiography of the East African plateau 23, 49, 

297-316 



COLLIER — COM M ITTEE 59 

Page 
OoLLiER, A. J., citefl on Devonian limestone of Alaska 25t 1^3 

geologic time 28.883 

— , Fossil plants in Alaska collected by 24, 116 

— , Reference to "Geology and coal resources of the Cape Lisburne re- 
gion, Alaska," of 27, 704 

GoixiNS, W. H., cited on striated stones from Huronian region 27, 187 

CoujNOwooD section, Ontario 25, 318 

CoLLOiDAi. migration in ore deposits, ROle of ; J. D. Clark 26, 394 

Colombia, Geology of 29, 639 

CoijoB scheme for crystal models ; George H. Cbadwick 23, 51, 728 

Colorado and New Mexico, Coal-bearing rocks of the Raton Mesa region 

of 24, 114 

, Relation of Cretaceous formations to the Rocky Mountains 

in 26, 114, 156 

— , Continuity of marine sedimentation in 26, 345 

— desert. Some topographical features of 21, 793 

— , Early Tertiary glaciation in 25, 31 

— epoch, Coal-bearing formations of the 25, 345 

, Crustal oscillations during the 25, 344 

— , Fossil algje from Green River formation in 27, 159 

— Front Range, Explanatory description of 23, 94 

geolog}' and geologic age of the Coal Creek batholith 26, 398 

— group. Conglomerate of the 25, 346 

— , Limit of altitude of glaciated valleys in 21, 673 

— , Mammal-bearing beds of 25, 325 

— , Mesa Verde formation in 25, 345 

— , Occurrence of tlow-breccias In 26, 399 

— oil fields 28, 592 

— Plateau province, Older geologic structures of the 21, 555 

. Wind sculpture of roc»k In 26, 393 

— , Primary chalcocite in 26, 84 

— ^, Recent remarkable gold "strike" at the Cresson mine, Cripple Creek. 24,84 

— , Rockstreams of Veta Mountain 21, 26, 633-676, 764 

peak 21,663-676 

— , Section of Morrison in 29, 252 

— , Tillodont skull from 29, 147 

Columbia, Emerald deix>sits of Musko 27, 63 

— , Petroleum supply of 28, 612 

— River (Yakima) lava, Age of 23, 535 

CoMANCHiAN of Chamberlain and Salisbury, Reference to 26, 307 

CoMMEBCiAL coutrol of the mineral resources of the world ; J. E. Spurr 30^ 108 
C\>MMiTTEE of Publication, Rei>ort of 21, 17-19 

— on Correspondentshlp, Api)ointment of 21, 35 

formation of Pnleontological Society, Report of 21, 16 

Geologic Nomenclature, Iiei)ort of 21, 29 

Nomenclature of Faults 21, 29 ; 24» 163 

the Cranial Elements in the Permian Tetrapoda. 28, 973 

Photographs, Report of •. 21,19 



60 J. STANLEY-BROWN INDEX TO VOLUMES 21 TO 30 

CoHPAiusoN of American aud European Lower Ordovicic formations; 

Amadeus W. Grabau 27f 555 

European and American early Paleozoic formations; Amadeus W. 

Grabau 27, 159 

marine vertebrates of western North America with those of other 

Trlassic areas ; J. C. Merriam 26, 413 

the Cretaceous faunas of Japan with tliose of western United 

States ; H. Yake 26, 414 

floras of California with those of other Cretaceous areas; 

F. H. Knowlton 26, 414 

European and American Siluria; Amadeus W. Grabau 28,129 

oysters of the lower and upper horizons of the Miocene of the 

Muir syncline ; W. V. Cruess 25, 154 

Yellowstone Park algie with Algonkian forms; Charles D. Wal- 

cott 27, 156 

— with akerite of syenite 27, 206 

quartz monzonite of hypersthene syenite 27, 204 

Composite suhtilitat Fossil of Wasatch region 21. 530 

Composition of bornite aud its relation to other sulphominerals ; E. H. 

Kraus 25, 90 

C0M8TOCK, Theodora B., Bibliography of 27, 13 

— , Memorial of 27, 12 

— , Photograph of 27, 12 

Concentration sand type, Description of 21, 647-650 

Conception Bay, Manganese deposits of 25, 73 

CoNDiT, D. D., cited on Conemaugh formation 30, 582 

oil wells 28, 674 

— , Evidence in the Helena- Yellowstone Park region, Montana, of the 

great Jurassic erosion surface 28, 161 

Conditions of deposition of some Tertiary petroliferous sediments; 

A. W. Grabau 30, 103 

CoNEMAUOH formation of Maryland SO, 572 

Conoijomerate, Characteristics of a corrosion 25, 265 

— , Edgewise 24. 112 

— , Occurrence of intra form a tional 27, 93 

— of the Galena formation 25, 269 

Trenton series 25, 265 

— (red) of the San Jos^ and Mount Hamilton quadrangles, Thickness 

of 24, 96 

— , Shinarump 24, 52, 679 

Conglomerates, Causes produ(»lng scratched, impressed, fractured, and 

recemented pebbles in ancient ; J. M. CHarke , 26, 60 

— in deltas. Significance of 23, 440 

— of south Brazil, Permo-Carbonic 21, 30, 779 

the delta deposits of North America, Bald Eagle, Green Pond, and 

Shawangunk 24, 411 

Connate waters of the Atlantic coast ; Alfred C. Lane 21, 24, 774 

Connecticut and Hudson valleys, Submergence of the 25, 63 



CONNECTICUT — COPE 61 

Page 

Connecticut, Distribution of allanite in 28t 469 

— , Flooding of Connecticut Valley in 30, 618 

— , Glacial phenomena in 29ff 196 

— , Mastodon found in 25t 143 

— , Peat deposit near New Haven 24, 72, 700 

— , Pillow lavas of 25, 622 

— , Pyrrhotite, norite, and pyroxenite from Litchfield 26, 83 

— , Sand-plains of 30, 627 

— Valley, Altitudes in 29, 208 

, Devonian of the 26, 126 

, Flooding of 30, 615 

, Glacial meanders, oxbows, and lettles in 25, 232 

, Marine submergence of 25, 219 

CoNineLLY, W. A., quoted on the rock of the Pis-Pis district, Nicaragua 23, 497 
C^ONODONT bed at Eighteen-mile Creek, New York, Fish fauna of the. . . 26, 154 

Conrad, T. A., cited on California Eocene 29, 283 

Medina formation 25, 285, 286 

sandstone 25, 298 

— r- mud-cracks 29, 479 

— , Geological work in Florida of 25, 174 

Georgia of 25,174 

Louisiana of 25, 172 

of 25.161 

— , Medina fauna described by 25, 288 

CoNRAD*s tenn Niagara sandstone. Reference to 25, 286 

C\)N8TiTUTioN, Amendments to 21, 19 

— and by-laws 25, 93 ; 30, 131 

of Paleontological Society 21, 77-82 

Continental elastics : 28, 162, 917 

— deposits ; Magnitude of 24, 54, 677 

— (Mid-) eolation ; Charles R. Keyes 22, 687 

— glaciatlon. Evidence of 26, 78 

— glacier in central Illinois, Glacial erosion near margin of 26, 70 

— rocks. Reference by Daly to 27, 326 

Continents and oceans. Changed iiositions of 27, 190 

, Permanence of 24, 106 

Contribution to the origin of dolomite ; W. A. Tarr 30, 114 

CoN^xcTioN in igneous magmas 29, 101 

Cook, G. H., cited on Silurian formations in New York, New Jersey, and 

Pexmsylvania 27, 544, 545 

Cook, H. J. ; First recorded Amphibian from the Tertiary of Nebraska. 28, 213 

— introduced by W. D. Matthew 28, 213 

Coon butte and meteoric falls of the desert ; Charles R. Keyes 21, 24, 773 

— Rapids, Carroll County, Iowa, Pleistocene deposits in 29, 77 

Cooperation in advanced geologic instruction ; II. E. Gregory 30, 94 

Coosa Valley, Alabama, Rock decay in -. . 21, 570 

Cope, E. D., cited on description of the famous skull **Anaptomorphus*' 

homunculus 26, 430 



62 J.STANLEY-BROWN INDEX TO VOLUMES 21 TO 30 

Cope, E. D.. cited on Judith Kiver fauna 25. 3a3 

Paleocene 25, 399 

postoptic 28. 985 

— , Inadequacy of classification of dinosaurs by 25, 378 

— , Reference to reconstruction of camarosaurus by 25, 143 

— and Baur, Oeoboe, cited on hyi)o<*entra and pleurocentra 21, 265 

Cope's Sauropoda, Restoration of 30, 151 

Copper Mine Hill, Geological section through 25, 409 

— ores, Examples of progressive change in the mineral composition of ; 

C. F. Tolman, Jr 26, 394 

— River in Alaska, Canyon and delta of * 24, 71, 699 

Coral fauna, Onondaga 27, 478 

— island theory, Comprehensive ; G. C. Curtis 26, 78 

Coralline algte in an Ordovician dolomite; Eliot Blackwelder 24,116,607-624 

Coral-reef beds, Anticosti Island, First marked 21, 702 

, Definition and origin of 22, 238 

problem ; W. M. Davis 27, 46 

— , Virgin and northern Leeward Islands bearing on 27. 41 

tract of Florida compared with other coral-reef areas 25, 41 

— reefs and platforms. Various localities of 26, 59 

reef corals of the southeastern United States, their geologic his- 
tory and significance ; T. W. Vaughan 26, 58 

, Cambrian, Ordovician, Silurian, Devonian, and Carboniferous 22, 244-248 

, Character of the bottom of Paleozoic 22. 250 

recent 22, 242 

, Composition of recent 22, 239 

the oceanic salts in Paleozoic 22, 250 

of recent 22, 242 

, Depth of water and intensity of light of Paleozoic 22, 247 

recent 22,239 

, Gotland and Wisconsin Silurian Pa/eozoic 22, 247 

, Grabau quoted on New York and Wisc»onsin Paleozoic 22, 247 

, Motion of the water about recent 22, 242 

, Movement of oceanic waters around Paleozoic 22, 250 

of Florida 26, 59 

the Philippines 28, 540 

.Physical condition under which were formed, Paleozoic; T. Way- 
land Vaughan 22, 93. 238 

" ," Relation to Paleozoic limestone formation of 27, 147 

» Specific gravitj' of the oceanic waters of Paleozoic ^ 22, 251 

water of recent. Table of 22, 243 

, Subsidence of 28, 151 

, Summary of conditions under which were formed Paleozoic and 

Recent 22, 251 

, Temperature of Paleozoic 22, 250 

Corals, American diphyphylloids 28. 208 

Middle and Upper Devonic 27, 147 

— as constructional geologic agents, Summarized statement of 26,59 



CORALS CORRELATION 63 

Page 

Odbai>s discussed by A. VV. Graban 28* 208 

— y Evolution of the Anthozoa and tbe systematic position of Paleozoic 26* 157 
— , Floridian and Babainan shoal-water 27, 154 

— from the Cretaceous and Tertiary of California and Oregon ; J. O. 

Nomland 27, 174 

Cordillera of Canada, Stratigraphy of 29, 145 

— , Stratigraphy of Canadian 27, 158 

CoRDiLLERAN glaciatiou, Possible intermediate stage of 24, 566 

— Section, Annual dinner held in conjunction with the Le Conte Club 

and the Paleontological Society ^ 24, 97 

of Le Conte Club, Paleontological Society, and 23, 71 

, Election of officers 21,790; 23,70; 24,92 

, Meeting held in conjunction with the Pacific Association of Scien- 
tific Societies 24,91 

of 21, 789-796 

, Paper on crystal classes read before 21, 731 

geologic work of ants in tropical America, read by J. C. 

Branner before the 21, 450-496, 790 

, Postponement of convention of 21, 34 

, Proceedings of Annual Meeting of 21, 789 ; 23, 69 ; 

24, 91 ; 25, 119 ; 26, 129 

, Register of Berkeley meeting of 21, 796 

Seattle meeting of 26, 140 

Stanford University meeting of 24, 98 

, Representation on the Council of the 24, 92 

, Resolutions concerning nominations and tenure of office 24, 92 

, Unanimous vote to petition general society for a representative 

on the Council by 21, 794 

, Visitors and other geologists taking part in the meeting of 24, 98; 

26, 140 

— Society, Discussion and vote on representation on the Council 23, 70 

Cores, Specific weight of drill 27, 49 

CoRKiLi^ E. T., cited on Ontario oil fields 28, 723 

CoBNEiJUS, E., Coastal Plain geolog>' by 26, 160 

— , Geological work In Georgia by 25, 173 

CoRNiFEBOus rocks as a source of petroleum 28, 673 

Cornish, Vaughan, cited on marine sediments 28, 739 

rippling and dune formations 21, 642 

— , Reference to paper on "Progressive waves in rivers'* of 21, 619 

sea-beaches and sand-banks of 21, 601 

— , Theory of formation of beach cusps 21, 616 

Cornwall X. C. ; Occurrence of mammal remains In the asphalt beds of 

McKittrick, California 26, 167 

Correlation and chronologj' in geology on the basis of paleogeography ; 

Charles Schuchert 26, 411 ; 27, 491 

paleogeography ; II. F. Osbom 23, 85, 232 

phylogeny, Certain theoretical considerations affecting 24, 118, 283 



64 J.STANLEY-BROWN INDEX TO VOLUMES 21 TO 30 

Page 
Correlation and reconstruetioii of recessional Ice borders in Berkshire 

County, Massachusetts ; F. B. Tayloe 27. 273 

— t)etween invertebrate fauuas of California and those of Mexico; E. K 

Packard 26, 414 

the Cretaceous of the Pacific area and that of other regions of the 

world ; T. W. Stanton 26* 414 

middle and late Tertiary of the South Atlantic coast of the 

United States with that of the Pacific coast ; E. H. Sellards 26, 414 

Miocene of the Pacific region and that of other areas of the 

world. Topic of Calif orsia Meeting of the Paleontological Society, 
August 6, 1915 26, 415 

terrestrial Triassic forms of western North America and Eu- 
rope; R. S. Lull 26,413 

— by displacements of the strand-line and the function and proi)er use 

of fossils in correlation ; E. O. I'lrich 27. 451 

— of Maryland Coal Measures 30, 578 

Maysrille beds of Wisconsin with Alexandrian rocks of Illinois. . 27. 310 

Miocene, Introductory remarks on ; H. F. Osborn 26> 415 

roi^ks in the isolated coal fields around the southern end of the 

Rocky Mountains in New Mexico; Willis Thomas Lee... 23.26,571-686 

Silurian of Fludson Bay region 30. 367 

the Cretaceous invertebrate faunas of California ; T. W. Stanton 26, 414 

, Topic for the California Meeting of the Paleontological So- 
ciety, August 5, 1915 26, 414 

Guadalupian and Kansas sections ; J. W. Beede 21, 76 

Lower Miocene of California ; Ralph Arnold 26« 415 

Middle Ordovician formations of Ontario and Quebec; P. E. Ray- 
mond 24, 111 

Miocene fioras of western United States with those of other 

Miocene areas ; F. H. Knowlton 26, 416 

oil strata in United States \ 28, 629. 631 

Pleistocene of EuroiJe and America : H. F. Osborn 21. 75 

in western Washington : C. L. Weaver 26, 170 

Tertiary formations of the Pacific coast and liasin re;cions of 

western United States ; J. C. Merriam 25, 156 

Triassic, Symposium for California Meeting of the Paleonto- 
logical Society, August 4, 1915 26, 415 

Upi^er Cretaceous deposits of the Atlantic and Gulf Coastal 

Plain ; I^ W. Stephenson 27, 154 

In Montana and AU>erta ; Bamum Brown 28, 216 

typical late Cretai^'eous and early Tertiary formation 25, 393 

— problems suggeste<l by study of the faunas of the East|)ort Quad- 

rangle. Maine: H. S. Williams 24. 52, 377-.^7 

— , Use of fossil plants in geologic 27, 52.5 

CowuKSPONDEXTsuip, Committee apiwinted on 23, 35 

CoBBOsiox conglomerate. Characteristics of a 25, 39 

CoBRT sandstone. Marine fauna in 26, 210 

CoBBTOBPHiXE, G. S., clted on Carboniferous ci>nglomerate of Africa.. 26.201 



CORUNDUM — CRETACEOUS 65 

I'age 

CoBUNDUM, Occurrence of ruby 21, 793 

Ck>8M0B Club, Presidential address and entertainment by the Geological 

Society of Washington at the 23, 49 

Costa Rica, Geology of 29, 620 

CosTE, E., cited on Ontario oil fields 28, 723 

CbTTA, B., cited on nietamorphlsin 28, 383 

CoTTiNG, J. R., Geological work in Georgia of 25, 173 

CoTTON-cuLTUBE reports of the Tenth Census 26, 176 

Cottonwood canyon (Big), Utah, Diagram showing the relations of the 

Cambrian and Alonkian quartzites in 21, 522 

OoTYLEDONABY uode of Cycadcoldea ; G. R. Wieland 22, 91 

CouLTEB, J. M., cited on plant development 30, 548 

Council Bluffs, Iowa, and Omaha, Nebraska, Pleistocene of the vicinity 

of 22. 65, 730 

Council, Report of 21, 35 ; 22, 56 ; 23, 38 ; 24. 2 ; 

25, 51 ; 26, 5 ; 27, 5 ; 28, 5 ; 29. 4 ; 30. 4 

ordered printed 21, 34 

Paleontological Society 23, 77 ; 24, 101 ; 26, 130; 

26, 144 ; 27, 142 ; 28, 192; 29, 123 ; 30, 144 

Coupeb, J. H., Geological work In Georgia of 26, 174 

OovEY Hill beaches 26, 237 

Gulf, Location, origin, and features of 23, 471-474 

, Iroquois plane in the region of 24, 224 

revisited ; J. W. Spencer 23, 36, 471-475. 721 

CowuTz River Valley, Eocene of 27, 174 

— Valley, Washington, Eocene of the 26, 136, 169 

Cox, A. H., cited on pillow lava 26, 601, 603 

CoxE, EcKi£Y B., Method of separating coal from slate devised by. . . . 21, 775 

Craig, J. I., cited on climatic changes 26, 541 

Crandall, a. R., quoted on dikes of Elliott County, Kentucky 26, 482 

— and Williams, Report of, Concerning Catinga limestone 22, 202 

Crandall, Roderic, Cited on ants of South America 21, 452, 475, 479 

— , Photographs of ant-hills by 21, 449, 466, 467, 468, 481, 483 

Cranial elements in the Permian Tetrapoda, Nomenclature of the. . . . 28, 973 

Cratcr, Kilauea, a drop-fault 26, 77 

Crawford, J., Geological zones in Nicaragua established by 23, 495 

Crawford, R. D., cited on flow-breccia 26, 400 

Credner, G. R., cited on origin of pillow lavas 26, 637 

pillow structure 26, 596-597 

— , Reference to work of 28, 738 

Cre3>ner, H., cited on "Age of Mammals" 27, 177 

his "Geologie" 27, 176 

monoclines 27, 91 

CREMACRiNiDiC, Nomenclature, structure, and classification of the 24, 109 

Cresson mine, Cripple Creek, Colorado, Recent remarkable gold "strike" 

at 26, 84 

Cretaceo-Eocene age, Wasatch range overthrusts of 21, 539, 542 

Cretaceous age of the Potomac group indicated 26, 336 

V — Bull. Geol. Soc. Am. 



66 J. STANLEY-BROWN INDEX TO VOLUMES 21 TO 30 

Page 

Cbktaceous and early Tertiary fonnntion, Correlations of late 25, 3^3 

Eocene time in North America, Reference to 26, 295 

Tertiary, .California 25, 152 

correlated with the European succession 25, 394 

floras of Alaska, Preliminary correlation of the; Arthur Hollick 

24, 116 
formations of western North Dakota and eastern Montana ; A. G. 

Leonard . . . : 22. 63. 722 

horissons in the Marysville buttes ; U. E. Dickinson 28, 233 

in North America, Boundary between 25, 341 

periods, Division between 25, 398 

stratigraphy of the western end of the Santa Inez Mountains, 

Santa Barbara County, ('alifornia ; H. J. Htiwley 29, 164 

— , Assignment of Lance formation to 25, 35.3 

— climate 25, 375 

— deposits of Atlantic and Gulf Coastal Plain 27, 154 

— Dinosaurs ; R. S. Lull 23, 85, 208 

— Echinoderms of California, Note on the ; W. S. W. Kew 26, 166 

— Eocene contact in North America 25, 342 

the Atlantic and Gulf Coastal Plain; L. W. Stephenson 26, 168 

correlation in New -Mexico, Wyoming, Montana, Alberta; B. Brown 

25,355 

I)erlod in the Rocky Mountain front and Great Plains provinces. 

Physiographic study of 26, 105 

— faunas of Japan comiwred with those of western United States; 

H. Yabe 26, 414 

the Santa Ana Mountains ; E. L. Packard 26, 169 

— floras 30, 520 

of California compared with those of other Cretaceous areas ; F. H. 

Knowlton 26, 414 

— formation. The Morrison, an initial 26, 90, 151, 303-314 

— formations of central and western New Mexico and southwestern 

Colorado, Tal»le of age relations of 23, 593 

, Relation of, to the Rocky Mountains of (^olorado and New Mexico ; 

W. T. Lee 26, 114, 156 

— In the Interior province. End of the 25, 347 

— Invertebrate- faunas of California, Correlation of; T. W. Stanton... 26,414 

— Invertebrates from southern Colorado and northern New Mexi(x>, 

Table of distribution of 23, 599-602 

— of Alberta, Canada ; Joseph IL Sinclair 27, 85, 673 

, Character of strata of 27, 674 

Brazil 30, 221 

California and Oregon, Corals from the 27, 174 

e<iuatorlal America, Upper 29, 632 

Mexico 29, 605 

Montana, Volcanic activity In the 25, 346 

Nebraska, New Pleslosaurlan genus from the Niobrara 24,120 

North and South America 29, 611 



X 



CRETACEOUS — CROSBY 67 

Vage 
Cretaceous of the Pacific area ; correlation between it and that of other 

r^ons of the world ; T. W. Stanton 26, 414 

Santa Ana Mountains, Fauna of 27, 174 

— oil and sandstones 28, 678 

— or Chico time 27, 513 

— overlaps in northwest Europe and their bearing on the bathynietric 

distribution of the Cretaceous Silicispongite ; Marjorie O'Connell 29, 142 

— , Physiographic features of 27, 674 

— , Recent work on the dinosaurs of the 26, 416 

— rocks near Durango, Colorado, Measurements of 23, 584-589 

— sedimentation of the interior province 25, 343 

— Selma chalk 26,332 

— stratigraphy, Santa Inez peneplains, Santa Barbara (^ounty, Califor- 

nia 29, 164 

, Upper 26, 149 

— , Symposium on the passage from the Jurassic to the 26, 151 

— terranes, Tamasopa oil-bearing limestone of the Mexican 24, 255 

— Tertiary boundary in the Rocky Mountain region ; F. H. Knowlton . 25, 325 
problem, Evidence of the Pa leocene- vertebrate fauna on the 25,381 

— time in North America, Close of Jurassic and opening of ; H. F. Os- 

born 26, 295-302 

the 25,321 

CiUDEB, A. F., Geological work in Mississippi and Ix)uisiana of 25, 171 

Cbinoid arms, Use in studies of phylogeny of 25, 135 

— from Ontario, A new Trenton 23, 84 

— genus Scyphocrinva and its bulbous root Camarocrinu^ ; Frank 

Springer 24, 110 

Crifple C?reek, Colorado, Recent remarkable gold "strike" at the Cresson 

mine 26, 84 

Criteria for the determination of siiecies in the Saur()i)o<ls, with descrip- 
tion of a new si)ecies of Apatosauria ; Charles C. Mook 27, 151 

Criteria of attitude in bedded dei)osits ; Lancaster D. Burling 28, 208 

correlation from the point of view of the invertebrate paleontolo- 
gist ; E. O. Ulrich 26, 410 

Critical study of fossil leaves from the Dakota sandstone ; E. M. Gress 

29, 131 
Criticism of the Hayfordian conception of isostasy regarde<l from the 

standpoint of geology ; W. H. Ilobbs 25, 34 

Crocker, William, cited on plant development 30, 548 

Cromrie, Flora, Acknowledgments to 29, 330 

Crook, A. R. ; Additional note on Monks Mound 29, 80 

— , Discussion of loess by 29, 73 

— ; Origin of Monks Mound 26, 74 

Crooks, , cited on war geology 30, 171 

Chocks, H. F. ; Precambrian rocks in the Medicine Bow Mountains of 

Wyoming 29, 97 

— ; Types of North American Paleozoic oolites 29, 102 

Crosry, W. O., Acknowledgments to 28, 543 



68 J. STANLEY-BROWN INDEX TO VOLUMES 21 TO 30 

Vage 
Cbosby, W. O. ; Buried gorge of the Hudson River and geologic relations 

of Hudson syphon of the Catsklll aqueduct 26, 89 

— ; Certain aspects of glaciation in Alaska 30, 115 

— cited on beach cusps 21, 604 

Blackstone series 25, 443 

Long Island geology 28, 305 

nielaphyre tjows of Nantucket 25, 621 

origin of pillow lavas 25, 638 

sand-plains 30, 621 

— ; Physiographic relations of serpentine, with special reference to the 

serpentine stock of Slaten Island, New York 25, 87 

Gboss, Whitman, cited on alkaline rocks of Hawaii 27, 330 

allanite 28, 465 

^ andesites of the Hawaiian Islands 27, 327 

climate formation 30, 496 

derivation of alkaline rocks 27, 329 

forms of Igneous rocks of the San Juan Mountains of Colorado 26, 399 

Hawaiian Islands 28, 271 

lava flows of Hawaiian volcanoes 27, 328 

magmatlc assimilation 25, 261 

monzonite 27, 206 

Morrison formation 30, 381 

the Laramie 25, 338 

unconformity In the Denver basin 25, 329 

— , Climatic investigations on geological theories discussed by 24, 70 

— , Discussion of glaciation in Colorado by 25, 32 

gold "strike" at Cresson mine, Cripple Creek, Colorado, by 26,85 

Red Beds by 25,81 

on origin of the alkaline rocks by 21, 32 

some mineral relations from the laboratory viewi>oint by 21,32 

— elected Councilor •. 24, 9 

— ; Geology in the world war and after. Presidential address by 30, 165 

— ; Lavas of Hawaii and their relations 24, 54, 684 

— f Objects and methotls of petrographlc description discussed by 24, 76 

— quoted on flow-breccia 26, 400 

the production of lithophyjw .• 26, 256 

— , Remarks on effects of pressure on rocks and minerals by 26, 84 

— , Vote of thanks offered by 21, 34 

— and Howe, Ernest ; Landslides in the San Juan Mountains, Reference 

to 23. 492 

quoteil on "rock glaciers*' and **ro(»k streams'* 21, 663 

, **Rock stream** as a geologic term first used by 21, 663 

Lassen, E. S., quoted on connection of Morrison and Gunnison 

l>eds 26, 311 

Cbossopteryoians 27, 406 

Crucible for the aci'urate determination of melting iK>int of minerals. 

Figure 4. showing 21, 159 



CRUESS CURTIS 69 

Page 
Cbuess, W. V. ; Comparison of the oysters of the lower and upper hori- 
zons of the Miocene of the Muir syncline 26> 154 

Cbustal movements in the Lake Erie region, Preliminary paper on re- 
cent ; Charles E. Decker 26, 66 

Cbystal classes, Tables for the determination of 21, 731-736 

— faces, Validity of the law of rational indices of ; Austin F. Rogers. . . 24, 93 

— growth. Forces affecting 28, 154 

Cbystalliive graphite deposits of Alabama ; W. F. Prouty 30, 112 

— marbles of Alabama ; Wm. F. Prouty 26, 104 ; 27, 63, 437 

, Location map of 27, 437 

— rocks in the tropics. Fluting of 24, 94 

Cbystaluzation, Molecular composition at the moment of 21, 168 

— of certain pyroxene-bearing artificial melts ; N. L. Bowen 25, 91 

Cbystalijoqbaphy, Ditticultles in 21, 731 

— , Key to 21. 731 

Cbybtals and crystal forces ; F. E. Wright 27, 62 

— (mix-) and solid solutions, Description of 21, 152 

Cuba, Discovery of Oxfordian in SO, 152 

— , Geology of 29, 618 

Cuban fossil mammals ; W. D. Matthew 24, 109, 118 

Cubbebly, E. p., cited on Trenton limestone 28, 672 

OuLMEB, H. L. A., Diagrams showing origin of the Caroline and the Ed- 
win natural bridges, furnished by 21, 318, 319 

— , Photographs of the Edwin and Augusta sandstone natural bridges 

from paintings of , 21, 317 

— quoted on courses of streams in San Juan County, Utah 21, 317 

CuLTEB, H. C, Paper of F. M. Handy on rdle of sedimentation in diastro- 

phism and vulcanlsm read by 26, 138 

CuMBEBLAND-DiAMOND IllU district in Rhode Island-Massachusetts. 26,75,435 

— Hill, Geological section through 25, 471 

— quartzites 26, 440-442 

CuMBEBiJkNDiTE of Diamond Hill-Cumberland district 26, 450 

CuMiNGB, E. R., cited on fresh-water sediments 28, 909 

Richmondian fossils 21, 699 

— ; Development of the Monticullporoids 23, 84, 357-367 

— , Medina of Ontario discussed by 28, 83 

— , Memorial of Charles 8. Prosser by 28, 70 

— , Secretary of Second Section 24, 51 

— and GALiiOWAY, J. J. ; Studies of the morphology' and histology of the 

Trepostomata or Monticulii)oroids 26, 158, 349-374 

HussAKOF, L. ; Paleontologic evidences of recapitulation 21, 74 

CuBiE, Madame, cited on value of heating effect of radium 26, 195 

CuBiE, Maubice, cited on atomic weight of lead 28, 849 

^»Tms, G. C. ; Age as the determinant of character in volcanoes 26, 78 

— ; Comprehensive coral island theorj' 26, 78 

— ; Evidence of continental glaciation on Mount Katahdin 26, 78 

— introduced by E. O. Hovey 26, 77, 78, 79 



70 J. STANLEY-BROWN INDEX TO VOLUMES 21 TO 30 

Ci-BTis, G. C, ; Kilauea, A drop-fault crater 26, 77 

— ; Naturalistic land model, the **last word in geology"* 26, 79 

CusHiNG, H. P., Acknowledgments to 25, 244, 251 

— , Au^te syenite described by 27, 215 

— , Basic syenite described by 27, 215 

— ; Bleaching of granite and limestone contacts 21, 33, 786 

— chairman Third Section 26, 81 

— cited on Adirondack rocks 25,247.254,263 

akerite analyses 27, 207 

from New York 27,209 

anorthosite 29, 400 

metamorphisni 28* 402 

moraines in the Adirondacks 27, 650 

syenite and granite of Adirondacks 27, 213 

. — undulation of Paleozoic rocks for the Watertown district 26, 287 

— ; Diastrophic imiwrtance of the unconformity at the Imse of the Berea 

sandstone in Ohio 26, 96. 155, 205-216 

— . Discussion of anorthosites by 28, 155 

Hamilton group of western New York by 26, 113 

North Amerii'an continent in I'pper Devonic time by 26, 90 

the revision of pre-Camlirian classification in Ontario by 26, 88 

on origin of the alkaline rocks by 21, 32 

— elected Ubrarian 21,3; 22,152; 23,2; 24,9 

— : Ideology of Ixing I^ke quadrangle. Reference to 22, 152 

— : Manuscript on Ogdensburg quadrangle of 26, 288 

— :The Northumberland (New York) Volcanic Plug 241,53,335^49 

— : I^roposed modifications in the nomenclature of the early Paleoioic 

rocks of New York 22, 62 

— quoted on underground water of Black River, New York 21, 332 

— and I'LRicH, E. O, (extem|x>re Pn>fessor Oushing) ; Age of the "cal- 

cifenms" formation of the Mohawk Valley 21, 30, 780 

cited on refinement of stnttigraphic unit» in Canton quadrangle 26, 288 

CrsHMAX. J. A., cited on cliemi^'nl and organic deposits 28, 933 

iVsps, Beach 21,26-27 

Ci-TTfJU U F^ Reference to tx>ntour map of 28, 543 

mTTixcsviixK, Vermont, The i\>mplex of alkaline ignei>us roi4kS at. 21,32,785 

Crvii:*, Gix>w5i:s. cited on catastrophism 27, 515 

time value of extinct orgsmisms 27, 492 

l'YCADix»iDKA, The i>>tyledonary niMe of 22, 91 

— , Floral features of 24, 115 

C"Ycu>xic vtffH* i*aloric form of s^>lar hyiH»thesls 25, 521 

Cyi u>sTx>MK bryoE*ui, tlassifimition principles of 29, 151 

t^ xiHn>NTs, The Alispheiwids of 2^ 244 

i"Y5»nD i new i frwn tlie Clinton formation of Ontario; W. A. Parks 21, 76 

1^ STS and brown NHiit^ of Trei^^toinata 26. 351 

OsTiphragms of tin* Tre|H^tomaia 26, 350 



DAOOBTT ^DALY 71 



D 

Page 
Daggett, F. S., and Mebbiam, J. C, Excursion of California Meeting, 

August 13, 1915, in charge of 26, 417 

Dakota sandstone 26, 311 

, Fossil leaves from 20, 131 

, New Mexico and Colorado 23, 593 

Dakotas, Mammal-bearing beds of 25, 325 

Dalabne, Ix)wer Ordovicic of 27, 604 

Dale, N. C, Analyses of Milford granite by. 25, 459 

Dale, R. B., cited on analysis of stream waters of the United States. . 29, 597 

Dale, T. N., cited on allanite 28, 468 

Dall, W. H., cited on Alaska and its resources 21, 398, 399 

Florida's land relations southward 29, 666 

marine moUusks 27, 499 

occurrence of interglacial beds in Canada 21, 435 

Upi)er Oligocene of Florida 25, 175 

— , Invertebrate fossils of Burkeville localit>% Texas, submitted to. . . . 26, 469 
— ; The nature of Tertiary and modem marine faunal barriers and cur- 
rents 22, 93, 218 

— quoted on age of Catinga limestone 22, 205 

— , Reference to biographical sketch of T. A. Conrad by 25, 162 

papers on Brachiopoda, 1870-1909, of 22, 258 

Southern geological work of 25, 163 

— ; State of our knowledge of the middle American Tertiary 23, 82 

— and Lull, Richard S. ; Embryology and paleontology 21, 74 

Dalmeb, K., cited on pillow structure 25, 597 

Dalv, Mabcel, cited on origin of oil 28, 731 

Daly, R. A., Donald C. Barton introduced by 27, 115 

— , Bibliography by 27, 341 

— cited on anorthosite 29, 414 

belt terirane of British Columbia 25,189 

Cambrian faunas of the Rocky Mountains 21, 523 

gneissoid granite 28, 459, 461 

Hawaiian Islands 28,504 

ice erosion 21, 727 

Kilauea 28, 272, 276. 277 

Labrador coast 29, 213, 226 

magmatic assimilation 25, 261 

metamorphism 28, 404 

monzonite analyses 27, 206 

oil-fleld strudure 28, 641 

origin of pillow lava 25, 637-638 

structure 25, 636 

peneplains 29, 581 

raised beaches 29, 203 

Saint John uplift 29, 207 

theory of glacial control 27, 46 



72 J.STANLEY-BROWN INDEX TO VOLUMES 21 TO 30 

Page 

Daly, R. A., cited on volcanoes 28, 270 

— , Discussion of Appalachian peneplains by 28, 128 

physiographic control in the Philippines by 26, 396 

on geologic thermometry by 21, 32 

volcanic action by 21, 23 

— ; Field relations of litchfieldite and soda-syenites of Litchfield, Maine 

29, 99, 463 

— , "Gas fluxing" hypotheses of 28, 250 

— ; Hawaiian volcanoes 21, 22, 767 

— ; Homocline and monocline 27, 89 

— , Introduction of W. G. Foye by 28, 166 

— , Leaves of Hawaii and their relations discussed by 24, 54 

— ; Metamorphism and its phases 28, 126, 575 

— ; New test of the subsidence theory of coral reefs 28, 151 

— , Observations at the Kilauea Crater discussed by 24, 74, 707 

— ; Origin of the iron ores at Kiruna, Sweden 26, 99 

--, Petrography of the Pacific islands 27, 48, 325 

— , Sidney Powers introduced by 26, 93, 94 

— ; Pre-Cambrian formations in south-central British Columbia . . . 23, 36, 721 
— , Reference to "Geology of the North American Cordillera at the forty- 
ninth parallel" of 27, 715 

"Igneous rocks and their origin" by 27, 330 

use of term Phoenix by 20, 351 

writings on origin of certain minerals 21, 111 

— , Remarks on Black Hills granite by 27, 106 

coral-reef problem by 27, 46 

rock foliation by 27, 58 

Daly, R. W., cited on term homocline 28, 569 

Dana, E. S., cited on allanlte 28, 469 

Dana, J. D., Centenary meeting in honor of 24, 55 

— cited on Basin Range structures 21, 550 

chrysolite 27, 286 

classification of Ordovicic rocks 27, 560 

Connecticut Valley terraces 26, 221 

groups of crj'stals 21, 732 

Hawaiian Islands 28, 501 

his "Manual" 27, 176 

hypothesis of a continuous Paleozoic sea 27, 492 

island phenomena 29, 494 

metamorphism 28, 382 

monoclines 27, 91 

oolitic sands 26, 747-748 

origin of pillow lavas 26, 640, 642 

permanence of continents and oceans 27, 190 

submergence of Connecticut Valley 26, 64 

the making of the Sierra Nevada Mountains 27, 507 

Palisade Mountains 27, 507 

theory of permanence of ocean basins and continents 27, 493 



DAKA — ^DARWIN 73 

Pag* 
Dana, J. D., cited on volcanoes 28, 272 

— , "Niagara period" defined by . ^ 2J1, 680 

— , Reference to class names of crystals used by 21, 732 

"Manual" by 27, 557 

— , University Lfibrary display in honor of the one hundredth anniversary 

of birth of. .x 24,55 

Danian beds 25,6^ 

— deposits 25. 342 

— stai;e, Reference to 26, 321 

Daitiels, Joseph ; Structure of Pierce County coal fields of Washington 26, 132 

Dabton, N. H., cited on Amsden formation 29, 309 

Hudson estuary 28,282,291,306 

Morrison formation 29, 251 

natural bridges of Le Perle Creek, Wyoming, and Buffalo gap, 

South Dakota 21, 320 

New Jersey trap sheet 25, 623 

oil in igneous rocks 28, 593 

Red Beds 27,120 

Silurian formation, New Jersey 27, 543 

Zuni salt deposits 21, 648 

— ; Extension of Morrison formation into New Mexico 26, 113 

— ; Geology of part of Luna County, New Mexico, by 22, 55, 718 

— ; Geology of the Bighorn Mountains of Wyoming, Reference to 24, 607 

— , Geothermal data of the United States 24, 51, 677 

— , "Green Pond conglomerate" and "Long^vood shales" names given by 24, 477 
— ; A list of underground temperatures in the United States 22, 54, 716 ; 23, 50 

— ; Lower Paleozoic rocks of the southern New Mexico region 28, 172 

— , Photograph of natural bridge in Big Bad Lands, South Dakota. . . . 21,325 
— , Piedmont terraces and post-Jurassic history of the northern Ap- 
palachians discussed by 24, 70, 694 

— quoted on formation of Bighorn dolomite 24, 614 

Red Beds of Wyoming 26, 218 

rock of natural bridge in Big Bad Lands, South Dakota 21, 326 

— , Report of Committee on Photographs by 21, 19 ; 22, 52 ; 

23, 35 ; 24. 48 ; 25, 49 ; 26, 57 ; 29, 69 

— ; Sedimentary succession in southern New Mexico 27, 86 

— , Shinarunip conglomerate discussed by ; 24, 52, 679 

— ; Some features in the Grand Canyon of the Colorado River. . . . 23,36, 721 

structural features in the northern anthracite coal field 24,51,676 

— ; Stratigraphy of Red Beds of New Mexico 25, 81 

— ; Structure of some mountains in New Mexico 29, 72 

Dabwin, Charles, cited on coral reefs 29, 490 

earthworms 21, 493 

Galapagos Islands 28, 501 

geologic time estimates 28, 749, 810, 901 

theory of subsidence. 27, 46 

— , Reference to his "Corals and coral islands" 21, 646 

"Origin of species" by 27, 492 



74 J. STANLEY-BROWN INDEX TO VOLUMES 21 TO 30 

Page 
Dabwin, Chables, Reference to subsidence theory of coral atoll forma- 
tion 26, 78 

work of 28, 738 

Dabwin, Geoboe II., cited on geologic climates 30, 554 

— and HoBACE, cited on first attempts to measure tiodily tides in the 

earth 26, 172 

Dabwin, IIoback, and Geobge II., cited on first attempts to measure 

bodily tides in the earth 26, 172 

"Das Antlitz der Erde," Work of Eduard Suess 21, 28 

Date of local glaciation in the White, Adirondack, and Catskill Moun- 
tains; D. W. Johnson 28,136,543 

Dathe, E., cited on pillow structure 25, 596 

Dating of peneplains; an old erosion surface in Idaho, Montana, and 

Washington— is it Eocene? ; J. L. Rich 29. 89 

Daubeny, Ciiables, cited on spheroidal structure 25, 634 

Daubb£e, G. a., cited on experimental geology 29, 175 

experiments with sand grains 21, 635 

metamorphism 28, 379 

— ; Ex|)erimental geology, Reference to 22, 140, 167 

— , Reference to mai>s Illustrating control of waterways by jcflnts of.. 22,159 

work of 28, 738 

Daubb£e*s water- vapor experiment. Observations of John Johnston and 

L. H. Adams on 24, 605 

David, T. W. E., cited on atolls 29, 565 

geologic climates 30, 557 

war geology 30, 170 

Davidson, Thomas ; A monograph of recent Brachioi)oda, Reference to 22, 258 
Davis, C. A., Bibliography of 27, 38 

— cited on origin of oil 28, 729 

organic deposits 28, 740 

— , Discussion of algal and bacterial deiwsits in the Algonkian Moun- 
tains of Montana by 26, 148 

glacial erosion by 26, 73 

oolites by 25, 58 

— ; Evidence of recent subsidence on the coast of Maine 26, 91 

— , Glacial deposits of the continental type in Alaska discussed by. 23,44,730 

— , Memorial of 28, 14 

— ; Peat deposit of geological interest at New Haven, Connecticut. 24,72,700 
— ; Physiographic evidence of re<*ent subsidence on the coast of Maine. 27, 108 

— ; Salt-marsh formation near Boston and Its geological signllicance 

21, 29, 766 

— ; Some coastal marshes south of Cai>e Ood 23, 50, 742 

fossil alg» from the oil-yielding shales of the Green River forma- 
tion of Colorado and Utah 27, 159 

historical evidence of coastal subsidence In New England 25, 61 

— , Stability of the Atlantic coast discussed by 23, 49, 740 

DA\^s, Charles II. ; Discussion of the Jurassic age of the slates at Slate 

Springs, Monterey County, California 24, 131 



DAVIS ^DAVIS 75 

Page 
Davis, E. P., and Law son, A. C, Excursion of California Meeting, Au- 
gust 6, 1915, in charge of ^ 26, 407 

Davis, W. J., on committee Cincinnati Meeting, 1881 21, 742 

Davis, W. M. ; Annual address of retiring President 23, 49, 93-124 

— cited on Cenozoic beds as dry-land d^)osits 27, 179 

deltas 29, 194 

derivation of sand from shells or lime-secreting plants 21, 644 

Hudson estuary 28, 282, 290, 306 

Lake Bonneville 28, 352, 358 

land degradation in an arid climate 22, 567 

marl 21, 644 

peneplanation 28, 756 

Pennsylvania peneplains 29, 576 

physiography of the Wasatch region 21, 519, 541 

pillow lavas 25,623 

sand-plains 30, 609 

sedimentaries 28, 737 

Somerville i)eneplaiu 28, 345 

uniformitarianism 28, 775 

— ; Coral-reef problem 27, 46 

— ; Differential erosion and equiplanation discussed by 23, 49 

— , Discussion of Nebraskan and Kansan drifts by 23f 47 

on condition of the Keewatin by 21, 25 

Niagara River and the Glacial period' by 21, 26, 763 

origin of Cliff Lake, Montana, by 21, 26, 764 

post-Tertiary history of the lakes of Asia Minor and Syria by. . 

21,20,755 

rock streams of Veta Mountain by 21, 26 

some effects of glacier action in Iceland by 21, 20, 759 

types of sand grains by 21, 25, 776 

volcanic action by 21,23,768 

— ; Geographical description in the folios of the Geologic Atlas of the 

United States 22, 66, 736 

— , Glacial deposits east of Cody, Wyoming, discussed by 23, 45, 731 

of the continental tyi>e in Alaska discussed by 23, 44, 730 

— , Moraines of Ontario and western New York discussed by 23, 46 

— ; Nomenclature of surface forms on faulted structures 24, 187-215 

— , Observations at the Kilauea Crater discussed by 24, 74, 707 

— on Committee on the Nomenclature of Faults 24, 163 

— , Piedmont terraces and post- Jurassic history of the northern Appa- 
lachians discussed by 24,70,692 

— , Post-Glacial earth movements discussed by 24, 74 

— quoted on formation of arid plains 21, 582, 586, 587 

— , Reference to war work of 30. 176 

— ; Relation of geography to geology: annual address of President. 23,93-124 

— ^ Report on Nomenclature of Faults discussed by 24, 49 

— ; Speculative nature of geology 24, 70, 687 

— ; Sublacustrine glacial erosion In Montana 25, 86 



76 J. STANLEY-BROWN INDEX TO VOLUMES 21 TO 3O 

Pave 

Davis, W. M. ; Subsidence of reef -encircling Islands 29, 71, 489 

— ; Theory of isostacy - 21. 25, 777 

Dawson, G. M., cited on Braebum limestone 25, 198 

metamorpbism •. 28, 401 

section of the Missouri 27, 85 

term "Laramie" 26, 359 

Willow Creek series 25,361 

— quoted on agency of floating ice 24, 545 

drift of the Keewatin ice-sheet 24, 554, 555, 556, 561 

name "Albertan" proposed by 24, 5W 

— , Reference to preliminary report on the physical and geological fea- 
tures of the southern portion of the interior of British Ck)lumbia 

by 27, 705, 715 

"Report on a geological examination of the northern part of 

Vancouver Island and adjacent coasts" of 27, 709, 714 

the area of the Kamloops map sheet, British Columbia, by 

27, 705, 716 

"Queen Charlotte Islands" of 27,708,711,713 

reports on southwestern Alberta 24, 549 

— and McCoNNELL, R. G. ; "Glacial deposits of southwestern Alberta in 

the vicinity of the Rocky Mountains," Reference to 23, 707 

Dawson, J. W., cited on amphibian foot-prints 27, 410 

two species of Ginkgo 26, 339 

— , Reference to "Report on the fossil plants of the Lower Carbonifer- 
ous and Millstone Grit formations of Canada" by 27, 410 

Dawson arkose 23. 271 

— beds 25.325 

,Flora of the 25,332 

— formation. Correlation of the 25, 334 

Day, a. L., cited on Etna 28, 251 

origin of pillow lavas 25, 643, 645 

Stromboli 28. 270, 278 

— , Effect of high pressure on solid substances presented by 24. 50, 674 

— elected Fellow 21. 3 

— , Experimental geology discussed by 24. 49 

— , (Geophysical Laboratory of the Carnegie Institute visited by invita- 
tion of Director 23, 46 

— , J. C. Hostetter introduced by 27, 60 

— , John Johnston introduced by 26. 83 

— ; Preliminary report of certain physical and physicochemlcal observa- 
tions at the Kilauea Crater 24, 74, 573-603, 707 

— , Reference to work of 29, 186 

— ; Some further consideration of the forces developed in crystal growth 

28,154 

mineral relations from the lalwratory .viewpoint 21, 32, 141-178 

observations of the volcano Kilauea in action 25, 80 

— ; Study of recent activity of Mauna Loa 28, 127 




DAY — DEFORMATION 77 

Page 
I>AY, A. L., and Allen, E. T. ; Isomorpblsm and thermal properties of 

feldspars, Reference to 21, 165, 166 

Shephebd, E. S., cited on studies at Kilauea 26t 375 

; The lime-silica series of minerals, Reference to 21, 166 

; Water and volcanic activity 24.573-606 

— , SoRMAN, RoBEBT B., and Gi£MENT, J. K., Reference to their work on 

high temperature 21, 145 

— and Washington, H. S. ; Present condition of the volcanoes of south- 

em Italy , 26, 105, 375-388 

DAT, D. T., cited on oil fields 28, 645 

in igneous rocks 28, 592 

origin of oil 28, 732 

— ; Productivity of oil shale 28, 157 

Dead lake of the Ghipola River, Florida ; E. H. Sellards 27, 109 

Dean, Bashfobd, elected Third Vice-President 24, 104 

— ; Memorial of G. R. Eastman 30, 27 

— ; Paleozoic fishes 23, 86, 224 

— , Reference to "Notes on the living specimens of the Australian lung- 
fish, Ceratodua foraateri in the Zoological Society's collection" of 

27,407 
Dean, George A., and Headlee, T. J. ; The mound-huildlng prairie ant, 

Reference to ^ 21, 451 

Decker, G. E. ; Hemicones at the mouths of hanging valleys 26, 76 

— Introduced by Richard R. Hlce 26, 66, 76 

— ; Preliminary paper on recent crustal movements In the Lake Erie 

region 26, 66 

— , Remarks on gumbo by 27> 119 

Deep boring from near McDonald, Pennsylvania, Note on a very; I. G. 

White 24, 73. 275-280 

— drilling effect on oil development 28, 652 

— well near McDonald, Pennsylvania, Additional data and record of. . 26, 280 

^ Record of depth and discussion of section 24, 277, 278 

Deepest boring in West Virginia ; I. G. White 26, 48 

Deeps, Frontal oceanic 21, 200, 201 

" — " in the channel of the lower Susquehanna River ; Edward B. Ma- 
thews 28, 151 

Deer from Argentina, Fossil 27, 153 

Definition and determination of the mineral hydroxides of iron ; H. E. 

Merwin and Eugen Posnjak 27, 61 

Deflation and aeroposition. Relations of areas of 22, 702 

— and the relative efficiencies of erosional processes and conditions of 

aridity ; Gharles R. Keyes 21, 565-598 

— in dry regions, Authorities cited on 22, 696 

— , landscape features of the Gontlnental Divide due to 23, 717 

Deflative scheme of the geographic cycle in an arid climate; Charles 

R. Keyes 23, 49, 537-562 

6eformation of limestone 28, 163 

discussed by Arthur Keith 28, 163 



78 J. STANLEY-BROWN INDEX TO VOLUMES 21 TO 30 

Page 

Deformation of the Algonquin Beaeli, Remarkable 24, 71, 697 

coast region of British Columbia ; C. H. Clapp 26. 406 

Ontario region .* 25, 65 

unconsolidated beds in Nova Scotia and southern Ontario; E. M. 

Kindle 28, 163, 323 

De Geer, Gerabd, cited on glacial clays of Sweden 2T, HI 

Pleistocene changes 28, 290 

of level in eastern North America 21. 245 

maps 27,253 

— quoted on lakes Dakota and Agassiz 21, 239 

Quaternary changes of level in Scandinavia 21, 245, 246 

— , Reference to paper on Pleistocene changes of 21, 227 

"Quaternary changes of level in Scandinavia" 21, 228 

De Golyeb, G., cited on classification of petroleum fields 28, 558 

igneous intrusions in oil fields 28, 586, 589 

De Kalb, Ck)UBTENAY, quoted on the Pis-Pis district, Nicaragua 23, 497 

De La Beche, H. T., cited on oolitic texture 25, 746-747 

Delaware terraces ; N. H. Winchell 25, 86 

Delesse, a., cited on pillow lava 25. 634 

— , Reference to work of 28, 738 

Delkeskamp, Rudolf, On sources of thermal waters 22. 120 

Delta and canyon of the Copper River in Alaska ; Lawrence Martin 24, 71, 699 

— cycle and its use 23, 395 

, Criteria for the recognition of ancient 23, 48, 378-445, 743 

— deposits (ancient) ; A. W. Grabau 23, 48, 743 

from Ordovicic and Siluric of Appalachian Mountain region, Ex- 
amples of ancient 24, 406 

of North America, Conclusions, as to origin of Sha wangunk and 

Longwood 24, 526 

, Early Paleozoic 24, 400-528 

, Niagaran marine interval 24, 470 

, Sandstones and conglomerates 24, 406 

, Structure of marginal, fossils of, overlap relations of, and coarse- 
ness of 24, 404-406 

— fans of North America, The Mid-Silurian 24, 472 

— (Mississippian) in the northern New River district of Virginia; E. B. 

Branson 23, 48, 447^56, 743 

Deltas, Absence of fossils in 23, 415 

— , Definitions, comiwnent parts, origin, etcetera, of 23, 378-445 

— , Glacial 25, 226, 241 

— , Summit 29, 191 

Denckmann, a., cited on pillow structure 25, 598 

Denison, Napier, Seismograph records of Alaskan earthquake given out 

by 21, 374 

Density of the earth 26, 173 

Dentition, Evolution of human 27, l'J9 

Denudation, Rhythms in 28, 753 



DENVER — DEVONIAN 79 

Page 
r>EKV]:3 and Arapahoe formations, Relutiou of the Dawson arkose to 

the 23, 274 

— beds 25, 325 

— flora 25, 331-333 

— formation, Correlation of the 25, 334 

Deposits. Characteristics of glacier junction 21, 722 

— (glacial) in the region of Glacier National Park, Montana 23, 691 

— of the sea 28, 163 

Derby, O. A. ; Age of Catinga limestone of Bahla ,.,\ 22* 198 

— , Bibliography of 27, 21 

— cited on glaciation in Brazil 25, 31 

rock decajj in Brazil 21, 570 

— ; Limestone of the Silurian age at Bom Jesus de I^pa, Reference to. 22, 188 

— , Memorial of 27, 15 

— , Photograph of 27, 15 

— , Remarks by John M. Clarke on 27, 146 

Desert, Epigene profiles of the 26, 391 

— occupation of the earth, Extent of 22, 688 

— ranges development. Stages of, Figure showing 21, 560, 561 

, False fault-scarps of 26, 65 

, Relations of present profiles and geologic structures in ; Charles R. 

Keyes 21, 543-563 

, Time of major faulting of region of 21, 560 

flexing of region of 21, 560 

— , The red sands of the Arabian 21, 643 

— regions. Normal water action in 23, 560 

— regolith and its genetic relations to maximum eplrotic deposition; 

Charles Keyes • 27, 57 

— sand-blast, Limited effective vertical range of the; W. H. Hobbs... 26,396 

— strucrtures, Walther, Spurr, McGee, Passarge, Davis, Penck, Keyes, 

and Cross suggest new explanation of 21, 568 

— waters. Erosive potential of 25, 88 

Deserts, Character of sand of 21, 639 

Desiiayes, G. p., cited on extinct molluscan fauna of Paris basin 25, 321 

Des Moines section. Pleistocene formation of the 23, 710 

Desmospondylus anovtalua. Genus and si)eci€»s new 21, 280-283 

Desor, E., cited on Danien stage 25, 321 

New England submergence 30, 598 

Richmond boulder trains 21, 747 

Detroit River series. Relative age of 27, 72 

DErssEN, Aijcxander, introduced by J. A. Taff 26, 398 

— ; Pisolites at San Antonio, Texas 26, 398 

— , Remarks on the Texas Tertiary sands by 26, 398 

I)E\'ELOPMENT of three successive peneplains in Kansas ; J. W. Beede. . 28, 160 

Devils Lake, or Ijike Minnewanka, Location of 24, 233 

Devonian and black shale succession of western Tennessee ; C O. Dun- 
bar 28, 207 

— faunas. Shifting and migration of 21, 76. 285-294 



80 J. STANLEY-BROWN INDEX TO VOLUMES 21 TO 30 

Page 

Devonian fishes of Missouri ; E. B. Branson 24. 119 

— floras 30* o07 

— formations In Missouri 27, 160 

— fossils of Hudson and James Bay region 30, 373-374 

— igneous roclcs ; 25, 452-461 

— map of British Isles 27, 347 

— of Brazil 30, 207 

— of central Missouri ; E. B. Branson and D. K. Greger 26, 112, 156 

; Fauna of the Cooper limestone ; D. K. Greger 28, 209 

upper Connecticut Valley ; C. H. Hitchcock 26, 126 

— period, Geography of British Isles in 27, 382 

— roclcs in Hudson and James Bay region 30, 370 

— Silurian climates, Influence on vertebrates of .' 27, 40 

— species of Hexactinellid dictyosponges, Development of 25, 138 

Devonic black shale of Michigan, Ohio, Canada, and western New York 

interpreted as a Paleozoic delta deposit ; A. W. Grabau 25, 137 

— corals, Distribution and Inferred migration of 27, 147 

, Notes on 23, 87 

— flsh faunas, Most remarkable known 26, 154 

— stratigraphy, Signlflcance of Sherburne sandstone in 30, 423 

, Upper 20, 127 

Devono-Cambbian limestones and dolomites of Alaska 25, 190 

— Ordovlclan shale of Alaska 25, 195 

De Vbies, Mutations of Waagen and of 24, 120 

— , Relation in evolution of mutants of 27, 148 

Dewet, H., cited on origin of pillow lava and structure 25, 636, 638 

pillow lava 25,604,606-607 

De Wolf, F. W., elected Fellow 21, 3 

— , Mexico gulf coast petroleum fields discussed by 24, 73, 706 

— , Reference to war work of 30, 176 

Dew-points, Table of observations of 24, 580 

Diabase, Apparent sun-crack structure in ; Edgar T. Wherry 22, 55, 718 

— - dikes in Diamond Hill district 25, 474 

— , Experimental investigation into the flow of ; F. D. Adams 21, 24 

— , General character of the 27, 632 

Diagnostic characteristics of marine elastics; E. M. Kindle. . 28, 162, 207,906 
DiAMOND-BEABiNG perldotlte area, Arkansas 23, 37, 726 

— Hill-Cumberland district, Glaciatlon in 25, 438 

in Rhode Island-Massachusetts 25, 435 

, Petrography of 25, 449 

, Table of rock formations of 25, 439 

felslte 25, 461 

quartz deposits 25, 471 

DiASTBOPHic importance of the unconformity at the base of the Berea 

sandstone in Ohio ; H. P. Gushing 26, 96, 155, 205-216 

— method, Advantages of 27, 470 

DiASTBOPHisM and migrations of fauna 25, 397 

vulcanlsm, Rdle of sedimentation in 26, 138 



DIASTROPHISM — DIKES 81 

Page 
D1A8TROPHI8M, Epeirogenic movement, New York State 24, 159 

— of the Pacific coast, Topic C, Summer Meeting in California, 1915.. 26*390 

Dice, L. R. ; Rodents of Rancho La Brea 26, 167 

— ; Systematic position of several American Tertiary lagomorphs 27, 169 

Diccratherium cooki Peterson, A mounted skeleton in tbe Carnegie Mu- 

seum of ; O. A. Peterson 22, 95 

Dick, Wm. J., and Abams, Frank D. ; Extension of the Montana phos- 
phate deposits northward into Canada 27, 62 

DicKEBSON, R. E. ; Ancient Panama straits 28, 230 

— cited on California Eocene 29, 283-284 

Cretaceous-Eocene boundary ( 25, 343 

fauna of Tejon Eocene of California 29, 294 

Oligocene climatic conditions 29, 306 

Tejon group 29, 290 

— ; Climate and its influence on Oligocene faunas of the Pacific coast. . 29, 166 
— ; Cretaceous and Tertiary horizons in the Marysville buttes 28, 233 

— elected Secretary and Treasurer Pacific Coast Section of the Paleon- 

tological Society 24, 126 

— ; Eocene of San Pedro Point, San Mateo County, California 24, 126 

— ; Fauna of the Siphonalia sutterensia zone in the Roseburg quad- 
rangle, Oregon 26, 169 

Tejon group in the Cantua district of the Coallnga quad- 
rangle, California 27, 173 

in San Diego County 27, 173 

— ; Faunal geography of the Eocene of California 26, 416 

relations of the San Lorenzo Oligocene to the Eot»ene in California 25, 153 

zones of the Martinez Eocene of California . * 25, 154 

— ; lone formation of the Sierra Nevada foothills, a local fades of the 

Upper Tejon-Eocene 26, 168 

— ; MoUusca of the Carrlzo Creek beds and their Caribbean affinities. 29,148 
— ; Occurrence of the Siphonalia snttereiisis zone, the uppermost Tejon 

horizon In the outer Coast Ranges of California 29, 163 

— presided at meeting of Pacific Coast Section of Paleontological So- 

ciety, February 27, 1915 27, 168 

— ; Proposed correlation of the Pacific and Atlantic Eocene 29, 148 

— , Remarks on Cowlitz River Valley by 27, 174 

— ; Stratigraphic and faunal relations of the Martinez and Tejon south 

of Mount Diablo, California 24, 127 

— ; Tertiary moUusks and echinoderms from the vicinity of Texpan, 

Mexico 28, 224 

D1CRCESAUBU8 Janensch, Description of 26, 329 

DicTYONEMAS of New Bruuswick, Notes on the 23, 83 

Dietrich, W. O., cited on gastroiwda of the Tendaguru series 29, 278 

Tendaguru series 29, 264 

Diffusion in silicate melts ; N. L. Bowen 27, 48 

DiGHTON group of Narragansett series 25, 447 

Dikes in central western Virginia, Petrology of a series of igneous 

24, 302, 334 

VI — Bull. Oeol. 80c. Am. 



82 J. STAXLEY-BROWN INDEX TO VOLUMES 21 TO 30 

Page 
DiLLER, J. S., Address as retiring Vice-rresideut of Section E of the 

American Association for tlie Advancement of Science 26. HI 

— cited on deep-sea deposits 21, 644 

lee slopes of dunes of tlie Oregon coast 21. 642 

loess from Muscatine, Iowa 21, 639 

^ oolites 25, 761. 762, 764 

production of volcanic sand 21. 629 

— .Communication relating to Powell National Park presented by 23,44 

— ; Memoir of Clarence Edward Dutton 24, 10 

— ; Recent eruptions of Lassen l*eak, California 26, 105 

— ; Relief of our Pacific coast 26, HI 

— and IIoLWAY, R. S. : Characteristics of the Lassen Peak eruptions of 

. May 20-22, 191.5 26, 397 

Dinner of the California Meeting of the Paleontological Society at the 

Engineers* Club, in San Francisco, August 4, 191.'> 26, 413 

Geological, Paleontological, and Seismological Societies, Summer 

Meeting, 101."i, at Engineers' Club 26. 395 

Society, Annual 21.27; 22.64; 23,46; 24,74; 

25, 80 ; 26, 104 ; 2T, 60 ; 28, 136 ; 29, 98 ; 30, 116 

Dinobolus beds, Anticosti island 21, 696 

Dinorthis porcata beds, Anticosti Island 21, 701 

Dinosaur-bearing beds 25, 325 

— faunas' relationship to the unconformity sejiaratlng Cretaceous and 

Tertiary 26, 3.37 

— from the Triassic of the Connecticut Valley, A new; Mlgnon Talbot. 22,94 

— quarry in Uintah County, Utah, The Carnegie; W. J. Holland 22,94 

— , Skeleton In Berlin Museum of 26, 153 

of largest known 26, 153 

DiNOSAURiAN societies, Three vistas of 26, 327 

Dinosaurs as evidence of Cretaceous age 25, 337 

— , Cretaceous and pre-Cretaceous 23, 85, 204, 208 

— in Tertiary formations 25, 400 

— , Migratory roads of Sauropod and Stegosaur 26, 326 

— , Occurrence and absence of 25, .337 

— of the Cretaceous, Recent work on ; H. F. Osborn 26, 416 

— , Perdentate 26, 329 

— , Reference to absence and occurrence of 25, 334 

— , Sauropod and Stegosaur 26, 324 

— , Structure of the Sauroptxi 21. 74 

— , Undetermined classification of formations containing 26, 342 

DiNWiDDiE, J. G., analyses by 27. 202-2a3, 230, 232 

DioRiTE by metamorphisni, production of apparent; Arthur Keith. . 24,54,684 

— of Vancouver Island, Wark , 26, 82 

DiPLODocus, Osteology of 29, 1.30 

— , Skeleton in Carnegie Museum of 27, 153 

DiPNOANS, Living 27, 406 

Dire wolves of the American Pleistocene 29, 161 



DISCOVERY DONNELLY 83 

Page 
Discovery of fluorite In the Ordovician limestone of Wisconsin; R. M. 

Bagg 29, 104 

# 

the Oxfordian in western Cuba ; B. Brown and M. 0*Connell 30. lf>2 

Diseases of the mosasaurs ; R. L. Moodie 29. 147 

Dispersal center, Effec^t of remoteness from 24, 287 

— of human race, Theory of centers of 24, 283 

Dis8orophul(Bf Family new 21, 277 

fiissorophus multicinctus, Part of skeleton found 21, 277 

Distribution and inferred migration 'of American Middle and rj)i>er 

Devonic corals ; Amadeus W. Grabau 27, 147 

District of Columbia, Igneous and metamorphic rocks of 28, 155 

DiTTMAR, W. ; Mean table of seventy-seven analyses of ocean water. . . 22,242 
Divergent ice-flow on the plnteau northeast of the Catskill Mountains 

as revealed by ice-molded topography ; J. L». Rich 25, 68 

Diversion of the Montreal River ; Robert Bell 21, 21, 762 

Diversions and correlations of the Dunkard series of Ohio ; Clinton R. 

StauflPer 27, 86 

Dixon, Dr. Samuel G., visiting geologists and paleontologists welcomed 

to the Academy by 26, 5 

DoELTER, C, cited on exi)erimental geology 29, 175 

Dole, R. B-, Chemical analyses by 28, 934 

— cited on rate of denudation 28, 821 

— , Precipitation of calcium carbonate and formation of oolites, Refer- 
ence to 26, 58 

DoUiO, Louis, cited on dipnoans 27, 408 

the Danien and Montien 26, 336 

the Montian 25, 396 

of Belgium 25,394 

— , Reference to *'Sur la Phylogenie des Dipneustes" by 27, 409 

Dolomite, Conilline algje in an Ordovician • 24, 115. 607 

— , Contribution to origin of 30, 114 

— , Mendota '. 27, 477 

— of Missouri, Glauconite in 29, 104 

— or limestone a flux for basalt 21, 109 

— , Origin of 25, 66 ; 28, 153, 431 

— , Relation of calcitfe to 27, 447 

— , Why Bighorn is a 24, 618 

Dolomites, Are the fossils of, indicative of shallow, highly saline, and 

warm seas? ; Stuart Weller 22, 93, 227 

— , Association with alkaline rocks of 21, 91 

— , New points on origin of ; F. M. Van Tuyl 26, 62 

— of western Wyoming, Bighorn and Jefferson 24, 115, 607 

Dominantly fluviatile origin, under seasonal rainfall, of the Old Red 

Sandstone ; Joseph Barrell ' i 27, 39, 345 

Don River beds, Character of fossils found in 25, 210 

glacial deposits 25, 200 

Donnelly iron ore 29, 351 



84 J. STANLEY-BROWN INDEX TO VOLUMES 21 TO 30 

Page 

DoBSE, G. B. ; Stratigraphy and structure of the Newark system in Mary- 
land and Its relation to the Newark system of eastern North 

America 30, 155 

Douglass, A. E., cited on relation of precipitation to tree growth 25, 529 

sun-spot cycle 28, 825 

tree measurements 25, 495 

Douglass, Earl, cited on Fort Tnion fauna 25, 389 

— ; Geologj- of the Uinta formation 25, 144, 417 

DouviLLfe, A., Reference to Handbook by 27, 574 

DowLiNo, D. B., cited on Canada oil fields 28, 726 

Hudson Bay limestone 30, 355 

modifications needed for Cairnes maps 27, 676 

the Bearpaw as a marine^ deinisit » 27, 682, 684 

DowNTONiAN formations. Stratigraphy of 27, 364 

Drainage changes in North Dakota, Pleistocene 27, 295 

— features of Little Missouri tributaries, Abnormal 27, 301 

— in New York State, Glacial waters 24, 147, 148 

northern Dakota, Pleistocene 27, 80 

— lines in desert regions, Development of original 23, 555 

— networks 22, 133 

— of central western New York, Pre-Glacial 21, 31 

— of Seneca Valley, Reversals of 23, 480 

Drake, E. L., cited on oil 28, 622 

Drake, N. F. ; Coal resources of China 24, 93 

— ; Dust storms in China 24, 92 

Dresser, J. A., cited on anorthosite 29, 429 

— , Discussion of anorthosites by 28, 155 

on the complex of alkaline igneous rocks 21, 32, 785 

Drew, G. H., cited on dentrifying of bacteria 28, 936 

organic deposits 28, 740 

origin of oolites 25, 762 

— , Precipitation of calcium carbonate and formation of oolites. Refer- 
ence to 26, 58 

Drift, Dawson "Albertan" and pre- Wisconsin, Moutann, glacial.. 24,530,542 
— , Extent of upper and lower Keewatin ice-sheet 24, 554 

— in Birds Hill section, Evidence of euglacial and superplacial . . . 21,429-431 

Iowa, Kansan , 27, 115 

the region of Glacier Park, Montana, Pre-Wisconsin glacial 24,71, 

529-572 
— , lowan 22, 65, 729 ; 24, 71, 698 

— of the mountain glaciers, Relations to Keewatin ice-sheet in Alberta 24, 555 

Driftless area. Physiographic studies in the 26, 76 

Drifts, Grooved and striated contact plane between the Nebraskan and 

Kansan 23, 47, 735 

Drilling deep for oil, Influence of 28, 652 

Drumltn formation. Radiation in glacial flow as factor in 22, 66, 733 

Drumlins of New York State, Subglacial 24, 143 

Drummond, Henry, quoted on white ants in tropical Africa 21, 485, 489 



DRY BAKLE 85 

Page 

Dby land in geology ; Presidential address by A. P. Ck)leman 27» 175 

Dbygalski, E. von ; Greenland expedition, Reference to 22, 133, 135 

Dbysdale, C. W., Bibliography of 29, 34 

— , Memorial of 29, 20 

— and Burling, L. D. ; Rocky Mountain section in the vicinity of White- 

mans Pass ' 29, 145 

DuMBLE, E. T., Acknowledgments to 25, 77 

— cited on California Martinez ..., 29, 293 

Mexican petroleum 28, 585 

Middle Miocene mammal fauna 27, 524 

— ; Problem of the Texas Tertiary sands 26, 398, 447 

— , Reference to geological work of 25, 166 

DcMONT, A. H., cited on Ma?strlclitien stage 25, 321 

DuNBAB, Carl O. ; Devonian and black shale succession of western Ten- 
nessee 28, 207 

DuNDAS section, Ontario 25, 315 

DuNKABD series of Ohio 27, 86 

Dunn, , cited on increasing oil production 28, 676 

Dunn, E. J., cited on australltes 27, 52 

DuNNiNGTON, F. P., Analyses of allanlte by 28, 490 

— cited on allanlte 28, 477 

DuBNESS limestone, Table of Ordoviclc species from 27, 566 

DuBOCHER, J., cited on metamorphism 28, 377 

DuBST, D. M. ; Physiographic features of the Haywards rift 25, 123 

Dus^N, P., cited on flora of Fagus zone 29, 644 

Tertiary floras of Straits of Magellan 29, 633 

Dust storms in China ; X. F. Drake 24, 92 

Dusts from desert tracts, Disposition of 22, 697 

DuTc^ East Indies, Petroleum su[^ly of 28, 615 

DuTTON, C. E., cited on Colorado trench 28, 360, 363 

Hawaiian Islands 28, 503 

monoclines 27, 90, 91, 92 

Pahoehoe lava 25, 639, 641 

— , Reference to report on Charleston earthquake of 1886 of 21,396 

DuTTON, E. C, Bibliography of 24, 17 

— , Memoir of ; J. S. Diller 24, 10 

DwiGHT, W. B., cited on wind excavation in the Cai>e Cod district. ... 21, 581 
Dyab, W. W. ; Edwin natural bridge: Century Magazine, August, 1904. 21,319 

E 

Eagle sandstone 25, 346 

Eakin, H. M., Differential erosion and eciuipla nation discussed by 23,49 

— , Glacial deposits of the continental type in Alaska discus.sed by 23, 44 

Eaku:, a. S., cited on allanite * 28, 471 

— , Discussion of Nevada stibnite by 25, 120 

nomenclature by 25, 125 

— V Indices of crystal faces discussed by 24, 93 



86 J. STANLEY-BROWN INDEX TO VOLUMES 21 TO 30 

Page 
Eakle, a. S. ; Mineral associations at Tonopah, Nevada 23> TO 

— ; Neocolemanlte, a variety of colemanite and howlite from Lang, Los 

Angeles County, California 23, 70 

— presided at meeting 25, 123 

— ; Some contact metamorphic minerals In crystalline limestone at 

Crestmore, near Riverside, California 25, 125 

— , Subject of Cordilleran Section being represented in the Council of 

the General Society presented by 21, 794 

— and Burgess, J. A.; Occurrence of the Halogen salts of silver at 

Tonopah, Nevada 21, 791 

Ix)x;debback, George D., appointed tellers at election of officers, 

Cordilleran Section 24, 92 

Early Paleozoic physiography of the southern Adirondacks; Wm. J. 

MiUer 24. 72, 701 

— Pliocene monodactylous horse ; Edward L. Troxell 27, 151 

— Tertiary glaciation in the San Juan region of Colorado; W. W. At- 

wood 25, 31 

Earseman, W. a., cited on oil 28, 626 

Earth, Density of the 26, 173 

— flow, The GroH Ventre slide, an active 23, 487-491 

— movements from the Lake region to the Saint Lawrence Valley, Ex- 

tended determination of post-Glacial 24,74,217-227,714 

in the Minnesota portion of the Lake Agassiz basin during and 

since the lake occupancy ; F. Leverett 25, 34 

recorded In the beaches, Triangulatlon of 24, 221 

Earthquake, Alaskan, of 1899 21, 23, 339-406 

— , California, 1906, Reference to 21, 342 

— diagram. Time intervals shown by 21, 375 

— earth-waves. Length of 21, 394 

— , The great Japan, 1891 22, 173 

— sea waves; H. F. Reid 25,33 

— tremors. Speed of transmission of 21, 391-394 

— waves, The propagation of; Harry Fielding Reid (read by title) 22,54 

Earthquakes, Areas affected by larger tectonic 21, 404 

— in Panama and their causes 25, 34 

— , Location by seismograph of 21, 376 

— , liosses of life and property by 21, 405, 406 

— of North America, Five great, P^gure 1, showing areas shaken 21, 342 

— , Synthetic study of recorded shocks of California 21, 7^1 

Earth's plan, Relation of Tertiai-y movements to 21, 220, 221 

— radiation 26, 195 

— rotation, Geotei'tonic adaptation through retardation of 30, 87 

East African Tendaguru formation. Age of 29, 245 

— Indies, Petroleum supply of 28, 615 

, Pillow lavas of 25, 610 

Eastman, C. R. ; Brain structures of fossil fishes from the Caney shales 

24, 119 

— ; Camiwdus and Edestus remains 28, 214 



EASTMAN EDMONTON 87 

Page 

Kabtman, C. R., cited on Devonic fishes 27, 402 

ostraecKlerms 27, 393 

— elected Editor Paleontologlcal Society 21, 72 ; 24, 104 

representative on Supervisory Board of American Year Book. . . . 26, 134 

— , Fish fauna discussed by 23, 87 

— ; Jurassic Saurian remains Ingested within fish 23, 87 

— , Memorial of 30, 27 

— ; Mesozolc and Cenozolc fishes 23, 86, 228 

— , Reference to "Devonic fishes of the New York formation" of 27, 402 

— , Specimen genus Rdestus discussed by 23, 87 

— and RuEDEMANN, Rudolph ; Anatomy and physiology In extinct or- 

ganisms 21, 74 

Kastport quadrangle faunas, Facts concerning 24, 377 

, Maine, Correlation problems suggested by study of the faunas of 

the 24, 52, 377 

, Faunal characteristics of the sediments of the 23, 352 

, Structural subdivision of the rocks of the 23, 351 

East River Mountain section, Virginia 24, 455 

Eaton, Amos, cited on Medina formation •. 25, 287, 297 

Eaton, G. F., Cuban fossil mammals discussed by '. . 24, 109 

KcHixNODERMs of California, Note on the Cretaceous 26, 166 

the San Pablo ; \V. S. W. Kew 25, 152 

Bk:HiNoiDS, Pacific coast, Geologic range and evolution of 29, 164 

Eckel, E. C, Geological work of 25, 171 

Economic geology of bedded dei)osit8. Graphic presentation of 27, 122 

Brazil 30, 223 

— limits to domestic independence in idinerals ; G. O. Smith 30, 98 

— , Mlneralogic, and Petrologic Section, l*apers relating to 21, 32-34 

— value of paleontology ; R. Arnold 30, 153 

EcuADOtt, Fossil fiora of 29, 640 

— , Petroleum supply of 28, 612 

Edentate deposits of North America 29, 161 

Edentates, Aftonian mammalian fauna 22, 215 

Edgewood formation and Girardeau limestone. Fauna of 21, 76 

Ediposite, Tlrconiferous 27, 223 

Editor, Election of J. Stanley-Brown as 21, 3 ; 22, 3 ; 23, 2 ; 24, 9 ; 

25, 9 ; 26, 11 ; 27, 11 ; 28, 12 ; 29, 11 ; 30, 11 

— , Report of 21, 39 ; 22, 60; 23, 42 ; 24, 7 ; 

25,56; 26,10; 27.9; 28,10; 29,9; 30,9 

Edmonson County, Kentucky, Underground caverns of 21, 331 

Edmonton formation 25, 362-368 

, Description and fossils of the 25, 373-376 

, Fossils of 25, 365-367 

Intermediate between Judith River and Lance 25, 380 

of Alberta Cretaceous 27, 683 

— formations of Canada 25, 337 

— Pierre contact 25, 368 

, Fossils from 25, 368 



88 J. STANLEY-BROWN INDEX TO VOLUMES 21 TO 30 

Page 
Edmonton Pierre contact, Geologic section of 26, 369 

— section, Fossil plants of the 25» 337 

Edmunds fauna. General correlation of and comparison of Rochester 

faunas with 24, 380. 381 

in the Silurian section of England, Brachiopods of the : 24, 382 

Edwards, Ira, Acknowledgments to 29f 330 

— cited on Clinton ore bed 29, 343 

Edwards, W. S., Acknowledgments to 25r 48 

Edwin natural bridge, Utah, Diagram showing origin of 21, 319 

, Photograph of a painting by H. L. A. Culmer 21, 317 

Effusive and Intrusive in the quantitative classification ; A. C. Lane. . 26, 43 

EooERS, Baron, cited on West Indian floras 29, 649 

Eggleston, J. W. ; The complex of alkaline igneous rocks at Cuttings- 

ville, Vermont 21. 32, 785 

EoLESTON, I., Lectures in metallurgy by 27, 515 

Egleston, T., Reference to his discussion of erosion by sand-blast 26, 64 

EiGENMANN, C. 11. ; Fresh-water fish faunas of North and South Amer- 
ica 29, 138 

Ekblaw, W. E., Discussion of post-Glacial uplift in Greenland and Elles- 

mere Land by 29, 71 

— ; Importance of nivation as an erosive factor and of soil flow as a 

transporting agency in northern Greenland 29, 72 

— ; Opportunities for geological work in the far Arctic 29, 85 

Elasmosaurid^, New Plesiosaurlan genus from Nebraska of the family 

24,120 

Elbert, J., cited on Sumbawa Island 29, 561 

Eldridoe, G. H., cited on California oil field 28, 565 

— structural breaks in Denver basin 26, 345 

Election of Auditing Committee 21, 2 ; 22, 2 ; 23, 2 ; 24, 8 ; 

25, 5 ; 26, 11 ; 27, 11 ; 28, H ; 29, 11 ; 30, 11 

Fellows 21,2; 22,2; 23,3; 24,9; 25,6; 

26, 12 ; 27, 12 ; 28, 12 ; 29, 12 ; 30, 12 

Officers 21, 2 ; 22, 2 ; 23, 2 ; 24, 8 ; 25. 5 ; 

26. 11 ; 27, 11 ; 28, 12 ; 29. 11 ; 30, 11 

and Members of Paleontologlcal Society 26. 146 ; 27, 144 ; 

28, 195 ; 29, 125 ; 30, 147 

of Pacific Coast Section of Paleontologlcal Society.. 27,169; 28,223 

Electric furnace, I^gure showing 21, 158 

Elephants, Restoration of 25, 142 

the world series of 25, 407-410 

ELE^•ATED beaches of Lake Michigan discussed by F. B. Taylor 28, 142 

Elie de Beaumont, L., Significance of unconformities shown by 27, 492 

Elizabethtown group, Glacial lakes of 27, 664 

Ellesmere Land, Discussion of uplift in 29, 71 

P^LLis, W., cited on quartz-feldspar 27, 326 

Ellis Bay formation, Anticosti island 21, 701-704 

, (Composition and thickness of 21, 701 

, Correlation of 21, 704 



ELLS ^ENGINEERING 89 

Page 

Klls, R. W., cited on oil sands 28, 597 

pillow lava 25,611 

Embbyology and paleontology; Richard S. Lull and William 11. Dall. .. 21,74 

Kmerald deposits of Muzo, Colombia ; Joseph E. Pogue 27> 63 

Bmebson, B. K. ; Cirques and rock-cut terraces of Mount Toby 22, 681 

— cited on allanite 28, 466 

basalt sheet of Deerfleld 26, 622 

Bellingham series 26, 449 

glacial clays of Connecticut 27, HI 

granite dike 26, 468 

Massachusetts Archean 28, 861 

Milford granite 26, 454 

pillow lava 26,628-629 

porphyry 26, 463 

submergence of the Connecticut Valley 26, 63 

— , Discussion of overthrusts by 28, 160 

— ; Geological suggestions derived from a new arrangement of the ele- 
ments 21, 22, 766 

— , Mapping of quartz diorite area by 26, 452 

— , Pleistocene features of Connecrticut Valley 26, 220, 224 

— . Work in the Diamond Ilill-Cumberland district by 26, 438, 441 

Emebsoiv, F. V. ; Loess-depositing winds in the Louisiana region 29, 79 

— ; Occurrence of intraf orniational conglomerate and breccia 27, 93 

— , Pleistocene formations and **loess" discussed by 23, 48, 738 

Emmons, B., cited on Albany clays 28, 323 

example of crumpling 26, 294 

— , Geological work of 26, 160 

— , State geologist of North Carolina 26, 160 

Emmons, S. F., Bibliography of 23, 24 

— cited on Wasatch Mountain region 21, 518, 530, 539 

— , Discussion on geology of the Wasatch Mountains by 21, 22, 767 

— elected on Auditing Committee 21, 2 

— , Memoir of ; Arnold Hague. 23, 12 

Emmons, W. H., cited on allanite 28, 466 

metamorphism 28, 465 

the Jurassic movement 26, 311 

— , Discussion of platinum-gold lode deposit in southern Nevada by ... . 26, 85 
— , New classification of natural water discussed by. 24, 73 

— quoted on stratigraphy of the Morrison 26, 310 

— , Remarks on effects of pressure on rocks and minerals by 26, 84 

organic origin of some mineral deposits in unaltered Paleozoic 

sediments by 26, 86 

pyrrhotite, norite, and pyroxenlte from Litchfield, Connecticut, 

by 26, 395 

Emobt, W. H., OccurrencHj of epsomite in California noted by 21, 648 

— , Reference to Mexican boundary survey by 26, 165 

Enoelmann, II., cited on Lower Chester sandstone 27, 157 

Engineering geology in and after the war ; C. P. Berkey 30, 81 



90 J. STANLEY-BROWN INDEX TO VOLUMES 21 TO 30 

Page 

Engineers, Geological education for 28, 137 

England, Great oolite formation of 21, W7 

— , Pillow lavas in 25, 603 

— , Mineral Resources Bureau of London 30, 100 

— Silurian section, Bracbiopods of tbe Edmunds fauna in 24, 382 

Englehabdt, H., cited on fossil plants in tuffs 29, 040 

Navidad beds 29,642 

Tertiary floras of Chile 29, 633 

Engleb, C, cited on origin of oil 28, 729 

English, B. L., cited on allanite 28, 465 

English, W. A., Fauna of lower Fernando series 26, 151 

English Head formation, Anticosti island, Correlation of 21, 696 

, List of fauna of 21, 693 

, Zones of 21,693 

E^GSTBOM, N., cited on allanite 28, 472 

Entomolesteb an Eocene Tui)aiid 24, 249 

Environmental conditions surrounding tbe rise of am|)bibians 27, 391 

Eocene and Cretaceous time in Nortb America, Reference to 26, 295 

Ollgo(»ene of California, Relations of 25, 153 

tbe Wind River and Big Horn basins; William J. Sinclair 

and Walter Granger 22, 63, 722 

— , Atlantic and Pacific correlation of 29, 148 

— climate 25, 375 

— correlations to tbe year 1911, Syntbesis of 23, 244 

— Cretaceous contact in Nortb America 25, 342 

correlation in New Mexico, Wyoming, Montana, All>erta 25, 355 

— divisions of California ; B. L. Clark 30, 154 

— (middle and upper) fauna compared witb otber faunas 25, 387 

— faunal borizons of tbe nortbern San Juan basin in New Mexico ; 

Walter (Jranger 28, 216 

— faunas. Progress in revision of 25, 144 

— flora of e<iuatorial America 29, 632 

— floras 30, 529 

— igneous rocks 22, 104 

— in Idabo, Montana, and Wasbington 29, 89 

— leumr Notbarctus, On tbe relationsbii) to tbe Adapidse and to otber 

primates of tbe ; W. K. Gregory 26, 419 

— Lemuroid, Skeleton of 25, 141 

— lemurs, esiHK'ially Notbarctus, Relations of tbe Tupaiidie and of 24, 117, 247 

— Middle, Tpper, and Lower 23, 237, 239 

— Midway formations 25, 332 

— Miocene relationsbips on West CJoast 29, 307 

— (faunal) of California, Geograpby of; R. E. Dickerson 26,416 

— of California, Martinez 25, 154 

, Meganos group of tbp 29, 281 

, New division in 29, 94 

, Section of 29, 285 

, Stratigrapbic relationsbip of 29, 300 






EOCENE — EROSION 91 

Page 

£ocENE of North America, Pseudotapirs of the 29> 152 

San Pedro Point, San Mateo County, California; Roy E. Dickerson 

24, 126 
the Bighorn Basin of Wyoming, Notes on ; W. K. Granger 24, 113 

Coalinga-Cantua district, Fresno County, California; J. A. TafT 24,127 

I 

Gulf region, Correlation of the marine 25, 334 

Lower Cowlitz River Valley, Washington ; Charles E. Weaver. 27, 174 

West Indian Islands 29, 623 

Utah, Artiadactyls from 29, 153 

Washington, Coal-bearing 26, 332 

western Europe 25, 341 

— period in the Rooky Mountain front and Great Plains provinces, 

Physiographic study of the Cretaceous 26, 105 

— shells from Alabama, Reference to 25, 161 

— time in North America, Opening of 25, 321 

— Tupaild, Entomolestes an 24, 240 

Eolation, Destructive versus constructive 21, 581 

— , Mid-Continental ; Charles R. Keyes 22, 54, 687-714 

— under the stimulus of aridity ; Charles R. Keyes 21, 20, 565-598 

EoLiAN sand types, Description of 21, 638-643 

Eouc continental deposits. Origin of 22, 695 

— deposits. Authorities cited on 22, 697-699 

, Characteristics of 22, 699 

— erosive activities, Toyalan6 and Lucero region 23, 717 

EoTiTANOPS, New method of restoring , . 25, 140, 406 

Epeibooenic movement ; Diastrophism, New York State". 24, 159 

— movements. Study of 21, 227 

EpEiBOGETf Y, Note ou 26, 188 

Epiceivtebs in Alaska, Occurrence of 21, 397 

Epioene profiles of the desert ; A. C. Lawson 26, 391 

Epibotic deposition, Genetic relation to regolith of 27, 57 

Equatobial America, Cenozoic floras of 29, 631 

Equid.« and ground sloths, Api>earance of 24, 291 

"Equiijbbium," Definition of 21, 161 

— , Significance of 21, 161 

Equipla NATION in Alaska 23, 344 

Ebom AN, E., cited on chemical deimsition 28, 739 

Ebie outlet, Preglacial 24, 231 

Ebobion and deix)sition in arid ("limates. Topic A, Summer Meeting in 

California, 1915 ; 26, 390 

— (differential) and equiplanation In portions of Yukon and Alaska; 

De Lorme D. Cairnes 23, 48, 333-345 

— and oxidation, Post-Glacial 23, 277-295 

— , Baselevel of eollan 23, 559 

— , Blackfoot peneplain, Montana, and cycles of 24, 534 

— conditions. Relation of glacial and arid 23, 542 

— , Cycle of and Interruption of the cycle of 24, 188, 189 

ice 21, 726 



92 J. STANLEY-BROWN INDEX TO VOLUMES 21 TO 3O 

Page 
Ebosion, Effeot on the Great Basin region by 21, 547 

— , Eolic cliaracter of regional 23, 717 

— , Features of ice-cap 21. 723-730 

Iceland Valley Glacier 21,719-723 

— , Glacial 26, 70, 78 

— in Libyan desert, sand-blast 26, 63 

the Valley of • the Great Lakes 23, 277 

— , Measure of arid 26, 404 

— , Observations on rate of sea cliff 21, 29, 778 

— (stream) south of the Saint Lawrence-Mississippi watershed 23, 280 

Ebosional agents under diverse climatic conditions 23, 539-542 

— effects in arid regions. Classes of 21, 571-580 

— processes under conditions of aridity, Deflation and the relative effi- 

ciencies of 21, 565-598 

— work of glacial streams in New York State 24, 147 

Laurentlan ice-body 27, 648 

Erosive potential of desert \yaters ; Charles Keyes 26, 88 

Ebuptives and calcareous sediments. Table show^ing field associations of 

alkaline and subalkaline. 21, 92-107 

Escambia County, Florida, "Gray sand*' at 21, 635 

EscoMBE, F., cited on plant development 30, 549 

Eskeb, Birds Hill an 21, 26, 407-432 

— fans experimentally studied. Structure of 23, 51, 746 

— , Formation of, by a glacial river 21, 417 

— terraces, Significance of 23, 285 

— , Topographical des<*ription of Birds Hill 21, 407 

EsKEKs and kames, Conditions of the origin of 21, 431, 432 

EspiBiTO Santo, Geologj' of 30, 249 

EsTHONiA, Orthoceras limestone of 27, 590 

Estimates of time based on geologic processes 28, 809 

Etaoe 5 formation of Norway 26, 286 

Etchegoin formation at Coalinga, California 27, 172 

— formations, California 24, 139 

Ethebidoe, Robebt, Jb., cited on Misinia Island 29, 559 

Ethics of the petroleum geologist ; F. G. Clapp 28, 157 

Etna, Height of summit crater of Mount 24, 381 

— , Last great eruption of and i-eference to descriptions of 26, 381-382 

— , Review of history of 28» 270 

Ettingeb, a. E., Photographs of glacial topography by 25, 215 

Ettingshausen, C. von, cited on Tertiary floras of Straits of Magellan 29, 633 

Eubasia, the greatest unit of the earth's plan 21, 190 

— , Relation of North America to 21, 201-205 

— , Suess' description of 21, 186 

EuBOpE and North America, Comparison of the late Pleistocene fauna 

of 21, 120 

— as a factor in the war, Physiographic features of western 26, 110 

— , Chart of storm tracks in 25, 500 

storminess during sun-spot changes 25, 516 



EUROPE — EVIDENCE 93 

Page 

BuBOPE, Cretaceous overlaps in 29> 142 

— , Effect of sun-spots on climate in 25, 549 

— t Migration and succession of human types of the old Stone Age of . . 26. 149 

— , Peripheral ranges in 21, 195-199 

— , Petroleum supply of 28, 612 

— , Phosphate deposits of 30, 104 

— , Record of storminess in 25, 499 

— , Restoration of Pleistocene skulls from 28, 215 

European Cretaceous and Eocene 25, 341 

— Jurassic-Cretaceous division line 26, 296 

— Lower Ordovlcic formation ; A. W. Grabau 27, 555 

— storminess during sun-spot changes, Chart of 25, 518 

maximum and minimum, Chart of 25, 520 

— time scale : 25, 335 

EuBYPTEBiD fauna of the Plttsford shale, Described by Sarle 24, 490 

— horizon, A new 30, 152 

BuBYPTERiDA, Johu M. Clarke and Rudolph Ruedemann presented the 

Paleontological Society with their monograph on the 24, 106 

— , Mode of life of the ; John M. Clarke and Rudolph Ruedemann 21, 76 

EuBYPTERiDS, Distribution and occurrence of ; Summary of M. O'Connell 

24, 499-514 
— , Nebraska 24, 113 

— of New York ; John M. Clarke and R. Ruedemann, quotation from . . 24, 502 

— , Review of the evidence of the distribution of 24, 515 

EuTECTics in complicated mixtures 21, 171 

Evans, E. W., cited on West Virginia oil field 28, 565 

Evans, J. W., cited on feldspars in sedimentary rocks as indices of cli- 
mate '21, 628 

mechanically formed limestone ,. 21, 644, 647, 648 

Evanston peat 29, 237 

Eve, a. S., cited on recent researches on atomic structure in science. . 26,191 

Eveland, a. J., cited on Philippine glaciation 28, 522 

Events leading up to the organization of the Geological Society of Amer- 
ica ; J. J. Stevenson 25, 15 

Evidence as to the mode of formation of coal derived from the deposits 

of Japan, China, and Manchuria ; E. C. Jeffrey and Kono Yasui, 28, 130 

— in San Gorgonio Pass, Riverside County, of a late Pliocene extension 

of the Gulf of Lower California ; F. E. Vaughan 29, 164 

the Helena-Yellowstone Park region, Montana, of tile great Juras- 
sic erosion surface ; D. D. Condit 28, 161 

— of a glacial dam in the Allegheny River between Warren, Pennsylva- 

nia, and Tionesta ; G. P. Wright .• 25, 84, 215 

climatic oscillations in the l*ermo-Carboniferous beds of Texas; 

E. C. Case 25, 41 

recent changes of level in Porto Rico as shown by studies in the 

Ponce district ; G. J. Mitchell 29, 138 

the Paleocene vertebrate fauna on the Cretaceous-Tertiary prob- 
lem ; W. D. Matthew 25, 381 



94 J. STANLEY-BROWN INDEX TO VOLUMES 21 TO 30 

rage 
Evidences for and against the former existence of local glaciers in the 

Green Mountains of Vermont ; J. W. Goldthwait 28t 124 

Evolution of fossils, Prerequisites to the study of 21, 297 

— of geologic climates ; F. IT. Knowlton 30, 499 

the Anthozoa and the systematic position of Paleozoic corals; T. C. 

Brown 26, 157 

vertebrjp ; S. W. Williston 29, 146 

Evolutional uiodiflcation, Environmental change sufficient to i>emiit. 21,297 

Evolutionary evidence ; S. W. Williston 23, 86, 257 

Excursions made by the members of the California Meeting, August, 

1915 26, 407, 417 

Experiment in geology. Presidential address by F. D. Adams 29, 82, 167 

the graphic presentation of the economic geology of bedded de- 

iwslts ; George H. Ashley 27, 122 

Experimental geology, one of the large subdivisions of geology ; Fred- 
erick Eugene Wright 24, 49, 671 

Explanation of the abandoned beaches about the south end of Lake 

Michigan ; G. F. Wriglit 29. 235 

elevated beaches surrounding the south end of Lake Michigan ; 

G. Frederick Wright 28, 142 

Extension of the Montana phosphate deposits northward into Canada ; 

Frank D. Adams and Wm. J. Dick 27, 62 

External structure of steganoblastus as revealed through gum mount- 
ings and photomicrographic stereograms; G. IL Hudson 28,203 

Extinct animals. Reconstruction of 27, 153 

— organisms, Anatomy and physiology in 21, 74 

— vertebrate faunas from the badlands of Bautlsta Creek and San Tiino- 

tfeo Canyon of southern California ; Childs Frick 29, 154 

Eyerman, John, cited on allanite 28, 472 



Faceted form of a collapsing geoid ; C. R. Keyes 29, 76 

Fairbanks, H. W., Slates of Slate Springs, California, as described by 24, 131 
— ; Some topographical features of the western side of the Colorado 

desert 21, 793 

Fairchild, H. L. ; Acknowledgments to 29, 336 

— , Harold L. Ailing introduced by 27, 75 

— , Beginnings of Lifke Agassiz discussed by 24, 71 

— , Chairman Section of Glacial and Physiographic Geology 21. 25 

— cited on elevation at close of Glacial period 27, 191 

Gill>ert gulf 21, 242 

glacial lakes in the Adirondacks 27, 653-654, a'>6-657, 664 

waters in central New York 21, 242 

Ice erosion a fallacy 26, 70 

Lake Iro<iuois 21, 241 

Laurentian ice-body 27, 647 

Pleistocene geology of western New York 2I, 242 



FAIRCHILD — FAULT 95 

I'nge 

Fairchild, H. L., citcKl on I'lelstcx'ene phenomena of New York 27, 646 

post-Glaoial deformation 27, 668-669 

— ; Closing phase of glnciation in New York 23, 47, 737 

— , Covey Hill revisited discussed by 23, 36, 722 

— , Deformation of the Algonquin Beach discusseil by 24, 71 

— , Discussion of glacial dejwsits in Ontario by 25, 72 

on anticlines in the Chagrin shales at Cleveland, Ohio, by 21, 24, 773 

— elected President Geological Society for 1912 23, 2 

— , First session T^venty-flfth Annual Meeting called to order by Presi- 
dent 24, 2 

— , Glacial cirques discussed by 24, 51 

— , Member of Auditing Committee 26, 11 

— , Memorial of Joseph Le Conte by 26, 47 

— , Moraines of Ontario and western New York discusseii by 23, 46 

— ; Pleistocene features in the Schenectad,v-Sara toga-Glens Falls sec- 
tion of the Hudson Valley 27, 65 

marine submergence of the (.Connecticut and Hudson valleys. . 25,63,219 

— ; I'leistocene uplift of New York and adjacent territory 27, 66, 235 

— , Post-GIacial erosion and oxidation discussed by 23, 47, 738 

marine submergence of Long Island 28, 142, 279 

uplift of New England coastal region 30, 89 

northeastern America 29, 70, 187 

southern New England 30, 597 

— , Presiding over first section 24, 50, 70 

— , Reference to "The Pleistocene geologj' of New York State" of 27, 646 

— , retiring I^resident, Address by 24, 54 

— ; Review of the early history of the Society 25, 17 

— , Speculative nature of geologj' discussed by 24, 70 

— , Temponiry chairman Glaciology and Physiography Section 21, 21 

— , Thanks rendered to 27, 645 

— , Vote of thanks proposed by 26, 124 

— and Chadwick, G. H. ; Iroquois and inferior waters in northern New 

York (extempore) 22, 64 

Fairmont, Illinois, limestone quarry 26, 70 

Fanglomkrate, a detrital rock at Battle Mountain, Nevada ; Andrew O. 

Lawson 23, 72 

Faroe Islands, Pillow lavas of 25, 610 

Farrington, O. C, Discussion of change in quartz through rise of tem- 
perature by 25, 44 

oolites of Chimney Hill formation by 25, 76 

Park City minerals by 25, 48 

— ; New minerals from the Favas of Brazil 23, 37, 728 

— ; Quantitative classification of meteorites 22, 67, 736 

— . Remarks on meteorites by 27, 50 

Fassio, O. L., cited on tropical hurricanes . * 25, 494 

— ; Signal Corps School of Meteorology 30, 106 

Fault, The Baishiko, Formosa 22, 173 

— , Figures show^ing combination of finite rotations at a 21, 738 



96 J.STANLEY-BROWN INDEX TO VOLUMES 21 TO 30 

Page 

Fault In Wasatch range, Huntsvllle 21, 540 

— , Inherited conception of a 22, 166 

— line scarps, Imaginary example of resequent 24, 211 

, Obsequent 24, 203 

^— maps, Difficulties in the way of securing 22, 165 

— , Neo Valley (Japan) earthquake 22, 173 

— , New light on the Keweenawan 24, 76, 718 

— , Problem demonstrating rotation at a 21, 737 

— , Reference to methods for determining displacement at a 21, 737 

— , San Jos^ and Mount Hamilton Calaveras-Sunol .' 24, 96 

— scjirps. Examples of initial and young and of maturely dissected 

24, 196, 200 

— of desert ranges. False ; Charles Keyes 26, 65 

— slipping in the California Coast Range region, A possible causal 

mechanism for heave ; H. O. Wood 26, 404 

— system. Example of 22, 168 

— translatory movements. General discussion of terms of 24, 168 

, Stratified rocks, slip, shift, separation, throw and heave, Ap- 
parent displacements 24, 168-176 

— valleys, Subsequent 24. 202 

Faulted structures. Definition of terms used in describing forms on . . 24, 214 

, Forms produced by other than normal proc^esses on 24, 213 

, Ideal series of forms on 24, 191 

, Initial and young forms on 24, 192 

, Mature and old forms on 24, 197, 203 

, References to authors' work relating to 24, 215 

, Second-cycle forms and examples of, on 24, 205, 209 

Faulting in north-central Kentucky ; Arthur M. Miller 27, 101 

r- Owens Valley, California, Recent 21, 792 

the Great Basin, Basin range 29, 138 

— , Physiographic evidence of 24, 198 

Faults, Additional note on the geometry of 21, 737-740 

— and Joints comprised in one system 22, 166 

obsequent ravine heads 24, 202 

— , Classes of strike 24, 178 

— classified according to direction of movement 24, 176 

— , Deductions concerning the nature of 22, 165 

— , Essential principle in the physiographic description of 24, 195 

— , Evidence furnished from earthquake 22, 173 

— , Extension of the words "normar' and "reverse** to diagonal and dip 24, 177 

— , General classes of loc^al movements on 24, 167 

terms of 24, 165 

— , Geologic map of vicinity of Ogden, Utah, showing overthrusts and 

normal 21, 535 

— , Groups of : Peripheral : Radial 24, 179 

— in monoclinal structures. Transverse 24, 204 

Wasatch range, Transverse 21, 539 

— , Inconsistency in use of terms relating to 24, 163 



FAULTS — FAUNA 97 

rage 

Faults, Mechanics of 21, 25, 766 

— , The nomenclature of, by Harry Fielding Reld (read by title) 22, 54 

— , Preliminary report of the Committee on the Nomenclature of 23, 50 

— , Relation to the cycle of erosion of 24, 190 

— , Report of Committee on Nomenclature of 24, 49, 163 

— , Rotatory movements on 24, 179 

— , Special classes of .• 24, 178 

— , Special terms : A horst; A graben; A fault block; The pitch 24, 180 

— , Sudden changes of throw on 22, 171 

— , Suggestions for teaching, with diagrams of 24, 181 

Fauna, Aftonian mammalian 21, 120 

— and relations of the white shales of the Coallnga district ; J. H. Ruck- 

man 26, 168 

— from Deadmans Island, Molluscan 27, 173 

— in the Lower Monterey of Contra Costa County, California ; B. L. 

Clark 26, 167 

marine Tertiary of California, Vertebrate.*. 26, 168 

Morrison, The invertebrate 26, 90, 151, 343-348 

Rattlesnake Pliocene of eastern Oregon, Review of the; J. C. 

Merriam 26, 169 

Siphonalia sutterenHs zone in the Roseburg quadrangle, Oregon; 

R. E. Dickerson 26, 169 

— , New Miocene mammalian 27, 170 

— , Niagara group of Hall in Rochester shale (Hartnagel, 1907) 24, 381 

— of Antlcosti, Quotation from E. Billings on 21, 678 

Eighteen-mile Creek, New York, Fish 26, 154 

Europe and North America, Comparison of the late Pleistocene. . 24, 120 

Hawver Cave, Pleistocene mammal 27, 169 

lower Fernando series ; W. A; English 25, 151 

southern California 29, 154 

the Bautista Creek badlands ; Childs Frick 29, 163 

Cumberland Pleistocene cave deposits ; J. W. Gidley 25, 142 

Etchegoin Pliocene of middle California; J. O. Nomland 28,229 

Fernando formation -of Los Angeles, California; C. L. Moody. 28,212 

Girardeau limestone and of the Edge\vood formation ; T. E. 

Savage 21, 76 

Idaho formation ; J. C. Merriam 29, 162 

Tulare Pliocene of the Pacific Coast region ; J. C. Merriam . 29, 152 

Meganos group, B. L. Clark 29, 152 

Oklahoma Pleistocene 28, 212 

OUgocene ( ?) of Oregon ; F. M. Anderson 25, 154 

Pinole tuff ; John C. Merriam and Chester Stock 28, 230 

rodeo Pleistocene; John C. Merriam, Chester Stock, and C. L. 

Moody 26, 169 

San Pablo series 25, 152 

Scutella Jyreweriana zone of the Upper Monterey series 25, 151 

Tejon group in the Cautua district of the Coalinga quadrangle, 

California ; Roy B. Dickerson 27, 173 

VII — Bull. Geol. See. Am. 



98 J. STANLEY-BROWN INDEX TO VOLUMES 21 TO 30 

Page 
Fauna of the Tejon group In San Diego County ; Roy E. Dickerson . . . 27, 173 

— , Recurrent Haniilton 21, 287 

— , Tribes Hill or Lower Beekmantown and Bucks Bridge 26, 289 

— , Wealden, Potomac, Kootenai, Bear River, Dakota, Sundance, and 

Washita Invertebrate 26, 344-348 

Faunal and stratigraphic relations of the later Eocene of the Pacific 

coast ; Harold Hannibal 26, 168 

Lincoln formation in Washington; C. K. Weaver 26.169 

— continuity, Evidence of 21, 292, 297 

— geography of the Eocene of California ; R. E. Dickerson 26, 416 

— migrations and diastrophlsm 25, 397-399 

— relations of the San Ix)renzo Oligocene to the Eocene in California . 25, 153 
Upper Neocene in the Sargent oil fields, California ; Bruce 

Martin 24, 129 

— studies in the Cretaceous of the Santa Ana Mountains of southern 

California ; Earl L. Packard 27, 174 

— succession of Chester Group in Illinois and Kentucky 27, 156 

— zones of Pliocene formations, Vertebrate 27, 172 

the Martinez Eocene of California ; R. E. Dickerson 25, 154 

Oligocene; B. L. Clark 29,166 

San Pablo formation east of Walnut Creek, near Mount 

Diablo, California ; John P. Buwalda 24, 130 

Faunas, Contemporaneity of 21, 294 

— contrasted. Migration of species and shifting of 21, 290 

— , Fixed and fluctuating characters of 21, 293 

— , Hypothesis of recurrents and shifting of 21, 285 

— In the John Day region, Succession of Miocene 28, 215 

— (invertebrate). Correlation between those of California and Mexico 26,414 

of the American Triassic : relations to those of Asia and Europe 26, 412 

— , Li tho logic changes not sufficient to account for difference in 21, 289 

— , Magma and local special 21, 293 

— , Ocean water determined the shifting or migration of 21, 289 

— of California, Review of the Miocene and Oligocene 26. 416 

Japan and western United States, Comparison of Cretaceous 26,414 

the EastiX)rt quadrangle, Maine, Correlation of the Paleozoic 23,83. 

349-352 

problems suggested by a study of the 24, 377-397 

Girardeau and Edgewood limestone 24. 112, 358, 368 

Morrison, Comparison with other non-marine invertebrate. . . . 26,344 

Pacific Coast region. Vertebrate ; J. C. Merriam 26. 416 

Santa Ana Mountains, Cretaceous 26, 169 

— , On the derivation of Paleozoic 22, 96 

— , Ordovician and Silurian polar 22, 92 

— , Rare and dominant si^ecles 21. 293 

— , Recurrence of > 21, 292 

— , Reversal of order in succession of 21, 286 

— , Rochester shale, Edmunds si)ecies of the Gotland section, Bohemian 

E* and Podllian 24,381-385 



FAUNAS AFIELD 99 

VsLge 
Faunas, Shifting and migration of Devonian 21, 76, 285-294 

Fayalite in the granite of Rockport, Massachusetts; Charles Pal ache. . 

21, 33. 767 

Faycm fauna. Groups and arrangement of 23, 157 

, Location and elements of the 23, 156 

Featherstonhauoh, G. W., Geological researches of 25, 163 

Feldspar, Analyses of normative 27, 200, 216 

— basalts, with phonolites, Islands of Kerguelen, Fernando Noronha, 

and Saint Helena composed of 21, 89 

Feldspars, Isomorphism and thermal properties of the 21, 156, 165 

— , Melting curves of the. Figure showing 21, 157 

FELiDiC of Rancho La Brea ; J. C. Merriam 28, 211 

— , Phylogeny of the 21, 74 

Fellows, Deceased, List of 21. 67 ; 22, 82 ; 23, 67 ; 24, 80 ; 

26, 117 ; 26, 127 ; 27, 138 ; 28. 188 ; 29, 117 ; 30, 129 

— . Election of 21, 3 ; 22, 3 ; 23, 3 ; 24, 9 ; 

25, 6 ; 26, 12 ;-27, 12 ; 28, 12 ; 29, 12 ; 30, 12 

— . List of 21, 54 ; 22. 72 ; 23, 56 ; 24, 80 ; 

25, 108 ; 26, 118 ; 27, 128 ; 28, 178 ; 29, 108 ; 30, 120 

Felsophyre and related rocks. Analyses of 24, 310 

Fenneman, N. M., Walter A. Bucher introduced by 27, 109 

— cited on Coastal Plain oil fields 28, 578 

— , Discussion of intraformatlonal corrugation 25, 37 

— , Preglacial Miami and Kentucky rivers 23, 51, 736 ; 25, 85 

Fenwer, C. N., N. L. Bowen introduced by 25, 91 ; 27, 48 

— cited on crystallization temperature 26, 269 

Pennsylvania Precambrian 29, 376 

pillow lava 25,624,628 

— , Discussion of Acadian Triasslc by .\ 26, 94 

effects of pressure on recks and minerals by 26, 84 

. — ; Mode of formation of certain gneisses in the highlands of New Jer- 
sey 25, 44 

— on gold "strike" at Cresson mine, Cripple Creek, Colorado, by 26, 85 

— ; Relationship between the igneous and metamorphic roc»ks of the Dis- 
trict of Columbia and vicinity 28, 155 

— ; The various forms of silica and their mutual relations 24, 53, 681 

Ferguson, J. B., Chemical analysis of black obsidian from Iceland by. 26,259 

Fermor, Leigh, cited on radioactive transformations 26, 194 

Fern, New generic type of fossil 22, 91 

Fernando series, Fauna of Lower 25, 151 

Fernte shales in Alberta Cretaceous 27, 677 

Ferrous iron content and magnetic properties of the natural oxides of 

iron as an index to their origin and history; K. B. Sosman and 

J. C. Hostetter 27, 60 

Ficus from the interglacial deposits of the Kootenay Valley, British 

Columbia, New species of ; Arthur Ilollick 26, 159 

Field, R. M. ; Intraformatlonal structure in the Ordovician limestone of 

central Pennsylvania 28, 166 



100 J. STAXLEY-BROWN INDEX TO VOLUMES 21 TO 30 

Field Museum, Chicago, Skeletons of largest known dinosaur in 26, 153 

— relations of litchfleldlte and soda-syenite of Litchfield, Maine; R. A. 

Daly 29. 99, 463 

Fiji, Geology of Lau Islands of 28, 166 

Fillmore, Utah, Gypsum dunes at 21, 647 

Final results in the phylogeny of the tltanotheres ; H. F. Osborn 25, 139 

f^NGEB Lakes, Discussion concerning 23. 478 

FiNiAY, G. L, cited on gneiss 28, 456, 458 

FiOBE, O. DE, cited on eruptions and bibliography of Vesuvius 26, 376 

Stromboli 28, 253. 255 

FiBE at Mount Holyoke announced 29, 84 

First recorded amphibian from the Tertiary of Nebraska ; H. J. Cook 28, 213 

Fischer, P., Reference to **Sur quelques fossiles de 1' Alaska" of 27, 699 

Fish fauna from the Pennsylvanian of Wyoming ; E. B. Branson 23, 87 

of the conodont bed (Basal Genesee) at Eighteen-mile Creek, New 

York ; L. Hussakof and W. L. Bryant 26, 154 

Fisher, C. A., cited on Kootenai and Morrison formations 26, 341 

Texas oil occurrence 28. 708 

the relation of the Morrison to the Kootenai 26, 304 

Fisher, F. A. ; Rocky Mountain oil fields 28, 157 

Fishes from Brazil, Fossil 30, 246 

the Caney shales, Brain structure of fossil 24, 119 

— of Missouri, Devonian 24> 119 

the Old Red Sandstone 27. 399 

Fissure deposit, Hawver Cave a 27, 169 

Five Islands, Nova Scotia, Barite deposits of 21, 33, 786 

Flattening of limestone gravel boulders by solution ; J. A. Udden 25, 66 

Flech, H., Analyses by 27, 640 

Fleming, John, cited on Old Red Sandstone 27, 349 

Flett, J. S., cited on flint 30, 392 

metamorphlsm , 28, 387 

Old lied Sandstone of the Shetland Islands 27, 362, 378, 384 

origin of pillow lavas and structure. 26, 636, 644 

pillow lava 25,604,606-607 

— , Reference to "On the age of the Old Red Sandstone of Shetland" by 

27, 363, 378 

Flexures, Relations of the mountain ranges to 2I, 558-562 

Flints of northern France 30, 389 

Flooding of south shore of Iroquois, Reference by H. L. Falrchild to. . 27,247 
Flora of Alaska, Results of a preliminary investigation of the Kenal; 

Arthur HolUck 22, 91 

Florissant ; T. D. A. Cockerell 26, 416 

southwestern Wyoming, I<aramie 21, 75 

Floral evidence in marine strata, The value of, as indicative of near- 
ness of shores ; David White 22, 93, 221 

— features of the Cycadeoidea? ; G. R. Wleland 24, 115 

Floras in the western "Red beds," Permian 21, 75 

— of Alaska, Correlation of the Cretaceous and Tertiary 24, 116 



FLORAS FORCHHAMMER 101 

Page 
Floras of California compared with those of other Cretaceous areas, 

Cretaceous 26, 414 

— , Recurrent 27, 527 

f^OBiDA coral-reef tract compared with other coral-reef areas 25, 41 

— , Dead lake of the Chipola River in 27, 109 

— , Escambia County, "Gray sand" at 21, 635 

— , Fossil vertebrates from 28, 214 

— , Geological work in 25, 1T4 

— , Megatherium from 28, 212 

— , Natural bridges In 21, 331 

— , Origin of the hard rock phosphates of 24, 75, 716 

— , Plants and human remains at Vero 28, 197 

— , Stratigraphic relations of the fossil vertebrate localities of 26, 154 

FioBiDiAN shoal-water corals 27, 154 

Fu>BissANT, Flora of ; T. D. A. Cockerell 26, 416 

I<\ow-BR£CCiAB in Colorado, Occurrence of ; H. B. Patton 26, 399 

Ft.uoBiTE in Wisconsin 29, 104 

Fluospab in the Ordovician limestone of Wisconsin ; R. M. Bagg 29, 393 

— veins of Jefferson County, Colorado, Primary chalcocite in the 26, 84 

Fluting of crystalline rocks in the tropics ; J. C. Branner 24, 94 

Fluyiatile hypothesis of origin of Great Plains deposits. Weakness of. 22,91 

Flux for basalt, Limestone or dolomite a 21, 109 

Foeeste, a. F., Cambrian boulders found by 25, 460 

— , The Cataract discussed by 24, 107 

— cited on fauna of Brassfleld formation of 25, 291 

fossiliferous localities of Diamond Hill-Cumberland district 25,444-446 

cited on geanticline 27, 103 

Platymerella mannienais * 27, 306, 311 

Silurian formations 28, 808 

— , Discussion of Hamilton group of western New York by 26, 113 

phylogeny of crinoids by 25, 135 

Tendaguru formations by 28, 203 

— , Paper on the Cremacrinid^p, by E. O. Ulrich, read by 24, 109 

— presiding at meeting of Paleontological Society 28, 197 

— ; Richmond formations of the provinces of Ontario and Quebec in 

Canada 24, 110 

— ;To what part of tlie Richmond does the Medina of Ontario corre- 

spond? 23, 83 

Fontaine, W. M., Bibliography of 25, 10 

— cited on allanite 28, 475, 477 

Blue Ridge syenite. 27, 196 

unakite * 27, 196 

— , Memorial of 25, 6 

— -, Photograph of 25, 6 

FoRAUiNiFERA, Pliocene and Pleistocene from California 21, 76 

FoBBES, D., cited on experimental geology 29, 179 

Forbes, Edwabd, Reference to work of 28, 73S 

FoBCHHAUMEB, J. G., Cited on experiments with sand grains 21, 641 



102 J. STANLEY-BROWN INDEX TO VOLUMES 21 TO 30 

Page 

FoBCHHAMMEB, J. G., Reference to work of 28, 738 

FoBD, W. E., cited on allanite 28, 478 

FoBEL, AUGUSTE, Work on ants referred to 21, 452, 454 

"F0BE8T Glen epoch," Name given by J. W. Spencer 21, 439 

Formation names, Bibliography of 25, 50 

— of Ontario, New cystid from the Clinton 21, 76 

FoBMEB exte|ision of the Devonian formations in southeastern Missouri ; 

Stuart Weller 27, 160 

FoBBESTEB, RoBEBT, Mesaverde fossils collected in southwestern Ck)lorado 

by 23, 590 

FoBSHEY, C. G., Geological work in Louisiana of 25, 172 

FoBT Cassin formation, Piloceras of horizon of 21, 688 

— Hall Indian Reservation, Geologic map of 27, 64 

, Mesozoic formations in 27, 70 

— Union fauna, Characters of the 25, 389-390 

flora 25, 334 

formation, Correlation of the 25, 334 

Fossil algae of Colorado and Utah 27, 159 

the Ordovlcian iron ores of Wabana, Newfoundland; G. Van 

Ingen 26, 148 

— birds of the west coast, Some problems encountered in the study of ; 

L. n. Miller 26, 417 

— Cephalopods 24, 129 

— contents, "Matching" of 27, 472 

— deer from Argentina 27, 153 

— deposits of Macclesfield, England 25, 211 

Moel Tryfaen, Wales 25, 210-211 

— fauna of Mingan formation, List of 21, 689-692 

— faunas. Problems in correlating 24, 387-396 

— fern, A new generic type of 22, 91 

— fishes from Brazil 30, 246 

the Caney shales, Brain structures of «. . . 24, 119 

— floras of the Atlantic Coastal Plain, Status of the study of the ; Ed- 

ward W. Berry 24, 114 

— f ucoids 25 J272 

— genus Rhipidomella, Persistence of fluctuating variations as illus- 

trated by 21, 76, 296-312 

— graptolites from Alaska 25, 194 

— invertebrates of the "Laramie" formation, southwest Colorado 23, 591 

— leaves from Dakota sandstone 29, 131 

— localities of Diamond Ilill-Cumberland district 25, 444 

— mammals discussed by E. H. Barbour 28, 210 

C. W. Gilmore 28,210 

W. K. Gregory 28, 210 

^ W. D. Matthew 28, 210 

J. C. Merriam 28, 210 

H. F. Osborn 28,210 

from Porto Rico; II. E. Anthony 28,209 



FOSSIL FOSSILS 103 

Page 
Fossil mammals of the Tiffany beds; W. D. Matthew and Walter 

Granger 29» 152 

— medusae from Cambrian rocks of British Columbia ; Charles D. Wal- 

cott 22, 95 

— plants from central and western New Mexico and southwestern Colo- 

rado, Table showing distribution of 23, 606 

the "Laramie," New Mexico 23, 617 

, Use in correlation of 27, 525 

— reptiles, Homology of the "Lacrimal" and of the "Allsphenoid" in 

recent and 24, 241 

— rock-bearing animals discussed by G. H. Chadwick 28, 199, 965 

— sauropods 30> 383 

— sponges 25, 272 

— turtles accredited to the Judith River formation. Remarks on 22,95 

— vertebrate localities of Florida, Stratigraphic relations of the 26,154 

— vertebrates from Florida ; B. H. Sellards 28, 214 

FoBSiUFEBOUS Auderdon limestone at Amherstburg, Ontario, Photograph 

of 27. 324 

— conglomerates ; A. W. Grabau 23, 83 

— gravel and sand beds of Iowa and Nebraska, Evidence they are Af to- 

nian ; B. Shimek 21, 31, 120-140 

— zones. Alternate appearance of diverse 21. 287, 288 

FossiLiZATioN, Conditions of, in the Permian beds of northern Texas. 21,250 

— in the Paleozoic Lycopods, Note on a process of ; E. M. Kindle 24. 115 

Fossils, Absence in deltas of 23, 415 

— along Nelson River, Paleozoic 30, 346 

— , Anticosti and Mingan islands 21, 678-716 

island Chicotte formation 21, 715 

— as evidence of terrestrial deposits. Terrestrial 23, 443 

— , Becsie River formation 21, 705-708 

— described by Prof. Samuel Calvin, List of 23, 6 

— , Description of in the Quantico slate belt and the association of vol- 
cano-sedimentary beds with the slates of the Virginia crystalline 
regions ; T. L. Watson and S. L. Powell 21, 31, 782 

— , Distribution of Aftoniau 21, 125 

— from Belly River beds 25, 370 

Big Walker Mountain, Virginia 24, 453 

Edmonton-Pierre contact 25, 368 

Hudson Bay region, Silurian .* 30, 353-370 

Maine Pleistocene 28. 309 

Maryland, Marine 30, 576 

Morgan formation, List of ^ 21, 531 

North Cayuga and Walpole townships, Ontario 23, 373, 375 

Oklahoma oil field 28, 159 

Permo-Triassic of Arizona 30, 471-491 

Red Deer River district, Canada 25, 362 

Shammatawa River 30, 349 

Sherburne sandstone 30, 427-464 



104 J. STANLEY-BROWN INDEX TO VOLUMES 21 TO 30 

Pag» 

Fossils from the Alexandrian rocks, Photograph of 27i 324 

Cambrian of South Attleboro, Massachusetts ; W. B. Hall 21, 76 

Girardeau, Edgewood, Essex, and Sexton Creek limestones, Alex- 
andrian series in Missouri and Illinois 24, 358, 371 

Lance formation 26> 352 

McKenzie formation 24, 486 

Meganos of California 29.289,292 

Paskapoo beds in Alberta 26, 389 

Upper Fort Union beds 25, 389-390 

Tully limestone 28. 956-958 

Wyoming Amsden formation 29. 312 

— , Function in stratigraphic taxonomy of 27, 457 

— , Gun River formation ^ 21, 708-713 

— in correlation. Proper use of 27, 451 

— , Jupiter River, Anticosti island 21, 713-715 

— , Lake Minnewanka section, Alberta 24, 112 

— named in honor of Prof. Samuel Calvin 23, 7 

— of Anticosti island. The long-ranging species 21, 683 

Cataract fauna 25, 281-285 

Cernaysian fauna 25, 395 

deltas 24, 405 

Don River beds 25, 210 

Edmonton formation 25, 365-367, 374-376 

Galena formation 25, 270 

Hell Creek formation 25, 357-359 

lower limestone of Steep Rock series ; Charles D. Walcott. . . . 23, 46, 723 

Medina fauna 25,288-290 

OJo-Alamo beds 25, 379-380 

Oligocene plants from Montana 29, 147 

Paleocene formations of Europe 25, 322 

Paskapoo formation 25, 371-373 

the Devonian 30, 427 

Geneva quartzite. List and classification of 21, 527 

the New York Clinton 29,341 

titanotheres 25, 403-405 

— , The oldest ; Andrew C. Lawson 24, 97 

— on Long Island, Reference to 25, 242 

— , Paleocene vertebrate 25, 383-385 

— , Prerequisites to the study of evolution of 21, 297 

— , L^se in correlation of 27, 149 

Foster, J. W., cited on Keweenaw series 27, 94 

Foster, R. C, cited on riebeckite granite 25, 470 

FouQufe, F. A., cited on experimental geology 29, 175 

Fourteenth century, Glaciation of 27, 67 

FowLE, F. E., cited on solar radiation 25, 83 

volcanoes and climates 30, 562 

volcanic relation to climatic changes 25, 483-484 

Fox, H., cited on pillow lava 25, 603, 605 



FOX ^FRONTIER 105 

Page 

Fox Hills formation, Relationship of the Pierre to the 25, 356 

section 2 5 , 330 

FoTE, W. G., cited on island subsidence 29, 500 

— ; Geology of Lan Islands, Fiji 28, 166 

Fraas, Eberhabd, cited on Tendaguru series 29, 264 

Fbactube field, Correlation of 22, 148 

— fields. Disorderly 22, 155 

of North America, Controlled 22, 148 

which exhibit control, European 22, 158 

— pattern of the earth*s shell, The primary 22, 163 

— system, The African 22, 162 

model 22, 171 

— systems and planetary dislocations. Reference to Transactions of the 

Wisconsin Academy of Science on 22, 151 

France, American mapping in 30, 110 

— , Chalk, flints and groundwater of northern 30, 380 

— "Chalk streams'' of northern 30, 91 

— , Pillow lavas of 25, 589 

— , Reference to mammal-bearing tiorizons in 25, 323 

Fkanciscan series, the San Jos4 and Mount Hamilton quadrangles. 

Thickness of 24, 96 

Fbancoxia sandstone 28, 443 

Frankfort and Utica shales of the Mohawk Valley ; Rudolf Ruedemann 

22, 63, 720 

Franklin, Benjamin, Reference to work of 29, 171 

Frazer, Persifor, Death announced by secretary 21, 4 

— , Memoir of ; R. A. F. Penrose, Jr 21, 5-12 

Frech, F., cited on Lethaea Geognostica 27, 557 

marine Triassic rocks and Alpine forms 27, 688 

— , Reference to "Die zirkum pacifische Trias" of 27, 707, 714-716 

Free^ E. E., cited on climatic changes in Southwest 25, 558-562 

— , Physiographic features of bolsons discussed by 26, 393 

— , Report of experiments with sand grains 21, 635 

Freight classificatibn, Resolution concerning t22, 91 

— rates, Resolution adopted concerning 22, 63 

Fresh-water fish faunas of North and South America ; C. H. Eigenmann 

29, 138 

Frew, W. N., Address of welcome given by 22, 2 

Frick, Childs ; Extinct vertebrate faunas from the badlands of Bautista 

Creek and San Timoteo Canyon of southern California 29, 154 

— ; Fauna of the Bautista Creek badlands 29, 163 

Feiedel, , cited on experimental geology 29, 183 

FrieoiJCnder, I., cited on "repose" conditions of Vesuvius 26, 376 

Frisbie, E. R., cited on laud subsidence at Manila 28, 521 

Fritz, H., cited on sun-spots and related phenomena . . . : 25, 553 

— , Reference to compilation of sun-spots by 28, 825 

Frontier formation, Coal-bearing members of the 25, 346 



106 J. STANLEY-BROWN INDEX TO VOLUMES 21 TO 30 

Page 

Fbuh, J., cited on natural bridge over the Thur near Knimmenau, 

Switzerland 21, 325 

bridges in Greece and Soutli America 21, 323 

of Switzerland 21, 333, 334 

Pont d'Arc, France 21,317 

Travertine natural bridges 21, 336 

Fbyes Hill, Composition of top of 21, 747 

or "The Knob," New York, Richmond l)oulder train extending from 

21, 747 

FucHS, Theodob, cited on epipterygoid 28, 981 

FiJcHSEL, G. C, cited on geologic chronology 27, 491 

PuLLEB, M. L. ; Appalachian oil field 28, 156, 617 

— cited on geology of Long Island 28, 281, 284, 297, 303, 305 

New England submergence 30, 599 

peneplains 29, 581 

FuMABOLE deposits of South Italian volcanoes 27, 61 

FuMABOLES of Vesuvius, Perret, Mercalli, Malladra ; and Friediander 

cited on temperature of 26, 377 

FuNA FuTi boring, W. T. Vaughan on .... T 26, 60 

FuNEBAL range, Apparent folding of Tertiary beds of the, ilgure show- 
ing 21, 551 

FuBCBiEA of the West Indies 29, 652 

FuBNACEViLLE irou ore 29, 343 

FuBTHEB evidence of the age of the crystalline and semi-crystalline rocks 

in Alabama ; W. F. Prouty 30, 113 

— light on the earlier stratigraphy of the Canadian Cordillera; L. D. 

Burling 29, 145 

— studies in the New York Siluric ; G. II. Chadwick. 29, 92 

FuTTEBEB, Kabl, Predominance of faults in southern Alps shown by . . 22, 162 

G 

Gabb, W. M., cited on California Eocene 29. 282 

Shastan series 27, 509 

Gabbbo, Ilmenite-apatite 27, 228 

— of Diamond Hill-Cumberland district 25, 449 

Gabbbos, Analyses of 27, 229 

Gaetano Platama quoted on activity of Stromboli : 26, 387 

Gage, R. B., Analyses by 27, 640 

Gale, H. S., cited on chemical evidence regarding Owens Lake 27,67 

climatic changes in Southwest 26, 559 

Lake strands 25, 564 

Weber quartzite ^. 21, 531 

Galena formation, Conglomerate in the 25, 269 

— Trenton series, Conglomerates of the 25, 265 

Gaucia, Oil fields of 28, 563 

Galloway. J. J., and Cumings, E. R. ; Studies of the mon>hology and 

histology of the Trepostomata or Monticuliporoids 26, 158, 349-374 



GALWAY — GEIKIE 107 

Page 

Galway, Ireland, Formation of dunes of 21, 647 

Gannett, Henry, cited on I^ke Bonneville 28, 360 

Philippines 28, 515 

Ganoid fishes, Subsequent evolution related to 27, 429 

Gannts quarry, Photograph of 27, 449 

Gardiner, C. I., cited on pillow lavas 25, 608 

Gardner, J. H., cited on Puereo and Torrejon fauna 26, 401 

Texas oil field 28, 575 

— ; Mid-continent oil fields 28, 157, 685 

— ; Oil pools of southern Oklahoma and northern Texas 26, 102 

— ; Stratigraphie disturbance through the Ohio Valley, running from 

the Appalachian Plateau in Pennsylvania to the Ozark Mountains 

In Missouri 26, 66, 47r 

— ; Table of section of Cretaceous rocks measured near Durango, Colo- 
rado 23, 584-589 

Gardner, J. S., cited on age of Antrim basalts 28, 875 

coral reefs 29, 530 

— ; Fauna and geography of the Maldive and Laccadive archipelagoes, 

Reference to 22, 239 

Garfias, v. R., cited on igneous intrusions in oil fields 28. 585 

Garnetiferous hornblende schist of New Hampshire 25, 75 

Garrett, W. L., Analysis of Casiano oil well numl>er 7 by 24, 265 

Gas and oil accumulation '. 28, 158 

— at Cleveland, Ohio, Natural 26, 102 

— fields, Classification of 28, 553 

— , natural, fields in the northern Appalachians, Present and future of ; 

F. G. Clapp 21, 34, 788 

Gases, Explanation of juvenile and resurgent 21, 113 

— of Kilauea, Studies and analyses of tables of 24, 586-594 

Ga8p£, Pleistocene submergence at 29, 217 

Gaupp, , cited on ala temporalis 28, 981 

Geiger, L., cited on intensity of earthquake waves 26, 172 

Geikie, Archibald, cited on Cretaceous of England 25, 341 

estimates of geologic time 28, 754, 811 

gneiss 28, 457 

island subsidence 29, 492 

lithologic sequence in France and England 25, 336 

metamorphism 28, 382 

monoclines 27, 90, 91 

Old Red Sandstona 27.349,353,370-371,379,381.383,384 

origin of pillow lavas 25, 638-650 

pillow lava 25, 602, 603, 605, 606, 607, 608, 609, 610-Ci35 

stratigraphy of Old Red Sandstone of Orkney Islands 27, 374 

structure of lavas 25, 592-593 

Rhone glacier 25, 491 

table of Old Red Sandstone at Caithness 27, 372 

— elected Correspondent 21, 4 

— , Interpretation of Orcadian deposits by 27, 375 



108 J. STANLEY-BROWN INDEX TO VOLUMES 21 TO 3O 

Page 
Geikie, Abchibaij), Reference to geology' of central and western Fife and 

Klnross-shlre by 27, 380 

"The geology of eastern Fife" by 2T, 332 

Lord Kelvin's work by 28,810 

**0n the Old Red Sandstone of western Europe" of 27, 349, 371 

"Text-book of geology" and "Geology of East Fife" by 27, 370 

Geikie, James, cited on schist 28, 457 

spheroidal structure 25, 610 

— ; Great Ice Age, Reference to 24, 563 

— quoted on the Great Lakes 23, 478 

GEnnTZ, H. B., cited on South American fossils 29, 609 

Gei^bal business of Pacific Coast Section of Paleontologlcal Society . . 27, 168 

— conditions of the petroleum Industry and the world's future supply; 

R. Arnold 28, 156, 603 

— stratigraphic break between Pennsylvanian and Permian in western 

America ; Willis T. Lee 28, 169 

Generic nomenclature of the ProboscidiP ; W. D. Matthew 29, 141 

Genesee shale, Stratigraphic relationships of 28, 945 

— Valley and its bearing on the Tertiary drainage problem of eastern 

New York, Glacial erosion in the 24, 76, 718 

Genesis of glauconlte ; C. Palmer 26, 91 

Missouri lead and zinc deposits ; W. A. Tarr 29, 86 

Genetic classification of active volcanoes ;' T. A. Jagger, Jr 21, 23, 768 

Genth, F. a., cited on allanlte 28, 471 

Genus Edestus, Remarkable specimen belonging to the 23, 87, 212 

— (new) , Plesiosaurlan .* 24, 120 

Geographic board (United States), Wasatch Mountains defined by... 21,518 

— cycle In an arid climate: should Its development be by wind or 

water? ; Charles R. Keyes 23, 49, 537-562 

— descriptions of army cantonments and of I'nited States boundary re- 

gions ; W. R. Campbell 30, 106 

— history of the San Juan Mountains since the close of the Mesozolc 

era ; Wallace W. Atwood and Kirtley F. Mather 27, 38 

"— Rculpture" first honored In this country by the American Social Sci- 
ence Association 26, 80 

Geographical and geological literature of the Andean Republic of South 

America, Bibliography of the 24, 75 

— descriptions. Geological elements in 23, 95 

— studies. The geological nature of certain 23, 111 

— terms. Concealed geological meaning in various • 23, 119 

, Implicit explanations in 23, 102 

Geography Is the geology of today 23, 120 

— , Necessity of explanatory treatment In modern ... * 23, 104 

— , Relation of to geology ; W. M. Davis 23. 93-124 

— , Trend toward explanatory treatment of modern 23, 198 

Geologic age of the Coal Creek batholith and its bearing on some other 

features of the geology of the Colorado Front Range: Hyrum 
Schneider 26, 398 



GEOLOGIC — GEOLOGICAL 1 09 

Page 
Geologic and physiographic influences in the Philippines; W. D. Smith. 28,515 
present climates ; M. Manson SOi 103 

— atlas of the United States, Geographic descriptions in the folios of 

the ; W. M. Davis 22, 66, 736 

— climates, Evolution of 30, 499 

— correlation, Use of fossil plants in 27, 525 

— deposits in relation to Pleistocene man ; C. A. Reeds 26, 109 

— effects of the ice-sheet in New York State. 24, 138 

— formations, southern Colorado and northern New Mexico 23, 583-610 

— history of Central America and the West Indies during Cenozoic time ; 

T. W. Vaughan 29, 615 

the coral-reef tract and comparisons with other coral-reef areas ; 

T. W. Vaughan 25. 41 

— instruction. Cooperation in advanced 30, 94 

— map of Brazil ; J. C. Branner 29, 98 

-. Oklahoma, A progress ; C. N. Gould 21, 29, 777 

the Fort Hall Indian Reservation ; George R. Mansfield 27, 64 

vicinity of Ogden, Utah 21, 535 

— mapping by plane-table 30, 405 

— processes as basis for time estimates 28, 809 

— range and evolution of the more important Pacific Coast echinoids ; 

W., S. W. Kew 29. 164 

— section near Columbia, Missouri 28, 170 

of the Panama Canal Zone; Donald F. MacDonald 24,74,707-711 

— significance and genetic classification of arkose deposits; Donald C. 

Barton 27, 115 

of fossil rock-boring animals ; A. L. Barrows 28, 199, 965 

— structure in western Washington ; C. E. Weaver 26, 135 

— thermometer; Fred. B. Wright 21, 176 

— theory and method. Contributions to 23, 86, 262 

— time as measured by uranium minerals 28, 892 

, New table of 28, 884 

, Rhythms and the measurements of 28, 745 

— tour of western Nebraska ; H. F. Osbom 28, 197 

— work of ants 21, 493, 494 

in tropical countries ; J. C. Branner 21, 449-496, 790 

Geological and geographical literature of the Andean Republic of South 

America, Bibliography of the 24, 75 

— Congress ( International ) , Report of delegates to 22, 62 

— descriptions, Empirical and explanatory 23, 104 

" in geological publications," Reference to 23, 93 

— education for engineers -. 28, 137 

of engineers discussed by W. W. Atwood 28, 138 

C. P. Berkey 28,138 

C. W. Brown 28,138 

W. O. Hotchkiss 28,138 

A. C. Lane 28,138 

W. D. Matthew 28,138 



110 J. STANLEY-BROWN INDEX TO VOLUMES 21 TO 30 

Page 

Geological education of enjdneers discussed l)y E. W. Shaw 28, 138 

J. B. Tyrell 28,138 

J. B. Woodwortli 28,138 

— elements in geograpliical descriptions, Limitations of 23» 109 

— light from the Catsklll Aqueduct ; Charles P. Berkey 24. 74, 711 

— matter in geological descriptions. The diminution of apparently 23,112 

— nomenckiture, ReiK)rt of Committee on 21, 29 ; 24, 49 

— pertinence of explanatory phrases 23, 99 

— reconnaissam'e in northwestern Nicaragua ; Oscar H. Hershey 23, 36, 

75, 493-516 
of Porto Rico ; C. P. Berkey \ 26, 113, 156 

— relations between the Cretaceous and Tertiary of southern California ; 

C. A. Waring 25, 152 

— section along the Yukon-Alaska boundary between the Yukon and Por- 

cupine rivers ; D. D. Caimes 24, 52, 678 

Yukon and Porcupine rivers ; D. D. Cairnes 25, 179 

of a portion of the coast ranges in the eastern part of San Luis 

Obispo County, California ; Bruce Martin 24, 93 

— Society of America, Final organization of 21, 746 

, Names of original members of 21, 746 

,Offlcers of 21,2; 22,2; 23,2; 24,8; 

25, 5 ; 26, 11 ; 27* 11 ; 28, 12 ; 29, 11 ; 30, H 

^ Person eligible at organizing of 21» 746 

, Supplementary note on the organization of the 21, 741 

liondon, Reference to 21, 29 

Washington, Entertainment to the various societies given by.. 23,49 

" — song book," compiled by A. C. Lane 21, 28 

— suggestions (extempore) ; B. K. Emerson 21, 22, 766 

— theories. Bearing of recent climatic investigations on 24, 70, 687 

— transformations of phosphorus ; Eliot Blackwelder 27, 47 

Geologists of America, Circular letter to 21, 741 

Geology and geography separate sciences 23, 122 

public service ; G. O. Smith 28, 127 

stratigraphy of the area of Paleozoic rocks in the vicinity of Hud- 
son and James bays ; T. E. Savage and F. M. Van Tuyl 30, 339 

— as a basis of citizenship ; J. E. Pogue 30, 77 

synthetic science ; W. D. Smith 30, 77 

— Committee of National Research Council, Report of 29, 69 

— , Historical notes on the rise of our lacustrine 23, 477 

— in the Students' Army Training Corps ; H. E. Gregory 30, 81 

world war and after; Presidential address by Whitman Cross. 30, 165 

— of Lau Islands, Fiji ; W. G. Foye 28, 166 

" Nahant,'* Reference to the ; A. C. Lane 21, 600 

New York State, Pleistocene 24, 133 

petroleum, Symiwsium on the 28, 603-735 

portions of western Washington ; C. E. Weaver 26, 397 

the area of Paleozoic rocks in the vicinity of Hudson and James 

bays, Canada ; T. B. Savage and F. M. Van Tuji. 1 28, 171 



GEOLOGY — GIGANTIC 111 

Page 
Geology of the Diamond Hill -Cumberland district in Rliode Island- 
Massachusetts ; C. H. Warren and S. Powers 25. 75, 435 

Lake Iditarod region, Alaska ; Philip S. Smith 27, 114 

Nevada hills ; A. C. Lawson 23, 74 

San Jos6 and Mount Hamilton quadrangles; E. C. Templeton.. 24.96 

southern end of the San Joaquin Valley ; G. C. Gpster 25. 123 

Uinta formation ; G. Douglass 25, 144, 417 

Wabana iron ore of Newfoundland ; A. O. Hayes 25, 74 

Wasatch Mountains; Eliot Black welder 21,22,517-542,767 

— , Paper on glacial and physiographic 21, 25-27 

— t Papers on phj'sical and structural 21, 22-25 

— , Pleistocene and post-Pliocene of Maine 28, 167 

— , Relation of geography to ; W. M. Davis 28, 93-134 

Geology's influence on development of oil 28, 625 

Geometbic plans of the earth, with special reference to the planetesimal 

hypothesis ; Harry Fielding Reid 28, 124 

Geometry of faults, Additional note on the ; H. F. Reid 21, 737-740 

Geophysical Laboratory of the Carnegie Institute, Visit of members to. 23,46 

, Plan on which is organized the 21, 142, 143 

Gboboia, Geological work in 25, 173 

Geosynclines, Migration of 30, S7 

Geotectonig adaptation through retardation of the earth's rotation ; 

C. R. Keyes 30, 87 

Geothebmal data of the United States ; Nelson Horatio Darton. . . . 24, 51, 677 

Gebland, G., cited on island subsidence 29, 571 

Germany, Petroleum supply of 28, 612 

— , Pillow lavas in 25, 595 

Gesner, a., cited on oil industry 28, 621 

Gesteb, G. C, Geological section of California coast ranges discussed by 24, 93 

— ; Geology of a portion of the McKlttrick oil field 26, 169 

the sbuthern end of the San Joaquin Valley 25. 123 

— , Tertiary and Pleistocene formations of the north coast of Peru, South 

America 29, 165 

GEm'SBUBG, Pennsylvania, Triassic igneous rocks near 27, 55, 623 

Ge^'SER reservoirs. Temperature of underground 22, 116 

"Giant ripples'* as indicators of paleogeography ; W. H. Bucher 28, 161 

Gibson, M. A., cited on Lamville River bridge, Vermont 21, 321 

Gibson, T. W., cited on Ontario oil fields 28, 723 

Gidley, J. W., cited on Fort Union fauna . . . : 25, 389 

— , Discussion of fossil vertebrate localities of Florida by 26, 154 

Multituberculata by 25, 140 

the affinities of the Multituberculata by 26, 152 

— , Fauna of the Cumberland Pleistocene cave deposit 25, 142 

— ; Perissodactyle 23, 85, 179 

— . Remarks on monodactylous horse by 27, 152 

policy of Vertebrate Section by 27, 153 

skeleton of Canis dirua by 27, 153 

Gioantic Megatherium from Florida ; W. D. Matthew 28, 212 



112 J.STANLEY-BROWN INDEX TO VOLUMES 21 TO 30 

GiGANTOPTEBis Sohenk, Its character and occurrence in America ; David 

White 22, 91 

Gilbert, G. K., Acknowledgment to 21, 339 

— , Algonquin River, Reference to 21, 231, 241 

— cited on Alaska destructive earthquakes 21. 397 

Alaskan earthquake of 1809 21, 368 

Cretaceous strata of Arkansas River 28, 832, 833 

date Alaskan earthquake 21, 341 

dry shores of Lake Bonneville 27. 176 

glaclation in Alaska 21, 725 

Iroquois shore 27, 242 

irregular distribution of density 26, 184 

Lake Bonneville. . . ; 21, 648 ; 28. 352, 354, 357, 360, 368, 371 

land subsidence 26, 60 

measurements of geologic time 28, 747 

mechanical analyses of sediments 28, 927 

old shorelines of Lake Ontario and in the Ontario basin 21, 242 

origin of desert ranges 21, 544, 549 

physiography of the Wasatch region 21, 519, 541 

recession of Niagara Falls 21, 441, 443 

San Francisco earthquake of 1906 21, 405 

the history of the Niagara River 21, 241 

Whirlpool-Saint Davids Valley 21, 434 

transportation of debris by water 29, 185 

washing of sediments 25, 730, 755-756 

water distribution of debris' * 28. 758 

— elected councilor of Cordilleran Section 21, 790 

— , Memoir of Edwin B. Howell by 23, 30 

— ; Monograph I, United States Geological Survey, 1880. Reference to. 22, 165 

— , Nature of Cataract glacier lakes first announced by 24, 154 

— ; Post-glacial joints. Reference to , ; 22, 153 

— , President, Absent by Illness 21, 1 

, Communication from 21, 27 

— , Quotation from, on Alaskan earthquake of 1899 21, 374 

— quoted on origin of the Great Lakes basin 28, 478 

— , Reference to "Contributions to history of Lake Bonneville*' 21, 228 

Niagara Falls pictured by 25, 36 

GiiAEBT Gulf beaches 25, 237 

Giles, A. W., cited on allanite. . : 28, 486 

— , Reference to war work of 30, 180 

GiLKiNET, A., cited on Tertiary floras of Straits of Magellan 29, 633 

Gill, a. C. ; Discussion on some mineral relations from the laboratory 

viewpoint 21, 32 

GiLMEB, F. W., Coastal Plain ideology by 25, 160 

GiLMOBE, C. W., cited on dinosaurs of post-Morrison formation 26, 346 

— , Discussion on fossil mammals by 28, 210 

— ; Remarkable skeleton of Stegosaurus 23, 87 

— ; Remark^ on Tyrannosaurus by 27, 151 



GIRARDEAU — GLACIAL 113 

Page 
GiRABDEAU, Edgewood, Essex, and Sexton Creek limestones, Alexandrian 

series in Missouri and Illinois 24, 357-372 

— limestone and Edgewood formation. Fauna of 21, 76 

GiBTY, G. H., cited on Devonian age of the Bedford shale of Ohio 27, 483 

fauna of Amsden formation 29, 310 

faunas of Thaynes group 27, 283 

fossils from New Mexico 30, 490 

Kaibab limestone 30, 492 

limestone of Wasatch region of Misslssippiau age 21, 528 

New Mexican Brachiopoda 28, 690 

— , Collection of fossil fishes from the Caney shales by 24, 119 

— , Fossils of Wasatch region identified by 21, 530 

— quoted on Caney shales of Oklahoma 21, 457 

— , Reference to faunal list of the Corry sandstone formation published 

by 26, 210 

his "Monograph on the Yellowstone National Park" 24, 234 

— and Stanton, T. W., cited on fossils of the Carboniferous beds of the 

Wasatch region 21, 519 

Glacial and physiographic geology. Papers on 21, 25-27 

Section, Meeting of 22, 64 

— beaches about I^ake 5f ichigan , 29, 235 

— cirques near Mount Washington; James Walter Goldthwait 24,51,677 

— climate, Extent of ice scoring in a 23, 541 

— dam in the Allegheny River, Pennsylvania 25, 215 

— deltas 25, 241 

, terraces, and detritus of the Connecticut Valley '. . 25, 226-229 * 

— (some) deposits east of Cody, Wyoming, and their relation to the 

pleistocene erosional history of the Rocky Mountain region ; Wil- 
liam J. Sinclair 23, 45, 731 

in the Don Valley 25, 71 

of Don River 25, 205 

the continental type in Alaska ; R. S. Tarr and Lawrence Martin 

23. 44, 729 

— (pre) drainage of central western New^ York 21, 31 

— drift in the region of Glacier Park, Montana, Pre- Wisconsin 23,44, 

687-708 ; 24, 71, 529-572 
on Magdalen Islands 25, 84 

— epoch in Iceland, Conditions during 21, 718 

, Notes on a new method of calculating the date of the ; Rufus M. 

Bagg, Jr 22, 66, 735 

— epochs in the San Juan Mountains of Colorado, Evidence of three dis- 

tinct 23, 46, 732 

— erosion. Features of Iceland Valley 21, 719-723 

in Montana , 25, 86 

the Genesee Valley system and its bearing on the Tertiary drain- 
age problem of eastern New York ; A. W. Grabau 24, 76, 718 

near the margin of the continental glacier in central Illinois, Some 

peculiarities of ; John L. Rich 26, 70 

VIII — Bull. Geol. 8oc. Am. 



114 J. STANLEY-BROWN INDEX TO VOLUMES 21 TO 30 

Page 
Glacial erosion, Some hanging valleys no evidence of 23i 485 

— excavation, Hanging valleys no proof of 23, 484 

— features of Carrol district • 27, 283 

— formations in the western United States ; F. Leverett 28, 143 

discussed by W. W. Atwood 28, 144 

G. F. Wright 28,144 

— geology of Maine 28, 309 

— hypothesis as to origin of Lake Bonneville 28, 370 

— Ice-dam in Allegheny River 26, 84 

— investigations in Minnesota in 1911 ; Frank Leverett 23, 46, 732 

the Lake Superior region in 1909; Frank Leverett 21, 21, 762 

— Lake Agassiz, Birds Hill esker and 21, 408, 413, 415, 421, 424 

Missoula ; R. W. Stone 25, 87 

plains in New England 30, 631 

succession. New York State 24, 155-157 

(New York ) , Warrensburgh 22, 185 

— lakes and channels near Syracuse ; T. C. Hopkins 21, 21, 761 

other glacial features of the central Adirondacks; Harold L. 

Ailing 27, 65, 645 

in the Oberlin quadrangle, Ohio, Shorelines of the 21, 21, 762 

of New York State, Beach ridges, deltas, delta sand and clay 

plains. Constructional work of 24, 152, 153 

, Definition of 24, 151 

, Morainal finger, cataract, and complex origin of. 24,151-155 

, Occurrence, erosional, and constructional work of. 24, 151-153 

, Table of drainage provinces 24, 158 

Saginaw Basin In relation to uplift ; F. Leverett 29, 75 

, Origin of 27, 652 

— literature. Bibliography of 29, 229 

— lobe. The Mohawk 22, 64, 183, 725 

— marine submergence of Lon.i? Island 28, 279 

— meanders, ox-bows, and kettles in the Connecticut Valley 25, 232 

— period, C'onnection between changes of climate and 25, 556 

, Relationship of Niagara River to the 21, 26, 433-440, 763 

, Various hypotheses as to causes of the 25, 565-577 

— periods, Reference by A. P. Coleman to 27, 183 

— sand type. Description of 21, 628 

— slate of Massachusetts 28, 152 

— slates of Per^nocarboniferous age. Banded 27, 110 

— streams of New York State, Erosional and constructional 24, 147-151 

— temperatures. Reference to 25, 537 

— time, New York State 24, 161 

' — topography, Glade Run terrace, Pennsylvania 25, 215 

— waters of New York State, Normal, subglacial, and marginal drainage 

work of 24, 147-148 

, Streams : erosional work of 24, 147 

Glaciated stones. Criteria of 23, 458 

— valleys. Limit of altitude in Colorado of 21, 673 



GLACIATION — GLACIERS 115 

Page 

GiJkciATiON and land distribution, Chart of 26, 586 

stormy period of the fourteenth century ; Ellsworth Huntington . . 27, 67 

— , Bibliography of 28, 551 

— , Evidences of 30, 552 

— , Existing glaciers and Wisconsin 23, 687 

— , Iceland group of mountains 21, 718 

— in Alaska 29, 149 ; 30, 115 

Argentina 25, 31 

Brazil 25, 31 

Colorado, Early Tertiary 25, 31 

Montana and Idaho 23, 517-518 

, Wisconsin stage of 24, 535 

New York, Closing phase of 23, 47, 737 

State, Multiple 24, 134 

northwestern Alaska ; Philip S. Smith 23, 44, 563-570 

Ohio, Evidence of very early ; Geprge D. Hubbard 24, 71, 696 

the northern coast ranges of California 25, 120 

upland surface of Iceland, Signs of 21, 724 

uplands of the coast range, Alaska, Observations in 21, 725 

White Mountains 27, 67 

White Mountains, Adirondacks and Catskill 28, 133, 136, 543 

of New Hampshire ; James W. Goldthwait 27, 263 

— of Mount Ranier, Level of maximum precipitation as a factor in the 

24, 72, 707 
the Permian period 25, 578-588 

— on Mount Katahdin, Evidence of continental 26, 78 

— , Possible intermediate stage of Cordilleran 24, 566 

— related to Bethlehem moraine 27, 264 

Glacier action in Iceland, Some effects of; Fred. E. Wright. . . 21, 20, 717-730 
— , Antarctica Beardmore 24, 136 

— Bay, Submarine topography in 25, 88 

— , Comparison and extent of Two Medicine 24, 542 

— , Features resulting from the action of a single valley 21, 720 

— in central Illinois, Glacial erosion near continental 26, 70 

— junction basins, Characteristics of 21, 721 

, Typical 21, 722 

spurs, Characteristics of 21, 721 

, 'Typical 21, 722 

— Park, Montana, Pre- Wisconsin, Glacial drift in the region of 23, 44, 

687-708 ; 24, 71, .529-572 

— , Recent changes in the Asulkan 24, 71, 696 

— , Report of advance of Taku "^ 21, 371 

— , Reports of recession of Muir 21, 368 

— valleys in north Iceland, Features exhibited in 21, 720 

Glaciers, Features developed at junction of tributary and trunk 21, 721 

— (two) in Alaska ; Lawrence Martin 22, 66, 731 

Green Mountains of Vermont 28, 134 



116 J.STANLEY-BROWN INDEX TO VOLUMES 21 TO 30 

rage 

Glaciers in southern Alberta, Relation of Keewatin ice-sheet to drift of 

the mountain 24, 555 

— , Oscillation of Alaskan 21, 20, 758 

— , Tidewater of, Prince William Sound and Kenai peninsula, Alaska... 

21, 20, 757 
Glaciolooy and Physiography Section, Scientific papers relating to. . 21,20-22 

Glass-makino processes, Significance of 29, 102 

Glauconite, Genesis of 26, 91 

— in dolomite and limestone of Missouri ; W. A. Tarr 29, 104 

Gleditscu, E., cited on radium 28. 843 

Glenn, L. C. ; Arkansas diamond-bearing peridotlte area 23, 37, 726 

— , Geological work in Tennessee of 25, 168 

— ; Pennsylvanlan of Tennessee 27, 70 

Glenn FALLS-Saratoga-ScheriectJidy Section, Pleistocene features of... 27,65 

Flossina nehra^kensis, Fossil of Wasatch region 21, 530 

Gneiss province, British East Africa 23, 302 

Gneisses of New Jersey, Mode of formation of 25, 44 

Godwin- Austen, II. II., cited on Old Red Sandstone 27, 349 

Gold "strike" at the Cresson mine, Cripple Creek, Colorado, Recent re- 
markable; n. B. Patton 26,84 

— telluride ore. Cripple Creek, Colorado 26, 84 

Goldman, M. I., cited on chemical and organic deposits of the sea 28, 933 

mechanical analyses of sediments 28, 927 

sea deposits 28,938,940 

sediments 28. 741 

— , Photographs by 29, 438 

— ; Pleistocene deposits in the Sun RiA'er region, Montana 28, 149 

Goldschmidt, V. M., cited on metamorphism 28, 407 

stratigraphy of Biri limestone, Norway 27, 570 

— and Wright, F. E., cited on abrasive action of sand-laden winds... 26,279 

GoLDTHWAiT, J. W., cited on beaches in Michigan Valley 27. 239 

maps of IMelstoceue 27, 253, 254 

marine levels of Saint Lawrence Valley 29, 216 

post- Algonquin deformation of Great Lakes 27, 236 

Presidential Range 28, 543 

sand plains 29,209 

the altitude of the Algonquin beach 21, 241 

— , Correlation of the raised beaclies on the west side of Lake Michigan, 

Reference to 21, 233 

— , Deformation of the Algonquin beach discussed by 24, 71, 607 

— , Discussion of coastal subsidence by 26, 62 

date of local glaclatlon In White Mountains, Adlrondacks and 

CatsklU by 28. 133, 136 

submergence of Connecticut and Hudson valleys 25, 64 

— electe<l Fellow 21, 3 

— ; Evidences for and against the former existence of local glaciers in 

the Green Mountains of Vermont 28, 134 

— ; Glacial cirques near Mount W^ashlngton 24, 51, 677 ; 27, 290 



GOLDTH WAIT GOULD 1 17 

Page 
GoLDTHWAiT, J. W. ; Glaclation in the White Mountains of New Hamp- 
shire 27, 263 

— ; Isobases of the Algonquin and Iroquois beaches and their significance 

21, 21. 227-248, 761 

— , J. W. Merritt Introduced by 25, 75 

— ; Occurrence of glacial drift on the Magdalen Islands ' 26, 84 

— ; Snow arch in Tuckerman Ravine on Mount Washington 28, 144 

— ; Studies of glaclation in the White Mountains of New Hampshire. . . 27, 67 
— ; The twenty -foot terrace and sea -cliff of the lower Saint Lawrence. . 

22, 64. 723 

GoLUBiATNiKOFF, D., Cited on oil sands. 28, 596 

GoNiocERAS. Vertical range of 27, 482 

GoNZAGO DE Campos. I#. F., successor to Derby as director of Brazilian 

Survey 27, 20 

GoocH, F. A., and Goodbich, J. E. ; Analyses of waters of Yellowstone 

National Park, Reference to 22, 114 

Goocii, L. D., Analyses of allanite by 28, 479 

GooDCHiL^, J. G., cited on continental deposits 28, 742 

duration of Glacial period 28, 812 

geologic climates 30, 553 

Lanarkian rocks 27, 362 

measurement of geologic time 28, 754. 823 

Old Red Sandstone 27, 39, 349-353, 380 

origin of the Torredon, Old Red and New Red Sandstones of 

Great Britain 21, 653 

sand deposits ; 21, 642 

the origin of hematite 21, 646 

weathering of eruptive rocks and limestones 21, 631, 633 

— , Reference to his "Desert conditions in Britain" 21, 642, 652 

- — **The older Deutozoic rocks of North Britain" by 27,350,362,380 

GooDE, G. B., Reference to writings of 26, 159 

GooDSPEED, G. E., Jr., cited on pre-Cambrian gabbro 26, 450 

Gordon, C. E. ; Some structural features in the Green Mountain belt of 

rocks 27, 101 

Gordon, C. H., cited on classification of metamorphic rocks 28, 452, 

456, 459, 462 

— , Geological work in Tennessee of 26, 168 

— ; Onyx deposits in east Tennessee 23, 37j 729 

Gordon, Wallace, Occurrence of a marine Middle Tertiary fauna on the 

western border of the Mojave Desert area 29, 162 

Gorge of the Hudson, Further light on ; James F. Kemp 21, 21, 760 

GoTHAN, W., cited on Jurassic woods SO, 520 

GrOULD, C. N., cited on the Oklahoma natural bridge 21, 327 

— ; Maps showing location of present and former channel of the Washita 

River, Oklahoma 21, 320 

— ; Progress geologic map of Oklahoma 21, 29, 777 

— quoted on channels of the Washita River, Oklahoma 21, 320 



118 J. STANLEY-BROWN INDEX TO VOLUMES 21 TO 30 

Page 
GouU), C. N. ; Relation of structure to the production of oil and natural 

gas in the mid-continental field 28, 158 

— , Secretary (after first four papers) Stratigraphic and Paleontologic 

Section 21, 30 

GoYAz, Geology of 30, 251 

Grabau, a. W., Alpheus Hyatt and bis principles of research discussed 

by 24. 105 

— ; Ancient delta deposits 23, 48, 743 

— , The Cataract discussed by 24, 107 

— cited on article on Upper Siluric strata 27, 72-73, 75-77 

beach cusps 21, 604 

disconforniity 28, 794 

Eurypterids ; 27, 395 

Medina fauna 25, 281, 285, 286 

Medina formation 26, 302 

Medinan deposits in New York and Pennsylvania 27, 464 

Niagara Gorge section 26, 308 

Old Red Sandstone ^87, 40, 352 

origin of pillow lavas 26, 639 

ostracoderms 17, 388 

pillow structure .' 26, 635 

principles of stratigraphy 26. 231 

Queenston 26, 287 

sedimentary overlap 30, 467 

the Shawangunk in Ulster County 27, 533, 535 

Silurian formation in New Jersey 27, 543, 545-547, 552 

sandrock, the Sylvania, of Lake Erie 21, 625 

types of sedimentary overlap 21, 652 

unconformity of Oneida conglomerate 29, 355 

— ; Classification of marine deposits 24, 74, 711 

the Tetraseptata, with some remarks on parallelism in develop- 
ment in this group: a study in orthogenesis 27, 148 

— , Coastal marshes south of Cape Cod discussed by 23, 50, 743 

— ; Comparison of American and European Lower Ordovlcic formations 

27,555 

European and American early Paleozoic formations 27, 159 

the European and American Siluric 28, 129 

— ;.Conditions of deposition of some Tertiary petroliferous sediments. 30,103 
— .Correlation problems of Eastport quadrangle, Maine, discussed by.. 24,52 
— ; Devonic black shale of Michigan, Ohio, Canada, and western New 

York interpreted as a Paleozoic delta deposit 26, 137 

— , Discussion of Alexandrian rocks by 95, 155 

coastal subsidence by 26, 61 

corals by 28, 208 

fossil ripple-marks by 28, 162 

Ordovician limestone of Pennsylvania by 2g, 167 

Paleozoic stratigraphy about Three Forks, Montana, by 26,157 

Permo-Carboniferous beds of Texas 26, 41 



GRABAU GRABAU 119 

Page 

G&ABAU, A. W., Discussion of phylogeny of crinoids by 26, 135 

Red Beds by 26,61 

reef corals by 28, 200 

Shawangunk formation of Medina age by 26, 150 

Silurian system of Ontario by 26, 41 

Tennessee shale by 28, 207 

Upper Cayugan of Maryland by 21, 30, 781 

waterlimes 28, 174 

on Ordovicic-Siluric section of the Mingan and Anticosti islands 

by 21, 75 

post-Tertiary history of the lakes of Asia Minor and Syria by. . 21, 20 

salt marsh formation near Boston by 21, 29 

the geology of the Wasatch Mountains by 21, 22 

— ; Distribution and migration of American Middle and Upper Devo- 
nian corals '. 27, 147 

— ; Early Paleozoic deposits of North America 24, 400-528 

— , Experimental geology discussed by 24, 49, 672 

— ; Fossiliferous conglomerate ., 23, 83 

— , Fossils of the Cataract formation described by 26, 289 

— , Glacial erosion in the Genesee Valley system and its bearing on the 

Tertiary drainage problem of eastern New York 24, 76, 718 

— , F. F. Hahn introduced by •. 23, 83 

— ; Hamilton group of western New York 26, 113, 158 

— ; Inclusion of the Pleistocene period in the paychozoic era 30, 149 

— , Intracolonial acceleration and retardation and its bearing on si)ecies 21, 76 

— , Introduction of S. H. Knight by 27, 120 ; 28, 168 

Mrs. Eula D. McBwan by '. . . . 28, 201 

— ; Isolation as a factor in the development of the Paleozoic faunas. . 29, 143 

— , Medina of Ontario discussed by 23, 83 

— ; Migration of geosynclines 30, 87 

— ; New genera of corals of the family of Cyathophyllodae 28, 199 

— , New Trenton Crinoid from Ontario discussed by 23, 84 

— ; North American continent in Upper Devoulc time 26, 88 

— ; Notes on Devonic corals 23, 87 

— ;01entangy shales of central Ohio and its stratigraphic significance.. 

26. 112, 156 

— ; Origin of salt deposits, etcetera, quotations from 24, 496 

— , Ozarkian fauna discussed by 23, 84 

— ; Paleontological notes: I. Polyphyletlc genera; 2. An illustration of 

Waagen*s theory of mutations 24, 109 

— , Paleontology of a voracious appetite discussed by 23, 83 

— ; Pre-Glacial drainage of central western New York 21, 31 

— ; Prevailing stratigrapliic relationships of the bedded phosphate de- 
posits of Europe, North Africa, and North America 30, 104 

— ; Problems of the interpretation of sedimentary rocks 28, 162, 206, 735 

— quoted on the Devonian reefs of Wisconsin and New York 22, 247 

— , Reference to "Early Paleozoic delta deposits of North America" by. . 

27, 395, 578 



120 J. STANLEY-BROWN — INDEX TO VOLUMES 21 TO 30 

Grabau, a. W., Reference to Louis Agassiz of importance of coralline 

algffi by , 26, 60 

"Principles ot Stratigraphy" by 27,388 

— ; Relation of the Holocboanltes and the Orthocboanites to the Pro to- 

cboanites and the significance of the Bactritidie 30, 148 

oil-bearing to the oil-producing formations in the Paleozoic of 

North America 29, d2 

— t Remarks on "mutations" by 27, 148 

Nagelfluh of Salzburg by ^ 26,61 

— , Rei)ort on nomenclature of faults discussed by 24, 49 

— requested to give two papers listed under the Paleontological Society's 

program 26, 112 

— , Shinarump conglomerate discussed by 24, 52, 679 

— ; Significance of the Sherburne sandstone in Upper Devonic stratig- 
raphy 29, 127 ; 30, 423 

— , Joseph 11. Sinclair introduced by 27, 85 

— ; Some new paleogeographic maps of North America 25, 136 

— , Speculative nature of geologj' discussed by 24, 70 

— ; Stratigraphic relationships of the Tully limestone and the Genesee 

shale in eastern North America 28, 207, 045 

— ; Structure of the Helderberg Front 23, 50, 746 

— ; Subdivisions of the Traverse group of Michigan and its relation to 

other mid-Devonic formations > . . 27, 159 

— suggests replacement of "Gray Band" by Thoroid sandstone 25, 297 

— ; Systematic rank of mutations and submutations in orthogenetic se- 
ries among the invertebrates 27, 148 

— , Unconformity at the base of the Berea sandstone In Ohio discussed 

by 26, 96, 155 

— and O'CoNNELL, Mabjorie; Were the graptollte shales, as a rule, 

deep- or shallow-water deposits? 28, 205, 959 

Shebzeb, WiixiAM H., Reference to treaty on Monroe formation 

prepared by 21, 650 

Gbafen, H., cited on South American fossils 29, 609 

Grafton quartzite 25, 441 

Grand Canyon of the Colorado River ; N. H. Darton 23, 36, 721 

Granger, Walter, cited on discovery of specimens of Notharctus in the 

Middle Eocene of Wyoming 26, 421 

OJo Alamo beds 25,379 

Paleocene vertebrate fauna 25, 382 

Torrejon fauna 25, 401 

— , Discussion of Sauroix>d dinosaurs by 26, 153 

— ; Eocene faunal horizons of the northern San Juan basin In New Mex- 
ico 28, 216 

— ; New evidence of the affinities of the Multituberculata 26, 152 

Tilladont skull from the Huerfano basin, Colorado 29, 147 

— ; Skeleton of Diatryma, a gigantic bird of the Lower Eocene 28, 212 

— ; Stratigraphy and faunal horizons of the Huerfano basin 28, 216 

— and Matthew, W. D. ; Fossil mammals of the Tiffany beds 29, 152 



GRANGER — GREAT 121 

Page 
Gbanger, Walter, and Sinclair, William J. ; Eocene and OUgocene of 

Wind River and Big Horn basins 22, 63, 722 

; The Lainbdotherium zone In the Big Horn basin, Wyoming. . . 22, 95 

Granger, W. K. ; Notes on the Eocene of the Big Horn basin of Wyo- 
ming 24. 113 

Granite and iimestone contacts, Bleaching of 21, 33, 786 

— felsophyre in Virginia, Megascopic and microscopic character and 

chemical composition and classification of 24, 309, 310 

, Name applied to rocks at South Veta peak 21, 665 

— , Intrusion of Precarabrian. 27, 104 

— , Occurrence of Laurentiau 21, 686 

— of Quincy, Massachusetts, Pegmatite in 21, 33, 784 

Rockport, Massachusetts, Fayalite in 21, 33, 787 

— , Reference by Watson and Cllne to 27, 223 

Granites, Analyses of 25, 466 

— and metacrystals by selective solution — a recantation, Origin of. 24,73,704 

Grant, C. C, Acknowledgments to 26, 278 

Grant, U. S., cited on ellipsoidal greenstones 25, 619 

— , Member of Auditing Committee 25, 49 

— ; Tidewater glaciers of Prince William Sound and Kenai peninsula, 

Alaska 21, 20, 757 

Grants Mill granite of Diamond Hill-Cumberland district 25, 458 

Granularity limits in i>etrographic-microscopic work; Fred. E. Wright. 

23, 37, 726 

Grapevine range. Tilted tertiaries of the. Figure showing 21, 552 

Graphic method of representing the chemical relations of a petrographic 

province 25, 43 

— presentation of- bedded deix)8its 27, 122 

Graphite deposits of Alabama . .- 30, 112 

Graptoute-bearino shales 28, 205 

— shales. Origin of 28, 959 

— zones of the Utica shale ; H. Ruedemann 28, 206 

Graftoutes, The stratigrnphic significance of; Rudolf Ruedemann 22,93,231 

Grassy Creek shale. Invertebrate fauna of 29, 95 

Graton, Louis C, Discussion of anorthosites by 28, 155 

Gravel and sand beds of Iowa and Nebraska, Evidence fossil if erous, are 

Aftonian 21, 31 

— boulders of limestone. Flattening of 25, 66 

— , Dawson and McConnell Saskatchewan 24, 550, 558 

Gravigrade edentates in later Tertiary deposits of North America; 

Chester Stock 29, 161 

Gravity anomalies and geological formations ; William Bowie 23, 50 

Great Barrington and Richmond boulder trains; F. B. Taylor.... 21,747-752 

boulder trains. Location and characteristics of 21, 749-751 

train, Probable history of boulders of the 21, 751 

-- Basin, Basin range faulting in the 26, 138 

Qreat Basin, Later deformations in certain ranges of the 25, 122 

provinces, Hipparion-Wke horses of .* 27, 171 



122 .J. STANLEY-BROWN INDEX TO VOLUMES 21 TO 30 

Page 

Gbeat BasiD range. Old areb and trough of. Figure showing 21, 553 

ranges. Explanations of origin of 21, 545, 546 

f Folding, faulting, and erosion given as origin of 21, 545 

region. Erosion in 21, 547 

Great Britain, Effect of migrations on population of 24. 284 

, Reference to glacial geology of 25, 214 

— Lake basins in their relationship to the Niagara limestone; J. W. 

Spencer 24, 76, 229 

history -r 25, 35 

region, Terrestrial stability of 27, 79 

— Lakes, Niagara limestone barriers to the 24, 229 

, Outlets of 24. 231, 232 

— Plains and Rocky Mountain Front provinces. Physiographic study of 

the Cretaceous-Eocene period in the 26, 105 

, Dominant characteristics of the 22, 689 

fashioned mainly by eolative processes. Recapitulation showing. 22,713 

features, Eolic significance of certain 22, 703-710 

formations. Authorities supporting the lake hypotheses of 22, 692 

various hypotheses of 22, 692-695 

— Salt Lake, Utah, Oolitic sand of 21, 615 

Green, W. L., cited on Hawaiian Islands 28, 503 

lava flows of 1859 25, 33 

origin of pillow lava 25, 602 

— quoted on Kilauea emanation 24, 574 

Gbeen Mountains, Structural features of 27, 101 

Green Pond conglomerate and Lcmgwood shale, Paleozoic fault block of 

New Jersey and eastern New York 24, 477 

— River formation, Fossil algie from 27, 159 

" — sand,'' Ck)mposition of 21, 644 

Greenbrier limestone, Mi8si8sii)piau delta of Virginia 23, 452 

Greenland and the Arctic archipelago, Figure showing 21, 206 

— , Discussion of uplift in 29, 71 

— , Geology of Parker Snow Bay 29, 98 

— , Great northern horst 21, 205-212 

— rifts, Diagram showing 21, 207 

Greenly, E., cited on pillow lava 25, 602 

Greenville limestone, Alteration proces.ses and i)roducts within the 24, 76, 717 

Greger, D. K. ; Ainsden formation of Wyoming and Its fauna 28, 170 

— ; Devonian of central Missouri ; fauna of the Cooper limestone 28, 209 

— , Introduction by E. B. Branson of 28, 209 

— ; Invertebrate fauna of the Grassy Creek shale of Missouri 29, 95 

— and Branson, E. B. ; Amsden formation of the east sloi)e of the Wind 

River Mountains of Wyoming and its fauna 29, 300 

; Devonian of central Missouri 20, 112, 156 

Gregory, H. E., cited on allanite 28, 469 

australites 27, 53 

sand plains of Naugatuch Valley 25, 238 

spheroidal lavas in Maine 25, 621 



GREGORY — GREGORY 123 

Page 

•Grecsoby, H. E., cited on veins of chalcopyrlte and galena 25t 474 

— ; Cooperation in advanced geologic Instruction 30, 94 

— ; Creology In the Students' Army Training Corps 30, 81 

— , Glacial epochs in the San Juan Mountains of Colorado discussed by . 23, 46 
— ; Preliminary geological map of the Navajo-Mokl reservation... 24,53,680 

— presided at meeting First Division 26, 62 

— , Reference to war work of 30. 177 

— ; Sculpturing of rock in the Colorado Plateau province 26, 393 

— ; Shinarump conglomerate 24, 52, 679 

— ; Some physiographic features of bolsoms 26, 392 

GsiSGOBY, J. W., Chart of historic changes In precipitation prepared by. . 

25, 542-543 

— cited on changes in precipitation 25, 536-537 

climatic changes in Asia 25, 480 

pulsations 25, 532-533 

climate variations 30, 557 

pillow structure 25, 597, 599 

titonotheres 25, 144, 406 

— , Reference to materials assembled by 26, 411 

— , Skeleton of Notharctus, an Eocene lemuroid 25, 141 

Gbeooby, W. II. ; Note on the evolution of the femoral trochanters in 

reptiles and mammals 29, 154 

Gbegobt, W. K., acted as Secretar}*' at morning session, December 30. . 29, 152 

— cited on Connecticut geology • 28, 861 

disconformity between Kaibab and Moenkopi 30, 494 

studies of sauropoda by 30, 383 

— , Discussion of the affinities of the Multituberculata by 26, 152 

on fossil mammals by 28, 210 

— elected on Supervisory Board of American Year Book 30, 146 

— ; Homologies of the borders and surfaces of the Scapulocoracoid in 

reptiles and mammals ' 28, 216 

— ; Homology of the "Aliphenoid" and "Lachrymal" in recent and fossil 

vertebrates 24, 118, 241-246 

— ; Observations on Adapidae and other Lemuroidea 26, 153 

the phylogeny of the higher primates. . : 26, 153 

— ; On the classification and phylogeny of the Lemuroidea 26, 426 

— ; On the relationship of the Eocene lemur Notharctus to the Adapidce 

and to other primates 26, 419-425 

— , Paper of R. L. Moodie presented and discussed by 26, 154 

— ; Phylogenetlc review of extinct and recent anthropods, with special 

reference to the evolution of the human dentition 27, 149 

— ; Preliminary report of the Committee on the Nomenclature of the 

Skull Elements in the Tetrai>oda 27, 152 

— ; Primates, Marsupials, and Insectivores 23, 86, 187 

— ; Relations of the Tupaiidie and of Blocene lemurs, especially No- 
tharctus 24, 117, 247-252 

— , Remarks on origin of sternum by 27, 152 



124 J.STANLEY-BROWN INDEX TO VOLUMES 21 TO 30 

Page 
Gregory, W. K., Secretary of the Committee ; second report of the Com- 
mittee on the Nomenclature of the Cranial Elements in the Per- 
mian Tetrapoda 28, 210, 973 

Gbesb, E. M. ; Critical study of fossil leaves from the Dakota sandstone 29, 131 

Grewink, C, First recorded earthquake of Alaska by 21, 397 

Griffiths, John, cited on Chicago blue clay 29, 243 

Grimsby section, Ontario 25, 310 

Gbimsley, G. p., cited on West Virginia oil field 28, 504 

Griswold, W. T., cited on Ohio oil field , . 28, 570 

Grit, Facial relationships of the Shawangunk 22. 55 

Gbos Ventre slide ; Eliot Black welder 23, 51, 487-491, 739 

Gbound-slot'hs, Megalocnus and other Cuban 26, 152 

— water of northern France 30. 389 

Group of twenty-six associated skeletons of Leptomeryx from the White 

River Oligocene ; E. S. Riggs 25, 145 

^ROUT, F. F. ; Internal structures of igneous rocks 29, 100 

— ; Two-phase convection in igneous magmas 29. 101 

Groa'ER, , cited on atomic weight of lead 28, 849 

Gpubenmann, Ulrich, cited on classification of metamorphic rocks 

28, 452, 457 

metamorphism 28, 384 

Grybowski, J., cited on oil fields 28, 563 

Peru geolo.gy 29, 641 

GuABALUPiAi^ and Kansas sections. Correlation of 21, 76 

Guatemala, Climatic changes in 25, 539 

— , Geology of 29, 617 

Guelph formation of Ontario ; M. Y. Williams 27, 148 

GuELTARD^s miucraloglcal map of Louisiana and C3anada 25, 161 

GCmbel, K. W. von. Reference to work of 28, 738 

GOntheb, a., quoted on the dislocation of Hiddensoe, FrledlRnder 22, 159, 165 

Gulf Coast oil field ; G. D. Harris * 28, 157 

petroleum fields of Mexico between the Tamesi and Tuxpan rivers ; 

I. C. White 24. 73, 253-273. 706 

, Sedimentation along 27, 71 

— Coastal Plain, Upper Cretaceous deposits of 27, 154 

— of Saint Lawrence, Ordovlcic-Silurlc section of the Mingan and Anti- 

costi islands 21, 677-716 

Guluver, F. P., Discussion on post-Tertiiiry history of the lakes of Asia 

Minor and Syria by 21, 20, 755 

— ; Pebbles: Types formed by the sea, rivers, wind, and glaciers 21, 31 

— , Reference to his study of ''Shoreline topography" 24, 188 

"Gumbo," Mechanical analysis of 25, 729 

Gun River formation, Anticosti island 21, 708 

, Correlation of 21, 711-714 

, Fossils of 21, 708-713 

, Location, composition, and thickness of 21, 708 

, Zones and fauna of 21, 708-713 

GuppY, H. B., cited on Hawaiian Islands 28, 504 



GUPPY — HALL 1 25 

Page 

GuppY, H. B., cited on island subsidence 29, 493 

West Indian flora 29,616 

GuTENBEBO, B., citcd on intensity of eartliquake waves 26, 172 

GwiLLiM, J. C, cited on Cache Creelj group of British Columbia 25, 198 

— ; Observations made of Alaskan earthquake of 1899 21, 647 

Gypsum and anhydrite from the Ludwig mine, Lyon County, Nevada; 

Austin F. Rogers 24, 94 

— beds of central New York : 28, 131 

— deposits, H3T)othesi8 for the origin of 26, 223 

of the upper Red Beds of Wyoming 26, 240 

, Origin of thick salt and 26. 103, 231-242 

— sand, Deposit of 21, 647 

— , Variation of the optic angle with temperature of 23, 37, 726 

H 

Hadley, A. T. ; Dana centenary Introductory remarks 24, 55 

— , President Yale University, Meeting of James Dwight Dana centenary 

presided over by 24, 55 

Hagen, , cited on experiments with sand grains 21, 6f2 

Hageb, D., Maps of Kansas oil fields by 28, 692, 701 

Hageb. Lee, cited on structure of oil fields 28, 583 

Hague, Abnold, Annual address of the President 22, 103 

— , Bibliography of 29, 46 

— , chairman Stratigraphic and Paleontologlc Section 21, 30 

— cited on Wasatch region 21, 539 

— : Early Tertiary volcanoes of the Absaroka Range, Reference to 22, 106 

— elected President 21, 2 

— , Memoir of Samuel Franklin Emmons by 23, 12 

— , Memorial of 29, 35 

— on Committee on Correspondentship 23, 35 

— ; Origin of the thermal waters in the Yellowstone National Park. .. 22,103 

— , President-elect, Communication from President Gilbert read by 21,27 

— , Reference to address of retiring President 22, 55 

— ; Response to address of welcome by President 22, 2 

Hahn, , cited on island subsidence 29, 512 

Hahn, F. F., cited on graptolite shales 28, 959-960 

Trenton Falls 28, 325 

— ; Notes on the Dlctyonemas of New Brunswick 23, 83 

Haidingeb, W., cited on metamorphism 28, 383 

Haiti, Geology of 29, 628-619 

Halbebstadt, B., Memorial of Frank A. Hill by 28, 67 

Hale, J. P., cited on oil fields of West Virginia 28, 621 

Halemaumau Crater, Analyses of gases about 24, 595 

Hall, Basil, Reference to Niagara Falls pictures by 26, 36 

— , Survey of Niagara Falls, 1905, by 21, 442 

Hall, C. W. ; Analyses of rocks of the Galena-Trenton series 25, 270 

— , Bibliography of 23, 29 

— cited on graptolite-bearing pre-Niagaran shale 27, 476 



126 J.STANLEY-BROWN INDEX TO VOLUMES 21 TO 30 

Page 

Hall, C. W., Memoir of, by Newton H. Winohell '23, 28 

— ; Red sandstones of southeastern Minnesota 21, 30 

Hali., Jamks, cited on Cataract fauna 25, 281 

Clinton formation 25. 278 

of New York 29,328 

Medina formation 25, 285, 286, 287 

sandstone 25, 299 

section 25, 306 

mud-cracks 29, 479 

Niagara formation 25, 287 

Rochester Siluric section 25, 304 

— , Committee appointed to confer with the Director of the United States 

Geological Survey on motion of 21, 743 

— , Coral specimens examined by 27. 74 

— , Creological w^ork in Texas of 25, 163 

— , Medina fauna described by 25, 288 

— , Reference to Anticosti fossils examined by 21, 678 

survey of the American Falls by . w 25, 36 

work of 29, 174 

— , Survey of Niagara Falls, 1842, by 21. 442 

— and Clarke, J. M. ; An Introduction to the study of Brachlopoda, 

Reference to # 22, 258 

, Reference to the "Genera of Paleozoic Brachiopoda" of 21,498 

Hall, T. S., cited on graptolite horizons 22, 234 

Hall, W. B. ; Some new fossils from the Cambrian of South Attleboro, 

Massachusetts 21, 76 

Halle, J., cited on tillites in Falkland Islands 27, 185 

Halle, T. G., cited on Jurassic flora of Graham Land 29, 645 

Middle Jurassic flora 29, 610-611 

Hallock, William, Temperatures of deep borings of gas wells 24, 276 

underground geyser reserv^oirs proved by 22. 116 

Halogen salts of silver, Occurr€»nce of 21, 791 

Halsey, W. D., cited on Long Island geology 28, 298 

Hamada of the Libyan Desert, Origin of tlie basins within the v . . . 26, 396 

Hamilton, William, cited on Stromboli 28» 267 

Hamilton fauna. Recurrent 21, 287 

— formation of New York 30, 464 

— group of western New York ; A. W. Grabau 26, 113, 158 

— section, Ontario 25, 313 

Hammond, H., Work on cotton reports of 25. 176 

Hamob, W. a., cited on synthesis of hydrocarbons 28, 728 

Handy, F. M. ; R61e of sedimentation in diastrophism and vulcanism. . 26. 138 
Hanging valley of Taughannock Falls 23. 480 

— valleys and their pre-Glacial equivalents in New York ; J. W. Spencer 

23, 47, 477-485 

, Characteristics of 21, 721 

Hann, J., cited on climatic changes 25, 480, 527 

sun-spots* relation to climatic changes 25, 492, 494 



HAN N IB AL HARVARD 127 

Fage 
Hannibal, Harold, cited on Oligocene 29, 303 

Pliocene flora 30» 530 

— , Discussion of Oregon Oligocene by 25, 154 

— ; Stratigraphic and faunal relations of the later Eocene of the Pacific 

coast 26, 168 

— ; Vaqueros of the Santa Monica Monntains of southern California . . 26, 153 

Hanover, Garnetiferous hornblende schist of 26. 75 

— , Pillow lavas in 26, 597 

Hard rock phosphates of Florida, Origin of 24, 75, 716 

Harder, E. C. ; Joint system in the rocks of southwestern Wisconsin and 

its relation to the drainage network, Reference to 22, 143 

— ; Richland center district, Reference to 22, 149 

Hardy, T. S., Engineering work of 26, 171 

Hares, C. J., cited on cannon-ball formation 26, 339 

geology of Indian reservations 26, 350, 351 

Harker, Alfred, cited in discussion of alkaline rocks 21, 88 

on measurements of geologic time 28, 755 

metamorphism 28, 381 

origin of pillow lavas 26, 639 

pillow structure 26, 635 

rate of denudation 28, 823 

schists 28, 457 

— , Natural history of igneous rocks, 1909, Reference to 21, 152 

— , Reference to division of igneous rocks advocated by 21, 114 

Harkness, R. H., Reference to work on joint systems of 22, 167 

Harmer, F. W., cited on geologic climates 30, 556 

Harriman Alaska expedition, Reference to 21, 341, 368 

Harris, G. D., Acknowledgment to 28, 949 

— cited on Louisiana oil 28, 573, 709 

mud lumps 28, 329 

saline domes 28, 578, 580 

salt 29, 475 

— , Dome structures in the rocks of Texas and Louisiana explained by. 24, 254 

— , Geological work in Arkansas of 26, 167 

Louisiana of 26, 173 

— ; Gulf Coast oil field 28, 157 

— , Reference to southern geological work by 26, 163 

Hartnaoel, C. a., cited on Me<lina formation 26, 302 

New York Clinton 29, 328 

Oneida and Medina formations 21, 680 

oolitic iron ore 26, 768 

red shales of High Falls 27, 533 

thickness of sandstone at High Falls 27, 541 

— , Reference to list of Rochester shale fauna prepared by 24, 381 

Hartzell, J. Culver; Conditions of fossillization geology of the Santa 

Lucia range in the Big Sur range 21, 794 

Harvard Museum of Comparative Zoology, The coral island model of 

Borabora, Tahiti, installed in 26, 79 



128 J.STANLEY-BROWN INDEX TO VOLUMES 21 TO 30 

Page 
Harvard University, Sessions held in rooms of department of geology, 

mineralogy, and botany of museum of 21* 1 

, Vote of thanks offered to governing board and to geologists and 

mineralogists of the university and Massachusetts Institute of 

Technology i 21» 34 

Hatch, F. H., cited on Carboniferous conglomerates of Africa 25* 201 

Hatcher, J. B., cited on collection of dinosaur bones in Carnegie Museum 

at Pittsburgh 26, 346 

dinosaurs dei^endent on one peculiar type of habitat 26, 327 

the origin of the Morrison formation 26, 319 

— , Reference to fossils collected by 25, 393 

Hauer, F. von, cited on metamorphism 28, 379 

— and Weiss cited on lithophysje 26, 256 

Hauq, E., cited on Danien stage 26, 321 

metamorphism • 28, 383 

« 

monoclines 27, 91 

the Danien and the Montien 25, 336 

— quoted on extension of last stage of Jurassic system 26, 298 

— , Reference to "Trait6 de G^logie'' of 27. 556 

— and Woodward, H. B., cited on relations of the Jurassic and the Cre- 

taceous in Wiltshire, England 26,298 

Haughton, Samuel, cited on estimates of geologic time 28, 820 

— , Reference to work on Joint systems of 22, 167 

Hawaii lavas and their relations 24, 54, 684 

— , Succession In age of the volcanoes of 23, 747 

— , Trachyte (acid phonolite) of 21, 89 

Hawaiian Islands, Tectonic lines in 27, 109 

the volcano of Kilauea 28,270,501 

— Volcano Research Association, Reference to 24, 582 

— volcanoes ; Reginald A. Daly 21, 22, 767 

Hawes, G. W., Analyses by 27, ©41 

— , Geological work in Florida of 25, 1T5 

Hawkins, A. C, cited on Lockatong sediment. 27, 625 

— , Reference to "liOckatong formation of the Trlassic of New Jersey and 

Pennsylvania" of 27, 625 

— and Brown, C. W. ; Basic rocks of Rhode Island; their correlation 

and relationships 26. 92 

Hawley, H. J., Cretaceous and Tertiary stratigraphy of the western end 

of the Santa Inez Mountains, Santa Barbara County, California 29, 164 
— , Stratigraphy and paleontology of the Salinas and Monterey quad- 
rangles, California 28, 225 

Ha worth, E., cited on ''Kickapoo" limestone 28, 421 

— , Discussion of Paleozoic rocks by .• 28, 171 

Red Beds of Wyoming by 28, 168 

— , Information asked how to distinguish flow-breccias from other tj^pes 

of breccia by 26, 401 

— , Physiographic features of bolsons discussed by 26, 393 

— , Remarks on the Coal Creek batholith by 26, 399 



HAWTHORNE HEBERTELLA 129 

Page 
Hawthorxe, Nathaniel, Reference to Massachusetts natural bridge in 

his American Note Book 21, 327 

Hawveb, J. C, Resolution of condolence on death of 27, 168 

— , Some physical features of Hawver cave 25, 155 

Hawveb cave. Pleistocene mammal fauna of 27, 169 

Hay, O. p., cited on Fort I^nlon fauna 25, 380 

position of Puerco and Torrejon formations 25, 399 

— ; Establishment of faunal divisions among the vertebrates of the 

Pleistocene 23, 87 

— ; Remarkable specimen belonging to the genus Edestus 23, 87, 212 

Hay, Robert, cited on Kansas chert 28, 424 

metamorphlc rocks 28, 419 

Hayden and Kino, Reference to Wasatch region surveys of 21, 518 

Hayes, A. O., Acknowledgments to 29, 220 

— ; Geology of the Wabana iron ore of Newfoundland 25, 74 

Hayes, C. W., Bibliography of 28, 118 

— cited on Appalachian peneplains 29, 576 

-Coastal Plain oil fields / 28,578 

Triasslc rocks near Skolal Pass, Alaska 27, 696 

— , Deposits from aqueous solutions associated with igneous rocks dis- 
cussed by 22, 117 

— , Memorial of 28, 81 

— quoted from his study of the "Nicaraguan depression" 23, 497 

— , Reference to "An expedition through the Yukon district" of 27, 696 

Hayfobd, J. F., cited on determination of geologic time 28, 840 

isostatic equilibrium 27, 190-191 

"The Pratt-IIayf ord hjT)othesls" establishing Isostasy 26, 179 

— , Reference to level of isostatic compensation by 28, 857 

— and Bowie, J. F., cited on topography and isostatic compensation. . 26,181 

Bowie's formula of value of gravity at sealevel 26, 181 

Hayfobdian conception of isostasy. Criticism of 25, 34 

Haywes, W. p., cited on age of Narragansett sertes 25, 448 

pre-Cambrian gabbro 25, 450 

— ; New facts bearing on the Paleozoic stratigraphy of the region about 

Three Forks, Montreal 26, 157 

Haystack Mountain, Connecticut, Occurrence of amphilmlite schist at 21, 751 

Haywabds Rift, Physiographic features of the 25, 123 

Headden, W. p., cited on analyses of Arkansas River water 29, 597 

Doughty Springs of Colorado 25, 79 

Headlam, E. J. ; a new island in the Bay of Bengal, Reference to 22, 147 

Headlee, T. J., and Dean, George A., The mound-bulldlng prairie ant, 

Reference to 21, 451 

Heads and tails; a few notes relating to Sauropod dinosaurs; W. J. 

Holland 26, 153 

Healoton oil field 28, 159 

Heath, Habold, quoted on phosphorescent termites 21, 492 

Heave fault-slipping in California Coast Range region 26, 404 

Hebertella sp.. Fossil of the quartzite at Geneve 21, 527 

IX — Bull. Geol. See. Am. 



130 J. STANLEY-BROWX INDEX TO VOLUMES 21 TO 30 

Pafe 
IIrcker, O., citetl on voyages to determine intensity of gravity at sea . 26, 183 

Hedin, Sven, cited on climatic pulsations 25* 532 

"yardangs*' of central Asia 27, 564 

Hedstrom, H., cited on Ordovicic of Dalame 27, 604 

— , Reference to *'Geologiska notiser frftn Dalame" of 27, 604 

Heer, Oswau), cited on Miocene floras 30, 53ii-536 

Heilprin, a., cited on California Rocene 29, 283 

— , Geological work of 25. 161 

IIkim, Albhecht, cited on nietamorphisni 28, 402 

monocline '. 27.91-02 

structure of Alps i 29, 17,'S 

— elected C\>rresi)ondent 21, 4 

Heineck, F., cited on pillow .structure 25. 598 

Helderberg escarpment as a geological park 26, 110 

— Front, Structure of the 23, 50, 746, 567 

IIelderbergun invasion of the Onondaga coral fauna 27, 478 

— strata near Ci\\}e Girardeau, Missouri, Crinold genus Scyph^crinus 

from t 24, 110 

Helderbergs, Sberlmrne sandstone of the 30, 468 

II ELENA -Yellow STONE Park region, Jurassic erosion surface in 28, 161 

Helium, Accumulation of 28, 845 

— , Development of 26, 190 

— of Carnot spring, Santenay and CYsar spring, Nevis 26, 193 

Heix Creek l)e<ls 25, 325 

similar to the Lance 25, 358 

formation. Fossils of the 25, 357-359 

, Montana 25, 3,56 

Helmert, F. R., cited on pendulum observations 26, 174 

IIelmert*s formula of value of gravity at sealevel 26, 181 

Helmoltz, II. L. F. von, cited on age of the sun 28, 901 

Help-me-Jack Creek, Alaska 23, 567 

Hematite inclosed in a basic nndesite, The Barth iron-ore deposit 24,97 

Hemicones at the mouths of hanging valleys ; C. E. Devker 26, 76 

Henderson, J r nits, citeil on climatic changes 25, 548 

Henley, A. S., Discussion of coast range glaciation by 25, 121 

Hennen, U. C., cited on Coal Measure se<'tions 30, 583 

Hennen, R. v., cited on West Virginia oil field 28, 5&4 

Hennig, Edwin, cited on Tendaguru series 29, 264 

Henry, A. J., cited on precipitation in the United States 25, 538 

IlERBETTE, F., cltcd on cHmatlc pulsations 25, 532-533 

Herculantm and Pompeii, Sand at 21, 630 

Herkimer sandstone 29, 351 

Herold, S. C, Tertiary Xassidjp of the west coast of America 28, 227 

Herrick, C. L., cited on high-level terraces of Rio Grande Valley 21, 578 

Hersciikl, Sir John, and Babbage, Ch arij=:s, citinl as first to indicate 

tendency to isostasy 26, 178 

Hershey, O. H., cited on peneplains 29, 580 

— elected Fellow 21, 3 



IIERSHEY HILL 131 

Page 
Hershet, O. H. ; Geolo^cal reconnaissance of northeastern Nicaragua.. 

23, 36, 75, 493-516 
— ; Some Tertiary and Quaternary geology of western Montana, north- 
ern Idaho, and eastern Washington 23, 75, 517-535 

Hess, F. Lt, cited on allanlte 28, 480 

rare-earth metals 28, 860 

Hesse, Pillow lavas in 25, 597 

Heuvelton formation of the Canton, New York, quadrangle 26, 289 

Hewett, D. F. ; Manganese as a war mineral 30, 97 

Hewett, E. Ia, cited on climatic changes 25, 548 

HicE, R. U., C. E. Decker introduced by 26, 66, 7G 

— , Discussion of crustal movements in Lake Erie region by 26, 67 

— , Northern anthracite coal .field discussed by 24, 51 

— ; An unusual distortion of the lower Kittanning coal 22, 54, 716 

HiCKUNO, G., cited on deposits in Old Red Sandstone 27, 380 

Lower Old Red Sandstone 27, 365 

— , Description of Lower Old Red Sandstone by 27, 368 

— .Reference to **The Old Red Sandstone of Forfarshire, rpi>er and 

Lower" by 27, 365, 370, 394 

— , Table of Lower Old Red Sandstone by 27, 368 

Hicks, , cited on Llanvim series 27, 578 

Hidden, W. E., cited on allanite 28. 477 

uranium minerals * 28, 866 

HiGGiNS, D. F., cited on ellipsoidal greenstones 25, 619 

HiOH-OBADE clays of the United States ; H. Ries 30, 95 

— level Loop channel ; T. C. Hopkins 25, 68 

HiUNKETH, S. P., cited on early use of oil 28, 621 

petroleum 28, 667 

HiUGARO, B. W., Bibliography of 28, 54 

— cited on earth heat 30, 543 

— , Discussion of Bahia limestone plains, with reference to Santa Cruz 

Mountains and Susan River Valley, by .•. 21, 790 

geologic work of ants by 21, 790 

on f ang]omerate by 23, 72 

— , Memorial of 28, 40 

— ; New development at the mouth of the Misslssipi)i 21, 791 

— , Reference to reports by 25. 167 

— , Southern geological work of 25, 170 

— , Work on cotton reports of 25, 176 

Hiix, F. A., Bibliography of •. 28, 69 

— , ^Memorial of 28, 67 

Hill, J. B., cited on pillow lava 25, 604 

Hill, R. B., Reference to his history' of Manitoba 21, 408 

Hill, R. T., cited on Texas oil field 28, 575 

volcanoes of the Windward Islands 29, 627 

— , Comment on early geological work in Texas by 25, 165 

— , Commuted for life 26, 8 

— , Geological work in Arkansas-Texas region by 25, 165 



132 J. STANLEY-BROWN INDEX TO VOLUMES 21 TO 3O 

Page 
Hill, R. T. ; Geology of the Sierra Almoloya, with notes on the tectonics 

history of the Mexican plateau, Reference to 22, 155 

— , *Tlateau Plains" named by : 23, 713 

HiLLEBRAND, W. F.. Analyses by 27, 206, 215. 230 

of uranium minerals by 28, 863-864 

— , Analysis of Adirondack rocks by 25, 251 

felsophyre from Monterey Mountain, Virginia, by 24, 331 

Hills, R. C, "Granite felsophyre" name applied by 21, 665 

Himalaya reentrant and the Malay earth- lobe, Contrasted forms of 21, 191-195 
HiNDE, G. J., Reference to work on interglacial geology. .* 21. 435, 438 

— and Fox. Howard, cited on horizon of Radlolarian rocks, etcetera . . 21, 644 

Hinds, H., cited on Illinois oil fields 28, 664 

"Hinge line" suggested as preferable to "Isobase for zero" 21, 239 

HiNTON formation, Mississipplan delta of Virginia • 23, 451 

HiNTZE, C, cited on allanite 28, 472 

HiNTZE, F. F., Jb. ; Age of the Martiusburg shale as interpreted from its 

structural and stratlgraphical relations in eastern Pennsylvania . 29, 94 

— cited on tillite from Wasatch Mountains 27, 187 

Hipparion-like horses of the Pacific coast and Great Basin provinces; 

John C. Merrlam 27, 171 

History of the Alexandrian epoch in the Mississippi Valley 27, 314 

Bulletin by J. Stanley-Brown 25, 24 

Hitchcock, C. H., cited on Ammonoosuc glacier 27, 285-288, 290, 294 

Bethlehem moraine 27,265,267,268,270,273-278 

Carroll moraine 27,282-283 

Connecticut Valley terraces 25, 220 

glacial phenomena 27, 67 

glaciation in New Hampshire 27,264,291 

Hawaiian Islands 28, 270, 276, 504 

origin of pillow lavas 25, 641-642 

processes of drift transportation and deposition 21, 430 

— ; Devonian of the Tapper Connecticut Valley 25, 126 

— on Committee on Geological Magazine 21, 743 

— , Proposed call to geologists in 1888 to form a geological society 21, 745 

— , Remarks on State Survey methods in New England by 26, 138 

— , Secretary of meeting to discuss question of organizing geological 

society 21, 743 

— ; Supplementary note on the organization of the Geological Society of 

America 21, 741-746, 793 

— ; Terminal moraines in New England. 27, 294 

— ; Tertiary deposits of Oahu 23, 71 

rocks of Oahu 26, 133 

— and WiNCHEix, N. H., Call published in American Geologist June, 

1888, by 21, 745 

Hitchcock, Mrs. Charlotte E., Reference to l)ird's-eye view of Mount 

Toby of 22, 681 

Hitchcock, Edward, cited on Connecticut Valley terraces 25, 220 

Richmond boulder trains 21, 747 



HITCHCOCK HOLLAND 133 

Page 
niTCHcocK, Edward, cited on moraine-like deix)sits 27» 267, 277 

— quoted on Massachusetts natural bridge 21, 328 

— ; Description of a slide on Mount Lafayette at Franconia, New Hamp- 
shire 27, 277 

Hjort, Johan, Quoted on depth of sun-ray penetration from •article on 

"The Michael Sara North Atlantic Deep-sea Expedition" 22, 240 

HoBBS, W. H., cited on allanite 28, 466 

— ; Criticism of the Hayfordian conception of isostasy regarded from 

the standpoint of geology 25, 34 

— , Discussion of coastal subsidence by 25, 59, 61 

earthquake sea waves by 26, 33 

pillow lava by 25,33 

— ; Examples of Joint controlled drainage from Wisconsin and New 

York, Reference to 22, 143 

— ; Limited effective vertical range of the desert sand-blast, based on 
observations made in the Libyan desert and in the Anglo-Egyptian 

Sudan s . . . 26, 396 

— ; Lineaments of the Atlantic border region. Reference to 22, 144, 153 

— ; Mechanics of formation of arcuate mountains 25, 30 

— ; New evidence of the existence of fixed anticyclones above the conti- 
nental glaciers 26, 73 

— ; On some principles of seismic geology, Reference to 22, 146 

— ; Origin of the basins within the hamada of the Libyan desert 26,396 

— quoted on faults and Joints of the Pomeraug Valley 22, 167, 169 

— ; Range and rhythmic action of sand-blast erosion from studies In the 

Libyan - desert 26, 63 

— , Remarks on banded clay by 27, 112 

physiographic control in the Philippines by 26, 396 

— ; Repeating patterns In the relief and In the structure of the land .... 

22, 54, 123-176 

— ; River system of Connecticut, Reference to 22, 155 

— ; Transactions of the Wisconsin Academy of Science, Reference to. . 22,148 

HoBSON, B. ; The volcanoes of Mexico, Reference to 22, 154 

HocHSTETTiX, F. VON, clted on chemical deposition 28, 739 

Hodge, Edwin T., Remarks on Porto Rican geologic history 27, 84 

IIoFES, Hans, cited on origin of oil 28, 729 

petroleum 28, 555 

HdNiGSCHMiD, , cited on atomic weight of radium 28, 849 

Hoffman, , cited on Individual rights 28, 241 

Hoffmann, F., cited on pillow structure 25, 594 

HoFJOKUU-, Iceland, Remnants of Ice-cap In 21, 718 

HoFMAN, H. O., Memoir of Franklin R. Carpenter by 22, 48 

Hoc wallows, Referred to by E. W. Hilgard 21. 790 

HoLDEN, R. J., Fellow-elect 26, 116 

— , Orlskany iron ore. 27, 64 

Holland, Sie T. H., cited on charnocklte 27, 218 

salt de|x>slts 26, 474 

Simla tillite 27, 186 



134 J. STANLEY-BROWN INDEX TO VOLUMES 21 TO 30 

Page 
Holland, W. D. ; Skeleton of Diplodocus and Apatosaurus in the Car- 
negie Museum 27f 153 

Holland, W. J. ; The Carnegie Dinosaur quarry in Uintah County, Utah 22, 94 
— , Director Carnegie Museum, Invitation extended to the Paleontolog- 

ical Society by 22, 86 

— , Discussion on the armor of Stegosaurus by 21, To 

Varanosaunis species, a Permian Pelycosaur, by 21, 74 

— ; Head and tails: a few notes relating to Sauropod dinosaurs 26, 153 

— ; Pre-Cretaceous Dinosaurs 23, 85, 204 

— ; Report on classification of freight rates on fossils 23. 78 

— , Resolution concerning freight rates presented by 22, 53 

— ; Skull of Moropus elatus Marsh 22, 94 

— ; Some observations on the osteology of Diplodocus 29, 130 

— , Special mention made of 22, 68 

— ; Structure of the Sauropod Dinosaurs 21, 74 

HoLLicK, Abthl^, Acknowledgments to 25, 356 

— cited on fossils from Belly River formation 25, 370 

of Edmonton formation 25,366-367,375 

Mesozoic and Cenozoic floras 27, 465 

— ; New species of Ficus from the interglacial deposits of the Kootenay 

Valley, British Columbia 26, 159 

'—f Preliminary correlation of the Cretaceous and Tertiary floras of 

Alaska 24. 116 

— ; Results of a preliminary investigation of the Kenai flora of Alaska 

(read by F. H. Knowlton) 22, 91 

— , Vice-President Paleontologlcal Society, Opening session called to 

order by 23, 77 

— and Williams, Henry S. ; Migration 21, 73 

Holm, G., cited on Linibata limestone / 27, 590 

Ordovicic of Oeland 27, 610 

— , Ordovicic of Delarne 27, 604 

— , Reference to "Uel)er einige Trilobiten aus dem Phyllograptuschiezer 

Dalekarliens" of 27, 607 

— , Studies of Lake Venern County made by 27, 586 

Holmes, Abthub, cited on accumulation of lead 28, 849, 857 

age of the earth 28.810,835 

lead-uranium ratio 28. 863 

measurement of geologic time 28, 751 

radioactive transformations 26, 194 

radio-thermal action 28. 845, 903 

rate of denudation 28, 823 

thorium lead 28, 877-878 

— and RvTiiERPORD, Sir Ernest, cited on estimate for amount of radium 

in rocks 26, 196 

Holmes, Joseph Austin, Bibliography of 27, 31 

— , Memorial of 27, 22 

— , I'hotograph of 27, 22 

— , State Geologist of North Carolina 25, 160 



HOLMQUIST HORSETHIEF 135 

Page 
IIoLMQuiST, P. J., cited on metamorphism 28, 414 

HoLOCHOANiTES and Orthochoanltes, Relation of the Proloc'hoanltes to 30, 148 

HoLST, N. O., cited on duration of Glacial period in Sweden 25, 213 

— and Hummel, D., cited on origin of eskers of Sweden 21, 418 

HoLWAY, R. S., Apparent limits of former glaciation in the northern 

coast ranges of California 25, 120 

— , Dlscnission of climatic provinces by 26, 124 

epigene profiles of the desert by 26, 391 

— , Excursion of California Meeting, August 7, 1915, in charge of 26, 407 

— , Inquiries by 25, 125 

— , Remarks on the structure of the soutliern Sierra Nevada by 26, 404 

— and DiiJ^R, J. S. ; Characteristics of the Lassen Peak eruptions of 

May 20-22, 1915 26,397 

HoMESTAKE Ore body, Hyi>othe8is of the 24, 293 

, Location, rocks, and structure of 24, 293, 294 

, Position, form, and character of the replaced rocks of the 24, 299 

, Pre-Cambrian structure of the northern Black Hills as bearing 

on the 24, 73, 293-300, 704 

HoMO^UNE and monocline ; Reginald A. Dalj' 27, 89 

HoMOLooiEs of the borders and surfaces of the Scapulo-coracoid in rei)- 

tiles and mammals ; W. K. Gregory and C. L. Camp 28, 216 

HoMoix)GY of the "Alisphenoid" and "Lachrymal" in recent and fossil 

vertebrates ; W. K. Gregory 24, 118, 241-246 

Honduras, Geology of 29, 618 

HoNEL, J., cited on Stromboli 28, 265 

HooKE, R., cited on oolitic texture 25, 745 

Hopkins, F. V., Geological work in Louisiana of 25, 172 

Hopkins, T. C. ; Changes produced on springs by a sinking water table. . 

21,25,774 

— cited on Brewerton shale 29, 349 

Indiana oolitic limestones 25, 748 

— ; Glacial lakes and channels near Syracuse 21, 21, 761 

— , High-level Ixx)p channel 25, 68 

Hopkins, W., cited on thickness of earth's crust 26, 178 

Hormotoma gigantea beds, Anticosti island 21, 702 

HoRNBiJiNDE schist of NcA' Hampshire 25, 75 

HoRNE, John, cited on continental deposits 28, 742 

marine fauna 27, 365 

pillow lava 25, 606 

— and Peach, B., cited on petrography of Sailmhor rocks 27, 564 

^ ; "Geological structure of the northwest highlands of Scotland" 

of 27, 562 

, Reference to "Silurian rocks of Britain" by 27, 365 

Horned artidactyl from the Tertiary of Nebraska ; R. S. Lull 28, 211 

Horse, Pliocene monodactylous 27, 151 

Horses of Pacific coast, Hipparion-like 27, 171 

Horsethief Ridge and landslide, Butte, Montana, Deposits on 24, 541 



136 J. STANLEY-BROWN INDEX TO VOLUMES 21 TO 30 

Page 
IIosTETTEB, J. C, and SosMAN, R. B. ; Ferrous iron content and magnetic 
prot)ertie8 of the natural oxides of iron as an index to their origin 

and history 27, 60 

Hot Creek range, Faulted arch In, Figure showing. . . , 21, 554 

— Springs, Yellowstone National Park, Calcareous formations about 

Mammoth 21, 645 

HoTCHKiss, Jed., on Committee on Geological Magazine 21, 743 

HoTCUKiss, W. O., Acknowledgments to , 28, 432 

— cited on Cambrian sandstone at Ablemans, Wisconsin 27, 459 

— , Discussion of geological education of engineers by 28. 138 

— ; Method of measuring post-Glaclal time 28, 138 

Hotel Vcndome, Boston, Annual dinner in 21, 27 

— Walton, Philadelphia, Annual dinner at 26, 104 

Houghton, F., cited on geology of Erie County, New York 28, 946 

HovEY, E. O., acted as Secretary of t^rst Section 26, 65, 84 ; 26, 61 

Third Section 26, 99 

— , Address at Dana centenary : Dana, the teacher 24, 60 

— , Chairman Publication Committee, Report by 21, 17-19 

celebrated caverns 21, 328 

— cited on oolites 25, 761-762 

slliclous oolite from Center County, Pennsylvania 21, 649 

Wallibu and Rabaka gorges of Saint Vincent Island 21, 637 

— , G. C. Curtis introduced by 26, 77 

— , Discussion of Staten Island serpentine by 26, 88 

on volcanic action by 21, 23 

— elected Secretary 21, 2 ; 22, 2 ; 23, 2 ; 24. 9 ; 

26, 5 ; 26, 11 ; 27, 11 ; 28, 2 ; 29, 11 ; 30, 11 

— , A. K. Lol)eck Introduced by 26, 77 

— ; Notes on the geology of the region of Parker Snow Bay, Greenland. 29,98 

— , C. A. Reeds introduced by 26, 75 

— , Reiwrt of Secretary 21,35; 22,56; 23,38; 24,2; 

26,51; 26,5; 27,5; 28,6; 29,5; 30,4 

— , Secretary of First Section 24, 50 

Third Section 24, 72 

Petrologic*, Mlneralogic, and Economic Section 22, 67 

; Proceedings of the Thirtieth Annual Meeting of the Geological So- 
ciety of America, held at Saint Louis, Missouri, December 27, 28, 

and 29, 1917 29, 1 

— , Secretary ; Proceedings of the Thirtj'-first Annual Meeting of the Geo- 
logical Society of America, held at Baltimore, Maryland, Decem- 
ber 27 and 28, 1918 30, 1 

, Telegram to President Gilbert by 21, 27 

— , Toastmaster at annual dinner 26, 104 

Hovey, Horace Carter, Bibliography of 26, 25 

— , Discussion on natural bridges of North America by 2I, 22, 7G5 

— , Memorial of 26, 21 

— , Photograph of 26, 21 

Hovey Relief Expedition, Contribution to 28, 5 



HOWCHIN — HUMBOLDT 137 

Page 

HowcHiN, Walter, cited on tlllites of Australia 27, 186 

Howe. A. B., Analyses by 27, 642 

Howe, Ebnest, cited on glacial terraces 25, 223 

— , Discussion on volcanic action by 21, 23 

— , Geologic section of the Panama Canal Zone discussed by 24, 74 

— , Geological section, Isthmus of Panama, discussed by 23, 82 

— , Observations at the Kilauea Crater discussed by 24, 74, 707 

— ; Pyrrhotite, norite, and pyi*oxenite from Litchfield, Connecticut.... 26,83 

— quoted on landslides 21, 665 

— , Reference to his "Landslides in the San Juan Mountains, Colorado" 21, 664 

— , Secretary of Third Section 26, 81 

Howe, M. A., cited on chemical and organic sea deposits 28, 740, 933 

Howell, Edwin E., Memoir of, by Grove K. Gilbert 23, 30 

Hbafntinnuhbygoub, Iceland, Obsidian from 21, 32, 784 

— obsidian. Description of the 26, 258 

Hubbard, Bela, Condition of the Sylvania granule recognized by 21, 649 

Hubbard, George D., Discussion of local glaciers in Vermont by 28, 135 

— ; Evidence of very early glaciation In Ohio 24, 71, 696 

Hubbard, L. C, .cited on Keweenaw series 27, 94 

Hudson, G. U. ; External structure of steganoblastus as revealed through 

gum mountings and ohotomicrographic stereograms 28,203 

— ; Some structural features of a fossil embrj-o crinoid 28, 204 

Hudson and Connecticut valleys, Submergence of the 26, 63 

— Bay, Algal limestone on Belcher Islands 29, 90 

, Iron formations on Belcher Islands 29, 90 

, Paleozoic rocks in vicinity of 30, 339 

near 28, 171 

, Pillow lavas of 25, 612 

region. Correlation of Silurian of 30, 367 

, Devonian rocks of 30, 370 

— Champlain Valley, Marine waters in the 30, 90 

, Post-Glacial waters in the 30, 415 

, Reference to glacial phenomena in 25, 233 

— , Further light on the gorge of the 21, 21, 760 

— Uiver, Buried gorge of the 25, 89 

group, Anticosti and other groups and 21, 679 

, Post-Glacial course of 22, 179 

, Pre-Glacial course of the upper 22, 64, 177-186 

— Valley, Marine submergence of 25, 219 

, Topographic features of 30, 415 

Huene, Friedrich von, cited on latero-sphenoid 28, 981 

Ordovicic of Dalame 27, 604 

Hughes, T. McK., cited on Moel Tryfaen fossils 25, 211 

Huix, Edward, cited on theory of Carboniferous sequence 27, 493 

Human tyi)es of the old Stone Age of Europe, Migration and succession 

of 26, 149 

Humboldt, Alexander von, Geological work in Texas of 25, 164 

— quoted on destructiveness of ants 21, 455 



138 J. STANLEY-BROWN INDEX TO VOLUMES 21 TO 3O 



Page ■ 



Humboldt, Alexander von, Reference to Coastal Plain work by 25. 159 

— range. Ancient and recent tectonic of, Figure sliowing 21, 554 

, Cross-section of, Figure showing 21* 550 

Hume, W. F., cited on "Characteristics of Egyptian deserts" 27, 57 

climatic changes 25, 541 

Hummel, D., and Holst, N. O., cited on origin of eskers of Sweden. . . 21, 418 
Humphrey, R. L., and Soul6, Frank, cited on San Francisco earthquake 

and fire of 1906 21,405 

Humphreys, W. J., cited on solar radiation 25, 83 

volcanic dust 30, 539, 561 

relation to climatic changes , 25, 483-484 

Hungary, Oil fields of 28. 574 

Hunt, A. R., cited on sand grains 21, 775 

Hunt, T. S., cited on allanite 28, 471 

anticlinal principle in oil development 28, 626 

chemical deposition 28, 739 

cores 27, 74 

history of petroleum 28, 555 

' rock decay 21, 630 

Hunt, W. F., and Kraus, E. H. ; Variable composition of melanochalcite 27, 61 
Hunter formation, Oklahoma, The new stratigraphic units of the ; Ches- 
ter A. Reeds 22,92 

Huntington, Ellsworth, cited on climate of primitive historic era. . . 28, 826 

measurements of geologic time 28, 747 

Otero Basin terraces of New Mexico 25, 562 

sun-spot cycle 28, 825 

— , Discussion of coastal subsidence by 25. 60 

— ; Glaciation and stormy peri<3d of the fourteenth century 27, 67 

— ; Post-TerUary history of the lakes of Asia Minor and Syria 21, 20, 755 

— , Reference to work of 28. 738 

— ; Solar hj-pothesis of climatic changes 25, 82, 477 

Huntley, I>. G., cited on oil-field geology 28, 555 

oil-field structure 28, 640 

origin of oil 28,734 

Hi'NTSviLLE basin and Bear River plateau, Utah, Sketch map showing 

part of 21, 540 

— fault, Wa.satch range, I)escrii)tion of 21, 540, 541 

HuRONiAN ice age 27, 186 

Hussakof, L. ; (Cranium of the l*leuracanthldje 23, 87 

— and Bryant, W. L. ; Fish fauna of the (*onodont bed (basal Genesee) 

at Eighteen-mile Creek, New York 26, 154 

CuMiNGS, E. R. ; Paleontologic evidence of recapitulation 21,74 

Hu»tedia morrnonu Fossils of Wasatch region. 2I, 530 

Hutchinson. C. T., cited on submerged '*deeps" 28, 335 

Hutton, ChartJ':s, cited on method of dissecting a mountain mass into 

elements 24, 173 

Schehallien and Cavendish methods for determining density.. 26,173 

IIUTTON, James, Reference to work of .^ 29, 173 



I 



HUXLEY ICE 139 

Page 

Huxi^v, T. H., cited on determination of geologic time *. 28, 842 

epiotic * 28, 986 

estimates of geologic time 28, 811 

— , Quotation from writings of 30, 565 

Hyatella congesta beds, Anticosti island 21, 709 

Hyatt, Aij>HEru8, and his principles of research ; Robt. T. Jackson. . . . 24, 105 

Hydrothebmal mineral, Sericite, a low temperature 26, 395 

Hydbous silicate melts ; N. L. Bowen and G. W. Morey 29, 102 

IIyopsodus, Affinities of 26, 152 

Hypersthene-andesine syenite 27, 197 

— syenite, Analyses of 27, 200, 202 

and related rocks of the Blue Ridge region, Virginia ; Thomas L. 

Watson and Justus H. Cline 27, 193 

compared with charnockite 27, 218 

pyroxene syenite 27, 212 

(akerite) of the middle and northern Blue Ridge region, Virginia; 

T. L. Watson and J. H. Cline 26, 82 

Hypothesis for the relation of normal and thrust-faults in eastern New 

York ; G. H. Chadwick 28, 100 

— of the origin of coal, Inadequacy of the sapropelic 24, 73, 706 

I 

Iberian peninsula of Ordovicic times 27, 581 

Ice age, Huronian 27, 186 

, Late Precambrian 27, 186 

, Permocarboniferous 27, 184 

, Pleistocene ..*... 27, 183 

— as an erosive agent 21, 719 

— iKKiy in New York State, liaurentian ( Labradorian ) 24, 135 

relation of land uplift, Reference by H. L. Fairchild to 27, 249 

— cap beveling. Characteristics of 21, 723 

erosion. Features of 21, 723-730 

in Iceland, Present extent of 21, 718 

, Remnants of 21, 718 

— erosion, Cycle of 21, 736 

, Influence on Hudson River and Lake George depression 22, 182 

— flood period, E. C Andrews and others, named by 21, 718 

, Characteristics of 21, 720 

, Figure showing sections of 21, 724 

— scoring in a glacial climate, Extent of 23, 541 

— sheet beveling, ViehX i)roblein of 21, 727 

erosion and deposition in the region of the Great Lakes, Study of; 

Frank Bursley Taylor 22, 65, 727 

in New York State, Constructional work ; I. Subglacial ; drumlins ; 

II. Marginal ; moraines of the 24, 143-146 

, Erosional work of the 24, 138 



140 J. STANLEY-BROWN INDEX TO VOLUMES 21 TO 30 

Page 

Iceland, •Alteration of land surface since ice recession in 21, 718 

— , Area of lowland coastal strips of 21, 717 

— , Basalt fomjation l)edrock in north 21, 718 

— , Condition during the Glacial eix)ch in 21, 718 

— , Elevation and composition of 21, 717 

— , Features of valley glacier erosion in 21, 719-723 

— , Glacial action in New Zealand and Alaska compared with that in. . 21,720 

— , Glaciers and volcanoes dominant geological features of 21, 717 

— , Groups of mountain glaciation in 21, 718 

— , Habitation In and barrenness of 21, 717 

— , Names of master valleys in north 21, 720 

— , Obsidian from Ilrafntinnuhrj ggur 21, 32, 784 

; its lithophys(e and markings 26, 255 

— , Pillow lavas of 25, 608-610 

— , Signs of glaciation in the upland surface of northern 21, 724 

— , Some effects of glacier action in 21, 20, 717-730 

— , Soundings by the Danish government in 21, 718 

— , Summary of effects of. glacial action in 21, 727 

— , Thickness of formation in north 21, 718 

— , Upland surface in 21, 718 

IcKES, E. L. ; Contribution to the geology of eastern Oregon 21, 791 

Idaho, Bannock thrust, a major fault in southeastern 24, 50, 675 

— , Early glaciation In northern 23, 530 

— , Ek)cene in 29, 89 

— formation. Fauna of 29, 162 

— . Pillow lavas of 25, 617 

— , Stratigraphy of Beckwith and Bear River formations in 2T, 70 

— , Structural features of southeastern 24, 59, 675 

— , Tulare Pliocene fauna of 29, 152 

— , Valleys of Clearwater country 23, 532 

Idaho-Wyominq, Geologi(r map of Wayan quadrangle 27, 65 

Iddings, J. P., Analysis of the lithophysje of Obsidian Cliff, Yellowstone 

National Park : 26, 259 

— cited in discussion of alkaline rocks 21, 88 

on allanite 28, 465 

igneous magmas 29, 458 

magma tic assimilation 25, 261 

monzonite and granodiorite 27, 204 

— pillow structure 25, 635 

spherulites or llthophysw' of Yellowstone National Park 26, 255 

volcanic phenomena 28, 273 

— , Discussion of New Jersey gneisses by 25, 45 

pillow lava by ^ 25, 33 

— ; Fracture valley system. Reference to 22, 153 

— ; Geolog>' of the Yellowstone National Park, Reference to 22, 111 

— , Igneous rocks, 1909, Reference to 21, 152 

— , Memorial of Arnold Hague by 29, 35 

— , Objects and methods of petrographic description discussed by 24 76 



IDDINGS — ILLINOIS 141 

Page 

iDDiNGS, J. P., Obserrations at the Kilaaea Crater discussed by 24, 74 

— , Photograph of Yellowstone natural bridge by 21, 323 

— quoted on igneous rocks and flow-breccias 26, 401 

-the lithophysae in the Obsidian Cliff apherulltes 26, 256 

— , Reference to "Igneous rocks" by 27, 204 

— , Remarks on silicate melts by 27, 48 

— . Studies of Yellowstone Park rhyoUtes by 22, 111 

— and Cross, Whitman, Distribution of allanite in the siliceous Igneous 

rocks of the Rocky Mountains shown by 22, 122 

Iditarod region, Alaska, Geology' of 27, 114 

Igneous complex of high Titanium, phosphorus-bearing rocks of Am- 
herst-Nelson counties, Virginia ; Thomas L. Watson and Stephen 
Talx)r 24, 53, 682 

— dike rocks from middle western Virginia, Chemical analyses of..,. 24,331 

in Virginia, Chemical analyses table and table of norms of 24, 331, 332 

_ — ^ Mlneraloglcal and textural characters of 24, 333 

— dikes in central western Virginia, Petrology of a series of 24, 302-334 

— magmas, Two-phase convection in 29, 101 

— rock of Starks Knob, Age of 24, 349 

— rocks 27, 625 

and thermal waters, Eocene 21, 104 

, Miocene 21, 106 

^ Pliocene 21. 107 

, Complex of alkaline 21, 32, 785 

. Diamond Hill-Cumberland district 26, 440-4'ft 

discussed by members 29, 101 

, Division of, Into Atlantic and Pacific branches not warranted. . . 21, 114 

, Internal structures of 29, 100 

of District of Columbia 28, 155 

Yukon- Alaska boundary iB5, 203 

, Pennsylvania Piedmont pre-Cambrian 26, 81 

, L. V. Plrsson cited on 21, 109 

, Relative efficiency of normative and modal classifications of 30, 91 

within Yellowstone Park, Absaroka Range and the Wind River pla- 
teau, Area of 22, 104 

— Trlassic rocks near Gettysburg, Pennsjivania * 27, 55 

Illinois, Alexandrian rocks of 27, 305 

northeastern 26, 95, 155 

— and Missouri, Stratigraphy and paleontology of the Alexandrian series 

in 24, 111, 351-375 

~, Chester group In 27, ise 

— , Fairmont limestone quarry In 26, 70 

— , Glacial erosion In central 26, 70 

— oil field ; F. H. Kay 28, 156 

fields of 28, 561, 655 

— , Sketch map locating Fairmont quarry with respect to limit of early 

Wisconsin glacier ^. 26, 71 

— , Uplift In 29, 201 



142 J. STANLEY-nROWX INDEX TO VOLUMES 21 TO 30 

iLLrsTRATiONS of iutruformatioiml <*orni'<ntion ; J. M. Clarke 25* 37 

the deformation of limestone under regional compression; D. II. 

Nevvland 28, 163 

recent exix>8ure of the Saratoga Springs ; J. M. Clarke 26, 38 

I1.MENITE-APATITK gabhro 27, 228 

Imperial Mineral Resources Bureau, liondon, England; W. G. Miller. . 30,100 
Importance of "coral reefs" and reef deposits in the formation of Paleo- 
zoic limestones ; Thomas C. Brown 27, 147 

nivation as an erosive factor and of soil flow as a transporting 

agency in northern Greenland ; W. E. Ekblaw 29, 72 

water as a magmatic constituent ; George VV. Morey* 27, 50 

Improvements in methods of investigating highly carbonized materials 

and their bearing on the mode of deix)sition of coal ; E. C. JeflPrey 26, 58 
Inclusion of the Pleistocene period in the Psychozoic era ; A. W. Grabau 

SO, 149 
Index- Ellipsoid in petrographic-microscople work ; F. E. Wright. . . 24. 53, 681 

Index to Ulrich*s Revision of the Paleozoic systems 24, 625 

India, (^limatic changes in 26, 481 

— , Petroleum supply of 28, 614 

Indian Meteorological Dei>artment cited on climatic changes 26, 481 

• — Ueservation, Geologic map of Fort Hall 27, 64 

Indiana, Natural bridge at Attica 21, 317 

— , Oil fields of 28, 156, 561 

— , Oil production in 28, 667, 669 

*-, Uplift in 29, 201 

Influence of Silurian-Devonian climates on the rise of air-breathing 

vertebrates ; Joseph Barrell 27, 40, 387 

Infundibular diaphragms 26, 351 

Inorganic production of oolitic structures ; W. II. Bucher 29, 103 

Insectivora ; William K. Gregory 23, 192 

Interglacial beds, Earliest 26, 71 

, Lethbridge, Alberta 24, 552 

— deposits in other places than the Don and Scarboro beds 26, 251 

— epoch in British Isles and in United States 26, 213 

— period. Climatic conditions during Aftonian 21, 120 

, Length and character of the earliest ; A. P. Coleman 26, 243-254 

-^ time, licngth of ^6, 252 

Interior province. Cretaceous sedimentation of the 26, 343 

(Illinois and Missouri wal fields), Pottsville- Allegheny boundary 

in the 24, 75, 716 

INTERMOLECULAR attractions and oil and gas accumulation ; E. W. Shaw 28, 158 

Internal structures of igneous rocks ; F. F. Grout 29, 100 

International geological excursion in 1913, Reference to 27, 113 

Internationalization of mineral resources ; C. K. I^ith 30, 107 

Interpretation of sedimentary rocks. Symposium on 28, 735 

iNTRAPORMATioNAL corrugatiou, Illustratious of 26, 37 

— structure in the Ordoviclan limestone of central Pennsylvania ; R. M. 

Field 28, 166 



* 



INVERTEBRATE IROQUOIS 143 

Invertebrate fauna. Marine TriaHsir 27. 172 

of the Grassy Creek shale of Missouri ; D. K. Greger 29, 95 

Morrison, Lists of described species of the 26, 343 

;T. W. Stanton 26,90.151,343-348 

— faunas of Mexico, Correlation Ijetween those of California and the. . 26, 414 
the American Trlassic; relations to those of Asia and Europe; 

J. P. Smith 26, 412 

— paletmtolojjrlst, Criteria of correlation from the point of view of the. 26,410 

— I>aleontolog>', Titles of papers on 23, 84 

Invertebrates, Rank of mutations and subnuitations among 27, 148 

— , Relation of vertebrate faunal zones to 27, 172 

lN\T!:sTiGATioN8 iuto the magnitude of the forces which are reipiired to 

induce movements in various rock<4 under the conditions which ob- 
tain in the deeper part of the earth's crust ; Frank D. Adams and 

J. Austin Bancroft 28, 125 

Investments 26, 8 

iNviLLiERS, E. V. D*. Cited on Pennsylvania oolites 26, 760 

loNE formation of the Sierra Nevada foothills, a local facies of the upper 

Tejon-Eocene ; R.*E. Dickerson 26, 168 

Iowa and Nebraska sand and gravel l)eds. Evidence fossiliferous, are 

Aftonian 21, 31 

— , Kansan drift in 27, 115 

— lakeside laboratory. Location of 21, 122 

— , Natural bridges of Jackson County 21, 332 

— , Pleistocene deposits in Crawford County and Carroll County 29, 77 

lowAN drift ; Samuel Calvin 22, 65, 729 

; Frank Leverett 24, 71, 698 

Ireland, Formation of dunes of Galway 21, 647 

— , Pillow lavas in 25, 608 

Iron formation on Belcher Islands, Hudson Bay, with special reference 

to its origin and its associated algal limestones; E. S. Moore 29,90 

— . Mineral hydroxides of 27, 61 

— ore deposit at Barth, Nevada ; J. Claude Jones 24, 96 

detK)Sits of Clinton County, New York 30, 93 

(peculiar) from the Dunham mine, Pennsylvania; W. S. Bayley.. 23,44 

of the Lake Superior region. Progress of opinion as to the origin of 

the 23, 51, 317-324 

, Oriskany 27, 64 

— ores at Kiruna, Swe<len, Origin of the 26, 99 

— oxides. Ferrous content and magnetic proi)erties of 27, 61 

Irondequoit limestone 29, 352 

Iroquois and Algonquin l)eaches, Isobases of the 21, 21, 227-248, 761 

, Relative ages of 21, 241 

plane, Measurements of 21, 242, 243 

inferior waters in northern New York ; II. L. Fairchild and G. H. 

Chadwick 22, 64 

, Quotation from memoir of J. W. Spencer on the 24, 217 

— Beach, Table of elevations 24, 221 



144 J. STANLEY-BROWN INDEX TO VOLUMES 21 TO 30 

Page 
Iroquois Lake's flooding on south shore, Reference by II. L. Fairchild 

to 27, 247 

— Mohawk River, Change of course of SO, 415 

— water-plane 21, 241 

, sliore, and higher terraces and phine 24, 218, 219, 224 

IBVINE, Robert, cited on diemical deposition 28, 7.19 

oolites 25. 759 

Irving, J. I)., cited on metamorphism 28, 407 

— , Memorial of 30, 37 

— , Pre-Oambrian structure of the northern Black Hills as bearing on the 

Iloniestake ore body discussed by 24, 73, 705 

— , Report on Nomenclature of Faults discussed by 24, 49 

— , Services of 30, 403 

Irving, R. D., cited on Keweenaw series 27, 94, 99 

sand grains from the Herman, Potsdam, and Saint Peter forma- 
tions of Minnesota, Wisconsin, and Michigan 21, 649 

Wisconsin minerals 29, 394 

IscHYROMYDiG, Osteology and relationsliip of parmys and the affinities 

of the 21, 74 

Islands, Subsidence of reef-eucircUng. . . * 29, 489 

IsoBASFS and the pre-Cambrian boundary 21, 245-247 

" — for zero," Term used by De Geer 21, 239 

— of Pleistocene uplift. Outline map of 27. 253 

the Algonquin and Iroquois beaches and their significance; James 

Walter Goldthwait 21, 227-248, 761 

Iroquois plane • 21, 242 

— , Reference by H. L. Fairchild 27, 237 

IsoBASic map of the Algonquin and Iroquois beaches 2I, 233 

Isolation as a factor in the development of Paleozoic faunas; A. W. 

Grabau 29, 143 

— In paleontology ; John M. Clarke 21, 74 

IsosTACY, Theory of ; W. M. Davis 21, 25, 777 

— and radioactivity ; G. F. Becker 26, 86, 171-204 

— , Criticism of the Hayfordian conception of 25, 34 

— , Premonitions of , 26, 172 

IssEL, A., cited on pillow structure 25, 599 

Isthmus of Panama, Remarks on the geological section of tlie 23, 82 

Italian volcanoes, Saline fumarole deposits of 27, 61 

Italy, Pillow lavas of 25, 599 

— , Present conditions of tlie volcanoes of southern 26, 105, 375-388 

Ithaca, New York, (Jeological Society of America organized at 21, 746 

Ives, J. C, Newberry exi)lored the Colorado River with 27, 493 

J 

jACALiTos formation at Coalinga, California 27, 172 

Jack, R. L., citeil on Misima Island 29, 559 

Jackson, C. T., cited on Keweenaw series 27, 94 

limestone of Diamond Hill-Cumberland district 25, 443 



JACKSON JEFFERSON 145 

Page 

Jackson, C. T., cited on serpentine 25, 461 

— , Discussion of phylogeny of crlnoids by 26, 135 

— , Geological work In Georieria of 25, 174 

— , Meeting presided over by 25, 136 

— . Work in Diamond Hill-Cumberland district by 25, 438 

Jackson County, Iowa, Natural bridges of 21, 332 

— flora of North America 29, 633 

Jackson, G. W., cited on Chicago blue clay 29, 242 

Jackson, R. T. ; Alpheus Hyatt and his principles of research 24, 105 

— , Paleontologlcal notes discussed by 24, 109 

— and Pen HALLOW, D. P. ; Phylogeny and paleontology 21, 74 

Jackson, T. M., Memorial of 24,48; 25,13 

— , Photograph of 25, 13 

Jaerel, Otto, cited on postnasal 28, 985 

Jamtland, Ordovlcic of 27, 608 

JAGOAR, T. A., Jr., cited on Hawaiian Islands 28, 504 

"Pele's Tears" 27, 53 

— , Discussion on Hawaiian volcanoes by 21, 22 

— ; Genetic classification of active volcanoes 21, 23, 768 

— ; Structure of esker-fans experimentally studied 28, 51, 746 

— ; Succession in age of the volcanoes of Hawaii 23, 747 

— ; Tarumal, a cumulo-volcanlc eruption in Japan, 1909 21, 23, 768 

Jahn, Jaboslav J., Reference to ''Geologlsche exkurslon im Xlteren 

palaeozoikum mittelbQhmens" of 27, 584 

Jamaican Ridge, Geology of 29, 618 

James Bay, Paleozoic rocks in vicinity of 30, 339 

near 28, 171 

region, Devonian rocks of 30, 370 

uplift discussed by Frank Leverett 29, 70 

JANENSCH, Webneb, clted on skeleton of dinosaur from German East 

Africa in Berlin Museum 26, 153 

Tendaguru series 29, 265 

— quoted on Fraas's view that O. africanus accords with the North 

American genus DiplodocuB 26, 329 

Jannasch, p., Analyses by 27, 207 

Jannettaz, finouABD, cited on experimental geology 29, 183 

Japan, Coal deposits of 28, 130 

— Cretaceous faunas compared with those of western United States.. 26,414 

— , Petroleum supply of 28, 615 

— , Tarumal, a cumulo-volcanic eruption in 1909 in 21, 23, 768 

— , Triassic deposits of ; H. Yabe 26, 413 

Java. Reference to climatic changes in 26, 482 

Jeffebson, M. S. W. ; Beach cusps 21, 26 

— cited on beach cusps 21, 601, 603 

— ; Meanders and scallops 21, 26 

— , Reference to paper on "Shore phenomena on Lake Huron" of 21, 602 

"On the lake shore" of 21, 603 

— ; Theory of formation of beach cusps 21, 616 

X — Bull. Geol. Soc. Am. 



146 J. STANLEY-BROWN INDEX TO VOLUMES 21 TO 30 

Page 

JEFFEBSON, THOMAS, Reference to Coastal Plain work by 25* 159 

Jeffebson County, New York, Natural bridges of 21, 332 

Jeffbey, E. C. ; Evidence as tp the mode of formation of coal derived 

from the deposits of Japan, China, and Manchuria 28» 130 

— , Improvements in methods of investigating highly carbonized ma- 
terials and their bearing on the deposition of coal 26, 58 

— ; Inadequacy of the sapropelic hypothesis of the origin of coal. . . 24, 73, 706 
— ; Microscopic study of certain coals in relation to the sapropelic hy- 
pothesis 21. 33, 788 

— ; Nature of the substance known as the Mother of Coal and Its rela- 

.tion to the process of coal formation 24, 75, 715 

— ; Petrified coals and their bearing on the origin of coal 28. 130 

— , Relation of vertebrate fauna in Red Beds between Wichita Falls, 

Texas, and Las Vegas, New \iexico, discussed by 24, 52 

— , Shinarump conglomerate discussed by 24, 52 

Jenks, a. E., cited on Philippine irrigation 28, 534 

Jennings, O. E., Reiwrt on a collection of Oligocene plant fossils from 

Montana 29. 147 

Jensen, II. J., Known facts of origin of alkaline rocks, disagreeing with 

hypothesis of 21, 118 

Jessup, J. M., Reference to work in Wasatch Mountains 21, 517 

Jesijp, Mobbis K., acknowledgments to 30, 579 

Joes Rock granite porphyry and felsite of Diamond Hill-Cumberland dis- 
trict 25. 456 

John Boyd Thacheb Park : The Ilelderberg escarpment as a geological 

park ; G. F. Kunz 26, 110 

John Day Valley, Fauna of 26. 169 

Johnson, B. L., cited on ellipsoidal greenstones 25. 620 

Labradorite porphyry dikes 25, 452 

Johnson, D. W., Acting Secretary First Section 26, 90 

— ; Beach cusps 21, 27, 599-624 

— cited on local glaciation 27. 672 

phenomena in Adirondack region 27, 650 

— , Contra-imposed shorelines discussed by 24, 72, 699 

— ; Date of local glaciation in the White, Adirondack, and Oatskill 

Mountains 28, 136, 543 

— , Discussion of coastal subsidence by 25, 62 

earthquake sea waves by 25, 34 

intraformational corrugation 25, 37 

Red Beds by 25, 82 

on post-Tertiary history of the lakes of Asia Minor and Syria by. . 

21, 20, 756 

rock streams of Veta Mountain 21, 26, 774 

— , Evidence of recent subsidence on the coast of Maine analyzed by. . . 26,92 

— , Armin K. Ix)beck introduced by 27, 108 

— ; Physiographic features of western Europe as a facrtor in the war. . 26, 110 
notes on the White Mountains 27, 108 




JOHNSON JONES 147 

Page 
Johnson, D. W., Piedmont terraces and post- Jurassic history of the 

northern Appalachians discussed by 24, 70, 691 

— , Post-Glacial earth movements discussed by 24, 74, 715 

— ; Precise leveling and the problem of coastal subsidence 25, 59 

— . Reference to fleld-work by 30, 472 

paper on "The origin of beach cusps" of ; 21, 603 

war work of 30, 176 

— , Roots in the underclays of coal discussed by 24, 76 

— ; Stability of the Atlantic coast 23, 49, 739 

— ; Submarine chamspc^'parls bog at Woods Hole, Massachusetts, and its 

relation to the problem of coastal subsidence 24, 72, 699 

Johnson, H. R., Thanks rendered to 27, 679 

Johnson, John; Some factors which affect the disposition of calcium 

carbonate 27, 49 

Johnson, J. E., Acknowledgments to 27, 264 

Johnson, J. II., Work in Diamond Hill-Cumberland district by 26, 438 

Johnson, R. H. ; Cause of the absence of water in dry sandstone beds. 29, 105 

— cited on oil-field geology 28, 555 

structure 28, 640 

sands 28, 596 

origin of oil 28, 734 

Johnson, Whxabd D. ; Recent faulting in Owens Valley, California. . . 21, 792 

Johnson-IjAvis, H. J., citetl on origin of pillow hivas 26, 53, 639 

pillow lavas 26, 610, 634 

Johnston, John, Introduced by A. L. Day 26, 83 

— , Remarks on blood of oysters and other animals contains copper by. . 26, 86 
— ; Some effects of pressure on rocks and minerals 26, 83 

— and Adams, L. H. ; On the effect of high pressure on the physical and 

chemical behavior of solid subsUmces 24, 50, 674 

Johnston, W. A., cited on clays of Ottawa Valley 20, 198 

experimental geology 29, 183 

Leda clay 28, 314 

Ottawa City district 29, 215 

marine fossils in Ottawa district * 29, 199 

— ; Records of Lake Agassiz in southeastern Manitoba and adjacent 

parts of Ontario, Canada 28, 145 

Johnstone, J., cited on marine life 28, 906 

solubility-product constant 28, 935, 936 

Jointing, Photograph of pre-Onondaga 27, 74 

Joints and faults comprised in one system 22, 166 

JoLY, , cited on mode of origin of uranium and thorium 26, 194 

JoLY, John, clte<l on chemical denudation 28, 834, 835 

marine deposits 28, 739 

— and Rutherford, E., cited on means devised for estimating the age of 

rocks 26, 190 

Jones, J. C, cited on chemical evidence regarding Pyramid Lake 27,67 

climatic changes in southwest 26, 558 

— , Discussion of Arizona erosion and deposition by 26, 125 



148 J. STANLEY-BROWN INDEX TO VOLUMES 21 TO 30 

Page 

Jones, J. C, Discussion of Trlassic faunas by 26, 412 

— , Gypsum and auhydiite from tlie Ludwlg mine discussed by 24, W 

— , Inquiries by 1 25, 125 

— introduced by J. C. Merrlara 26, 392 

— ; Iron-ore deposits at Barth, Nevada 24, 96 

— ; Note on the occurrence of a mammalian Jaw, presumably from the 

Tniclcee beds of western Nevada 29, 161 

— ; Occurrence of stibnite and metastibnite at Steamboat Springs, Ne- 
vada 26, 126 

— ; Origin of the tufas of Lake Lahontan." 26, 392 

— , Physiographic features of bolsoms discussed by 26, 393 

— , Remarks on the Lassen Peak eruptions by 26, 397 

Jones, O. T., cited on pillow lava 25, 601, 603 

Jones, W. P., Coal-bearing Eocene of western Washington. I. Pierce 

County 25, 121 

Jordan, D. S., cited on respiratory organ of amphibian 27, 418 

— , Reference to "A guide to the study of fishes" by 27, 418 

Jornada del Muerto, New Mexico, Carbonic limestone formation in.. 21,560 

— , Reference to fault-scarpg of 26, 65 

Judd, J. W., cited on metamorphism 28, 397 

Stromboli 28, 263 

Judith River beds compared w^ith Belly River beds 25, 369 

correlated with Belly River and OJo Alamo beds 25, 380 

fauna, Relations of the 25, 393 

formation 25, 346 

Jukes, , cited on spheroidal structure 25, 634 

Jukes-Browne, A. J., cited on geologic climates - 30, 550 

Lingula flags and Memevian 27, 557 

Ix)wer Old Red in South Wales 27,367 

monoclines 27, 91 

Old Red Sandstone '. 27, 351, 383-384 

— , Reference to "The building of the British Isles" by 27, 351, 367, 382 

JuLiEN, A. A., Alteration processes and products Vithin the Greenville 

limestone 24, 76, 717 

Juniata and Queenston red be<ls, Delta deposits of North America 24, 430 

Jupiter River formation, Anticosti island 21, 713 

, Fossils of 21, 713-715 

, Location, composition, and thickness of 21, 713-715 

. , Zones and fauna of 21, 713-715 

Jurassic age of slates at Slate Springs, California 24, 131 

— and opening of Cretaceous time In North America, Close of; II. F. 

Osborn 26, 295-302 

— erosion surface in Montana 28, 161 

— floras 30, 517 

— (I*ost-) history and Piedmont terraces of the northern Appalachians. 

24, 70, 690 

— of Mexico 29, 604 

North and South America 29, 609 



JURASSIC KEEWATIN 149 

Page 
Jurassic Saurian remains Ingested within fish; O. R. Eastman 23»87 

— time, Discussion of 27, 507 

, Earth movements In * 30, 516 

— to the Cretaceous, Symposium on the passage from the 26, 90, 151 

K 

Kahlenbebg, Lh, cited on allanite 28, 492 

Kahn, I^etee, cited on early Pennsylvania oil fields 28, 620 

Kalitbky, K., cited on oil fields 28, 563 

Kalkowsky, E., cited on metamorpblsm 28, 383 

Kalm, Petes, cited on height of Niagara Falls before separation 21, 443 

measurement of Niagara Falls 27, 78 

Paleozoic organic remains near RabM^ck 27, 585 

Kame and esker deposits. Birds Hill vicinity 21, 424-427 

Kangerdluarsuk (Greenland) , Area of uephelite syenite of 21, 90 

Kan SAN and Aftonian sec^tions, Figures showing contact 21, 129 

— drift and fosslliferous silt, Sioux Falls section 23, 712 

in Iowa 27, 115 

, Sioux Falls section 23, 148 

Kansas and Guadalupian sections. Correlation of 21, 76 

— , Metamorphic area of 28, 419 

—, Oil fields of 28, 569-570, 687 

— , Peneplains in '. 28, 160 

— , Quartzites of 28, 164 

Kato, B., cited on "festoon islands" of Japan 28, 507 

Philippine geology 28, 527 

Katz, F. J., cited on Maine Leda clay 28, 313 

New England submergence 30, 599 

— ; Late Pleistocene shoreline in Maine and New Hampshire 29, 74 

— and Mabtin, G. C, Reference to "A geologic reconnaissance of the 

Iliamna region, Alaska," of 27, 697, fOO 

Kavdebn, Walteb, Reference to his obsen^ations of the Tupaia and 

Lemuridffi 24, 247 

Kay, F. H. ; Oil fields of Illinois 28, 156, 655 

Kay, G. F., J. E. Carman introduced by 23, 47 

— ; Pleistocene deposits between Manilla, in Crawford County, and Coon 

Rapids, in Carroll County, Iowa 29, 77 

— ; Some features of the Kansan drift in southern Iowa 27, 115 

Kayseb, Emanuel, elected Corresiwndeut 21, 4 

— , Reference to "Lehrbuch der Geologlschen Formatlonskunde" of . . . . 27, 556 

Kkele, J., cited on Cambrian fossils from Alaska 26, 193 

Macmillan River beds of Alaska 26, 202 

— , Reference to "Report on the upper Stewart River region, Yukon," 

of 27, 716 

Keene Valley group of the glacial lakes, Adirondacks 27, 667 

Keewatin, Climate and physical conditions of the 21, 25 

— Glacier younger than Labrador Glacier 26, 212 



150 J. STAXLEY-BROWN INDEX TO VOLUMES 21 TO 30 

Page 

Keewatin lee-sheet 25, 212 

, Extent of the upper and lower drift of the 24, 554 

, Pre-Wisconsin drift of the 24, 545 

Keidel, H., cited on tilUtes In Argentina 27, 185 

— , Discoverj' of glaelatlon in Argentina by 25, 31 

Keisley beds of Britain 25, 286 

Keith, Arthur, cited on Blue Ridge granite 27, 224 

Catoctln rock 27, 233 

Front Royal syenite 27, 196 

~r Maine Leda clay 28, 313 

Max Patch granite 27,222 

New England submergence 30, 599 

Pennsylvania peneplains 20, 577 

— , Delta deposits discussed by 23, 48, 745 

— , Discussion of deformation of limestone by 28, 163 

Newfoundland Algonklan rocks by 25, 40 

Red Beds of Wyoming by 28, 169 

— on a progress geologic map of Oklahoma by 21, 29 

Appalachian Mountains of Maryland by 21, 24, 769 

geology of the Wasatcli Mountains by 21, 22 

— elected Councilor Geological Society for 1912-1914 23, 2 

— ; Further discoveries in the Taconic Mountains 24, 53, 680 

— ; New evidence of the Taconic question 23, 35, 720 

— ;^leistocene deformation near Rutland, Vermont 28, 165 

— ; Pre-Cambrian unconformity in Vermont 25, 39 

— ; Production of apparent dlorlte by metamorphlsm 24, 54, 684 

— , Reference to "Geology of the Catoctln Belt" by 27, 196 

use of term Phoenix by 29, 351 

— , Report of Committee on Geological Nomenclature by 21, 29 ; 22, 5 ; 

24, 49 ; 25, 49 ; 26, 57 

Keller, H. F., Analyses of allanlte by 28, 479 

KEI.LERMAN, K. F., clted on bacterial flora of Great Salt Lake 25,59 

dentrlfylng of bacteria 28,936 

organic deposits 28, 740 

— , Photographs by 28, 944 

— , Relation of bacteria to deposition of calcium carbonate by 26, 58 

Kellog, , cited on sedimentation 28, 910 

Kellooo, Remington ; Pinnipeds from Miocene and Pleistocene deposits 

of California 29, 161 

Kellogg system of river terraces 23, 519 

Kelsey, E., Discussion of Bahla limestone plains by 21, 790 

on geologic work of ants by 21, 790 

Kelvin, Lord, clt^d on age of the sun 28, 901 

geologic climates 30, 554 

time 28,810,883 

measurement of geologic time 28, 749 

Kemp, J. F., Acknowledgments to 25, 244 

— , Augite syenite described by 27, 215 



KEMP — KEMP 151 

Page 
Kemp, J. F., Chairman and toastinaster at annual dinner of Society. . . . 24, 74 

— cited on Adirondacli glaciation 28, 548 

rocks 25, 248, 251, 254, 263 

allanite 28, 469 

anortbosite 29, 404 

beach cusps 21, 604 

classification of metamorpbic rocks '. 28, 452-458 

erosion in the Adirondacks 27, 648 

gabbro 27, 230 

glacial lakes in the Adirondacks 27, 665 

metamori)hism 28, 390 

moraines in the Adirondacks 27, 651 

origin of spheroidal forms 25, 635 

syenite and granite of Adirondacks 27, 213 

— , Deep boring near McDonald, Pennsylvania, discussed by 24,73 

— , Discussion of bornite by 25, 91 

magmatic differentiation by 25, 46 

method of representing chemical relation of a petrographic prov- 
ince by 25. 43 

New Jersey gneisses by 25, 45 

Park City minerals by 25, 48 

on geologic thermometry by 21, 32, 783 

origin of the alkaline rocks by 21, 32, 785 

pegmatite in granite of Quincy. Massachusetts, by 21, 33, 785 

present and future of natural gas fields in the northern Ap- 
palachians by 21, 34 

regional devolatilization of coal by 21, 33 

— elected First Vice-President 24, 9 

— ; Further light on the gorge of the Hudson 21, 21, 760 

— , Geologic section of the Panama Canal Zone discussed by 24, 74 

— , Meeting of Group C, third section, called to order by 25, 43, 73, 90 

— ; Memorial of J. D. I^ing. 30, 37 

— , Mexico gulf coast petroleum fields discussed by 24, 73 

— , New point in geology of the Adirondacks 25, 47 

— , Observations at the Kilauea Crater discussed by 24, 707 

— ; Pre-Cambrian of Sweden, with comments on American taxonomic 

parallels 182, 55, 719 

— , Physiography of the Adirondacks, Reference to 22, 180 

— , Referent*e by R. Ruedemauu to 27, 650 

to speech at dinner by 25, 80 

— , Report of delegates to the International Geological Congress (oral) 

by 22, 62 

— , Thanks rendered to 27, 644 

— , Toastmaster at annual dinner 21, 28 

— , F. M. Van Tuyl introduced by 25, 66 

— , Vote of thanks offered, seconded by 21, 34 

— and Newland, D. H., quoted on courses of Hudson, Schroon, and 

Sacandaga rivers 22, 177 



152 J. STANLEY-BROWN INDEX TO VOLUMES 21 TO 30 

Page 
Kemp, J. F., and Ruedemann, R., quoted on geology of Elizabethtown 

and Port Henry quadrangles 82, 152 

Kenai flora of Alaska ; Arthur HoUick 22, 91 

— peninsula and Prince William Sound, Alaska, Tidewater glaciers of.. 

21,20.757 

Kendall, P. F., Reference to Moel Tryfaen fossils collected by 25, 211 

Kennedy, William, cited on Coastal Plain oil fields 28, 578 

— , Reference to work in Texas of 26, 164 

{Kentucky and Miami rivers, Preglacial 25, 85 

— , Chester group in 27, 156 

— , Coal beds in southeastern 29. 96 

— , Edmonson County, Underground caverns of 21, 331 

— , Faulting in '. . . . 27. 101 

— , Mississippian section in 27, 155 

— , Natural bridge across Swifts Camp Creek, near Campton 21, 315 

at Natural Bridge station, Powell County 21, 324. 325 

— . Oil development in 28, 624 

Kebb. W. C, cited on allanite 28, 477 

— , State Geologist of North Carolina : . . . 25, 160 

— , Work on cotton reports of 25, 176 

Kettles in the Connecticut Valley, Glacial 25, 232 

Kew, W. S. W. ; Echinoderms of the San Pablo 25, 152 

— ; Geologic range and evolution of the more important Pacific Coast 

echinoids 29, 164 

— ; Geology of a portion of the Santa Ynez River district, Santa Barbara 

County, California 26,401 

— introduced by A. C. Lawson : 26, 401 

— ; Recent additions to our knowledge of California Cenozoic echinoids 28, 226 
— ; Tertiary mollusks and Echinoderms from the vicinity of Tuxpan, 

Mexico • 28, 224 

— and Stoner, R. C. ; Monterey series on the south side of Mount Diablo, 

California '. 24. 129 

Keweenaw fault ; Alfred C. Lane 27, 93 

Keweenawan fault, New light on the 24, 76, 718 

Keyes, C. R. ; Certain so-called meteoric irons of Canyon Diablo 24, 54, 

677, 685 

— cited on allanite 28, 475 

"latan" ( Kickai)oo) limestone 28, 421 

intermont desert plains 21, 571 

— ; Coon butte and meteoric falls of the desert 21, 24. 773 

— ; Corrasive efficiency of natural sandblast 26, 63 

— ; Deflation and the relative efficiencies of erosional processes under 

conditions of aridity , 21, 565-598 

— ; Desert regolith and its genetic relations to maximum epirotic depo- 
sition 27, 57 

— , Eolation under the stimulus of aridity by 21, 20, 565-598 

— : Erosive potential of desert waters 25, 88 

— ; Faceted form of a collapsing geoid 29, 76 



KBYES — KINDLE 153 

Page 
Keyes, C. R., False fault-scarps of desert ranges 26. 65 

— ^ Geographic cycle in an arid climate: should Its development be by 

wind' or water 23, 49, 537-562 

— ; Geotectonic adaptation through retardation of the earth's rotation. . 30; 87 

— ; Magnitude of continental deposits 24, 54, 677 

— ; Measure of arid erosion 26, 404 

— ; Mechanics of laccollthic intrusion 29, 75 

— ; Memorial of G. C. Broadhead 30, 13 

— ; Mid-Continental eolation, by 22, 54, 687 

— ; Orographic origin of ancient Lake BonneylUe 28, 164, 351 

— ; Relations of present profiles and geologic structures in desert ranges 

21, 543-563 
— ; Toyalan^ and Lucero : their structure and relations to other plateau 

plains of the desert 23, 50, 713-718 

Keyseb, Petbb, cited on allanite 28, 471 

KiBBE, A. S., cited on measurement of Niagara Falls 27, 78 

— , Survey of Niagara Falls In 1890 by 21, 442 

Kick, , cited on experimental geology 29, 175 

Kicking Horse River, near Field, British Columbia, Natural bridge 

across 21, 321 

KiLAVEA. Crater, Preliminary report of certain physical and physico- 
chemical observations at the ; Arthur L. Day 24, 74, 573-603, 707 

— , Drop-fault crater ; G. C. Curtis 26, 77 

— in action, Observations on 25, 80 

— lava. Tables of analyses of 24, 586 

— , Presence of water in the unaltered lava gases of 26, 375 

— , Review of history of 28, 269 

— volcanic material, Chemical study of 24, 584 

KiLAUEAN vent, Temperature of 21, 112 

KiMBAix, H. H., cited on light 30, 549 

Kimball, J. P., Segregation of iron ores first applied by 23, 321 

KiXDERHOOKiAN age of the Chattanoogan series; E. O. Ulrich 26,96,155 

— , Stratigraphy and faunas of Lower 29, 93 

Kindle, E. M., Acknowledgmentfi to 29, 330 

— ; Bottom control of the composition of marine faunas as illustrated by 

dredging in the Bay of Fundy 27, 160 

— cited on Cambrian fossils from Alaska 26, 193 

Chemmig concretions 28, 325 

coral fauna 27, 478 

Devonian limestone of Alaska ^ 26, 192 

experiments in deposition 28, 803 

geology of Saskatchewan 30, 3^7 

Ithaca fauna 30, 4QQ 

Jefferson limestone of the Wasatch region 21, 537 

marine Clinton beds 29, 334 

Medina formation 26, 287 

Middle Triasslc rocks of Alaska 27, 690 

Nation ,River formation of Alaska 26, 199 



154 J. STANLEY-BROWN INDEX TO VOLUMES 21 TO 30 

Page 

Kindle, E. M., cited on Silurian formations 28* 808 

upi>er Devonian shales and cherts of Alaska 25, 196 

— ; Deformation of unconsolidated beds in Nova Scotia and southern 

Ontario 28, 163, 323 

— ; Diagnostic characteristics of marine elastics 28, 162, 207, 905 

— , Discussion of Hamilton group of western New York by 26, 113 

— , Geological work on Porcupine River by 25, 180 

— ; Note on a process of fossilization in the Paleozoic Lycopods 24, 115 

— ; Notes on the separation of salt from saline water and mud 20, 80 

— , Reference to samples of Rhipldomella, obtained by 21, 299 

"The f aunal succession in the Port Clarence limestone, Alaska," 

of 27, 690 

section at Cape Thompson, Alaska, of 27, 704 

— ; Separation of salt from saline water and mud 29, 471 

-^, Silurian and Devonian limestones in the Bear River range identified 

by 21, 519 

— and Bbooks,. A. H., Reference to "Paleozoic and associated rocks on 

the upper Yukon, Alaska," of 27, 701 

King, Ci-abence, cited on age of the earth 28, 839 

basin ranges 21, 548 

measurement of geologic time 28, 749 

the Laramie. 25, 338 

Uinta group 25, 417 

King, W. B. R., cited on war geology 30, 170 

King, W. W., Reference to *'The uppermost Silurian and Old Red Sand- 
stone of South Staffordshire" by 27, 367 

Kingston, Tennessee, Reference to limestone region of 21, 331 

KiBK, C. T. ; Certain structural features in the coal fields of New Mexico 

26, 405 

— introduced by C. K. Leith 26, 405 

Kirk, Edwin; An Ordovician fauna from southeastern Alaska 29,143 

— ; Paleozoic glaciation in southeastern Alaska : 29, 149 

Kirk, W. D., Acknowledgment for courtesies by 30, 584 

KiRKFiELD, Ontario, Head of Trent Valley at 2I, 229 

Kirkland iron ore 29, 349 

KiRKPATRiCK, R., cited on morphology of Merlia 26, 364 

KiRUNA, Sweden, Origin of the iron ores at 26, 99 

KiTTANNiNO (Lower) coal. Unusual distortion of, by Richard R. Hice. . 

22, 54, 716 

KizHNER, , Theory of 28, 728 

Kjerulf, Th. ; Oeologie von Norwegen, Reference to. 22, 130, 140, 144, 145, 158 

Kline and Son, John, Analysis of Chagrin shales given by 2I, 772 

Knab, Frederick, cited on phosphorescent termites 2I, 491 

Knapp, I. N., cited on structure of oil fields 28, 583 

Knappen, R. S., cited on war geolog>' 30, 171 

Knight, C. R., Reference to restorations by 26, 142 

sculptural work of 25, 407 

Knight, C. W., cited on Canada oil fields 28, 723 



KNIGHT — KNOWLTON 155 

I^age 
Knight, C. W., and Miller, Wiillet G. ; The pre-Cambrian of south- 
eastern Ontario 22, 55 

; Revision of pre-Canibrian (fhxssiflcation in Ontario 26, 87 

Knight, S. H. ; Age and origin of the Red Beds of southeastern Wyo- 
ming 28, 168 

— cited on glacial bauds 27, 113 

Morrison formation 29, 255 

stratigraphy of the Red Beds 28,802 

— ; Lithogenesis and stratigraphy of the Red Beds of southeastern Wyo- 
ming 27, 120 

— , Reference to war work of 30, 179 

Knight, W. C, cited on Morrison formation 29, 253 

Red Beds 27, 120 

Knopf, Adolph ; Platinum-gold lode dei)osit in southern Nevada 26, 85 

— and MoFFiT, F. H., Reference to ''Mineral resources of the Nanesna- 

White River district, Alaska/' of 27, 696 

Knott, C. G., Relation of si)ee<l of transmission to location of paths of 

Yakutat Bay eartluiuakes analyzed by 21, 393 

Knowlton, F. H., Acknowledgments to 25, 356 

— appointed on Board of Control 30, 146 

— cited on absence of dinosaurs in the Ljiramie 25, 400 

coral 27, 85 

flora of the Puerco formation 26, 382 

Fort Union flora 25, 349 

fossils from Edmonton formation 25, 366-367, 375 

Morrison formation 29, 260 

Lance flora 25,396 

Mesozoic and Cenozoic floras 27, 465 

unconformity l>etween l4iramie and Lance 25, 401 

— ; Climates of the past, Presidential address by 30, 151 

— ; Comparison of the Cretaceous floras of California with those of 

other Cretaceous areas 26, 414 

— ; Correlation of the Miocene floras of western United States with 

those of other Miocene areas 26, 416 

— ; Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary in the Rocky Mountain region 25,325 

— , Discussion of symposium papers by 25, 130 

— elected Third Vice-President Paleontological Society 21, 72 

— ; Evolution of ge<-)logic climates 30, 469 

— , Identiflcation of fossils from Ojo Alamo beds of 25, 379 

— ; Laramie flora of southwestern Wyoming 21, 75 

— ; Memoir of W J McGee 24, 18 

— ; New generic type of fossil fern from the American Tertiary 22, 91 

— ; Opening of Paleontological Society meeting by 30, 144 

— presided at morning session of Paleontological Society, December 30, 

1915 27, 155 

— ; Principles governing the use of fossil plants in geologic correlation 27,525 
flora from Lance formation 25, 350, 351 

— quoted on Salitre limestones of Bahia 22, 189 



156 J. STANLEY-BROWN ^INDEX TO VOLUMES 21 TO 30 

Pafce 

Knowlton, F. II., quoted on the flora of the Raton field 23, 604 

— , Reference to investigations by 25, 322 

— , Relation of vertebrate fauna in Red Beds between Wichita Falls, 

Texas, and Las Vegas, New Mexico, discussed by 24, 52 

— ; Relations between the Mesozoic floras of North and South America . . 

29. 129, 607 
— ; Remarks on the fossil turtles accredited to the Judith River forma- 
tion 22, 95 

— , Shinarump conglomerate discussed by 24, 52 

— , Sketch of Fontaine's paleobotanical work by 25, 8 

— ; Some interesting new plants from Florissant, Colorado 23, 88 

Knoxville beds of the San Jos^ and Mount Hamilton quadrangles, 

Thickness of 24, 96 

KoENiG, G. A., cited on allanite 28, 477 

melanochalcite 27, 61 

KoENiGSBEBGEB, J., cited ou metamorphlsm 28, 413 

KoppEN, W., cited on sun-spots* relation to solar heat 25, 487-488, 492 

K0KE17, E., Correspondent of the Paleontological Society, Death reported 

of 24, 102 

Kola peninsula, Nephellte syenite "laccolith*' of the area of 21, 90 

Kootenai formation. Age of 26, 338 

— invertebrate fauna 26, 345 

KooTENAY formation of Alberta Cretaceous 27, 677 

— Valley, British Columbia, New species of Ficus from the interglacial 

deposits of the 26, 159 

KoBNEBUP, A., Geologiska lagttagelser fra Vestksysten af Gr5nland, 

Reference to 22, 131, 133 

KosT, J., Geological work in Florida of 25, 175 

KoYUKUK-KoBUK regiou, Alaska 23, 563-566 

Kozu, S., cited on Stromboli 28, 251 

Krafla volcano, Iceland 26, 258 

Kramm, H. E. ; Serpentines of the central coast ranges of California. . 21, 793 

Kbanz, W., Military geology by 30, 168 

Kbasser, E., cited on Tertiary floras •., 29, 634 

— ; Composition of bornite and its relation to other sulfo-minerals 25, 90 

Kbaus, E. H., elected member of Auditing Committee 23, 2 

— , Reference to class names of crystals used by 21, 732 

— ; Variation of the optic angle of gypsum with temperature 23, 37, 726 

— and Hunt, W. F. ; Variable composition of melanochalcite 27, 61 

Kbejci, J., and Feistmantei^ K. ; The fault system of the Silurian basin 

in central Bohemia, Reference to 22, 161 

Kbenkel, E., cited on fossils from African Tendaguru 29, 275 

Khopatkin, p., cited on climatic changes in Asia 25, 480 

Kbummel, Orro, cited on sea dt i)osits 28, 738 

KuMMEL, H. B., cited on New Jersey trap sheet 25, 623 

origin of pillow lavas 25, 639 

Silurian formation, New Jersey " 27, 543 

— , Delta deposits discussed by 23, 48, 745 



KUMMEL — LAKE 157 

Page 
Kl'MMEX, H. B., Secretary (first four papers) Stratlgraphic and Paleon- 

tologic Section 21, 30 

— , Stability of the Atlantic coast discussed by 23, 49, 741 

— , Strati^aphic study of the Appalachian and Central States with ref- 
erence to the occurrence of oil and gas discussed by 23, 37 

KULI.MEB, C. J., cited on cyclones 26, 83 

— ; Charts of storminess during sun-spot maximum 25, 504-500 

— , Compilation of storms by 25, 496-497 

— . Law of shift of storm track by .* 25. 502-503 

KuNz, G. F., cited on allanite 28, 467 

Jasper agate 25, 472 

— ; Gem-bearing pegmatites of the world 22, 67 

— ; John Boyd Thacher Park: the Helderberg escarpment as a geolog- 
ical park 26, 110 

— , Memorial of Albert Smith Bickmore by 26, 18 

Kurtz, F., cited on Argentine flora 29, 632, 647 

fossils ; 29, 611 

Kynaston, H., cited on metamorphism 28, 402 

L 

Laboratory viewpoint. Some mineral relations from ; Arthur L. Day. . . . 

21, 141-178 

— work, Some reasons for accurate 21, 143 

Labrador coast, Uplift of 29, 226 

— glacier older than Keewatin 25, 212 

Labrador-Newfoundland Paleozoic sect ion 22, 96 

Labradorite porphyry dikes of Diamond Hill-Cumberland district.... 25,452 

Labvrinthodont from the Newark series ; W. J. Sinclair 28, 213 

Laccoltthic intrusion. Mechanics of 29, 75 

Lacroix, Alfred, cited on allanite 28, 466, 484 

Stromboli 28, 267 

war geology 30, 171 

Lacustrine theory of Great Plains deposits. Objections to 22, 710 

Laflamme, J. C. K., Memoir of , 22, 4 

— , Resolution relating to Canadian Forestry School and the late 22,62 

rocks of Bellingham series 25, 448 

La Forge, Laurence, cited on tillites in North America 27, 185 

I^ooMORPHS, American Tertiary 27, 169 

Lagrange, E., Reference to seismographic studies on Alaskan earth- 
quakes 21, 375 

Laiiee, F. H., cited on metamon^hism 28, 396 

in Diamond Hill -Cumberland district 25, 445 

riebecklte granite 25, 470 

rocks of Rattlesnake Hill 25, 476 

Lake Agassiz basin. Earth -movements in 25, 34 

, Beginnings of 24, 71,697 

, Records of 28, 145 



158 J. STANLEY-BROWN INDEX TO VOLUMES 21 TO 3O 

Lake Aoassiz, Reference to shoreline of 25, 209 

, Summary of the history ol* 21, 422 

— Algonquin, Battlefield and Fort Brady beaches of 26, 69 

— Bonneville, Orographic origin of 28, 164, 351 

— Chelan, Washington, Effect of Alaskan earthquakes on 21, 342 

— Erie glacial phenomena 25, 207, 208 

region, Crustal movements in 26, 66 

— George depression and eastward, .Drainage of 22, 180 

— Iditarod region of Alaska 27, 114 

— Iroquois, Age of 25, 207 

— Lahontan, Origin of the tufas of 26, 392 

— Maumee, in Ohio ; Frank Carney 22, 65, 726 

— Michigan, Abandoned beaches about the south end of 29, 235 

, Elevated beaches of 28, 142 

glacial phenomena 25, 207, 208 

— Mlnnewanka, or Devils Lake, Alberta, Location of 24, 233 

, Permian, Pennsylvanlan, Mississlppian, and Devonian formations 

along 24, 233 

— Missoula, Glacial 25, 87 

— Ontario, Lowering of 27, 79 

— Placid quadrangle. Geology of 29, 428 

~ region. Present stability of 24. 226 

— regions, No late earth-movements in the 24, 227 

— shore deposits. Effect of rapid offshore deepening on 23, 50, 746 

— Superior land district, Foster and Whitney report on geology of 23,317 

region. Glacial investigations in the 21, 21, 762 

,Pillow lavas of 25,612 

— Warren, Reference to 25, 207, 208 

Lakepobt limestone 29, 353 

Lakes, Central Adirondacks glacial 27, 645 

— Algonquin and Iroquois, Maps of 21, 230 

— and channels near Syracuse, Glacial 21, 21, 761 

— in the Oberlin quadrangle, Ohio, Shorelines of the glacial 21, 21, 762 

— of Asia Minor and Syria, Post-Tertiary historj- of 21, 20, 7.55 

— Superior, Michigan, Huron, and Erie, Niagara limestone and 24,232 

Lamansky, W., cited on faunas of I^ower Ordoviclc 27, 596-598 

species of Orthidie 27, 593-595 

studies of Esthonia 27,590 

Lamarck, Jean, cited on evolution 27, 492 

Lambdotherium zone in the Big Iloi-n basin, Wyoming 22, 95 

Lambe, L. M., cited on trachodont skull from Belly River beds 25,380 

Laminated lake clays of Lake Bascom 27, 81 

Lamville River, Vermont, Natural bridge over 2I, 322 

Lamplugh. G. W., cited on inter-Glacial eimch 25, 213 

— ; Geology of the Zambesi basin around the Batoka gorge. Reference 

to 22, 138 

Lampson Hall, Yale University, Meetings of Society held in 24, 2 



LAMPTON ^LANE 159 

Page 
Lampton, W. J., Report of Alaskan earthquake of 1899 to New York Sun 

by 21. 364 

Lance and Hell Creek beds, Synchronous 25, 380 

Laramie. T^nconformlty between 26t 401 

-- Creek beds 25, 325 

— fauna compared with other faunas 25, 387 

— formation 25, 320, 325 

assigned to the Cretaceous 25, 353 

, Continuity of 25, 330 

— formation, Correlation of the 25, 334 

. Difficulty of correlating the 25, 396 

, Distrilmtion, character, and development of 25, 348-353 

, Flora of the 25, 331-334 

, Fossils from the 25, 352 

, Marine member of 25, 350 

— forms, Technical explanatory treatment of 23, 103 

— model, the "last word in geology," Naturalistic 26, 79 

Land, Rer)eating patterns in the relief and in the structure of ; William 

Herbert Hobbs 22, 54, 123-176 

— uplift in relation to ice-body, Reference by H. L. Fairchild to 27, 249 

I^XDSCAPES, (Character profiles in 22, 124 

— , Oifferent orders of spa(*e units 22, 128 

— , Relief patterns in 22, 124 

— . Spac^e units in profiles 22, 127 

••Landslides in the San Juan Mountains," Reference to paper of Ernest 

Howe on 21, 664 

— in unconsolidated sediments ; David N. Newland 27, 58 

Landsups and laminated lake clays in the basin of Lake Bascom; 

Frank B. Taylor 27, 81 

— in the Philippines 28, 537 

T^NDSPHEBE, Figure showing relation of Greenland to other sections.. 21,209 
Lane, A. C. ; Can U-shaped valleys be produced by removal of talus. . . . 26, 75 

— cited on allanite 28, 469 

aridity Ib Lake Erie region 21, 653 

article on rpi)er Siluric strata 27, 72 

chemical denudation 28, 836 

determination of geologic time 28, 841 

Lynn Beach cusps 21, 600 

metamorphism 28, 414 

— , Classification of marine deposits discussed by. .* 24, 74 

— , Climatic investigations on geological theories discusse<l by 24, 70 

— ; Connate waters of the Atlantic <*oa8t 21, 24, 774 

— ; Dark scale of hardness 23, 37, 725 

— , Deep boring near McDonald, Pennsylvania, discussed by 24, 73 

— ; Demonstration of relative refraction 23, 37, 725 

— , Discussion of geological education of engineers by 28, 138 

Mississippi delta by 28, 151 

on flowing wells on anticlines by 21, 24, 770 



160 J. STANLEY-BROWN INDEX TO VOLUMES 21 TO 30 

FacB 

Lane, A. C, r>iscussion on K^ologio thermometry by 21» 32 

types of sand grains by 21, 25, 776 

— , Effusive and Intrusive in the quantitative classification 26, 43 

— , "Geological Song Book'* compiled by 21, 28 

— ; Keweenaw fault 27, 93 

— , Memorial of Charles A. Davis by 28, 14 

— , New classification of natural water discussed by 24. 73 

light on the Keweena wan fault 24, 76, 718 

— , Objects and methods of petrographic description discussed by 24, 76 

— , Observations at the Kilauea Crater discussed by 24, 74 

— ; Origin of granites as well as metacrystals by selective solution — a 

recantation 24, 73, 704 

— , Paragenesis of the zeolites discussed by 23. 38, 727 

— , Referencie to "The geology of Nahant'* written by 21, 600 

— , Remarks on calcium carbonate by 27, 49 

conglomerate and breccia by 27, 93 

Detroit River series by 27, 77 

Montana phosphate deposits by 27, 63 

Ohio Dunkard series 27, 88 

Pacific Islands 27, 49 

— ; Specific weight of drill cores 27, 49 

— , Stability of the Atlantic coast discussed by 23, 49, 741 

Lane, Secretary, Service of Department's engineers outlined by 30,402 

LANB5Y, F. B., Watson, T. L., and Mebbiix, G. P., cited on unakite 27,220 

Lanq, , cited on geyser action 29, 185 

Lang, H. O., cited on akerite 27, 207 

Lano, W. D., of the British Museum, cited on Merlia normani Kirk- 

Patrick 26, 364 

Langdon, D. W., Geological work in Florida by 25, 174 

of 25, 171 

Lange, Ebich, cited on Tendaguru series 29, 264 

Lanojokuu^, Iceland, Remnants of ice-caps in 21. 718 

Langudy, S. p., cited on earth's heat sources 30, 540 

Langton, Daniel W., Jr., Death announced by Secretary. . . .«i 21, 4 

— , Memoir (with bibliography) ; E. A. Smith 21. 12-16 

Laplace cited on Isostasy 26, lt3 

Laplace's functions and the figure of the earth, Reference to 26, 178 

— memoir on the figure of the earth. Summary of his mathematical 

analysis quoted from 26, 173 

Lappabent, a. de, cited on classification of later Jurassic sediments fol- 
lowing Oxfordian 26, 347 

Island subsidence .'^ 29. 493 

metamorphism 28, 379, 381 

monoclines 27. 91 

monzonite 27, 204 

Tertiary floras 29, 634 

the Montien of Belgium 25, 394 

Lapwobth, C, cited on classification of Silurian 27, 558 



LAPWORTH LAWSON 161 

Page 

I^pwoBTH, C, cited on graptolite shales » 28, 958 

— , Reference to "On the Ballantree rocks of south Scotland and their 

place in the Upland Sequence" of 27, 575 

Labamte and Lance, Unconformity between 26, 401 

— flora of southwestern Wyoming ; K. H. Knowlton 21, 75 

— formation and the Raton Mesa region 24, 114 

*' — " formation ( ?) , Colorado and New Mexico 23, 607 

. Flora of the , 26, 331-333 

•* — ?*' I*uerco and Torrejon in the San Juan basin, New Mexico; W. J. 

Sinclair 26, 138 

— unconformity in the Denver basin 26, 347 

Laboe rock slide in the Wind River Mountains of Wyoming; E. B. 

Branson 28, 149 

Labsen, E. S., cited on allanite 28, 480 

rock specimens 27, 199 

Lassen Peak, California, Recent eruptions of ; J. S. Diller 26, 105 

, eruptions of May 20-22, 1915, Characteristics of the ; R. S. Holway 

and J. S. Diller » 26, 397 

Las Vegas, New Mexico, and Wichita Falls, Texas, Relation of verte- 
brate fauna in Red Beds between 24, 52, 679 

Late Misslssippian orogenlc movements in North America ; F. M. Van 

Tuyl and R. C. Moore 30, 88 

— Pleistocene shoreline in Maine and New Hampshire; F. J. Katz.... 20,74 

— Precambrian deserts 27, 182 

ice age 27, 186 

I^TEB Tertiary formations of western Nebraska ; W. D. Matthew 28. 197 

I-.ATEST theories regarding the origin of oil ; D. White 28, 157, 727 

Laubentian Ice-lKKly of Adiix>uda(*ks 27, 647 

— ( Jjabradorian ) ice-lxKly, Limitx, thickness, movement, and recession 

in New York State of the 24, 135-137 

I*AVA, Explanation of the formation of Aa * 24, 509 

— flows, Region of Toylan^ and Lucero 23, 716 

— from Kilauea and Ilalemaumau craters, Analyses tables of 24,586 

— of Starks Knob, Position of 24, 347 

— province, British East Africa 23,304 

Lavas and sedimentaries of Kittitas County, Washington, Relation be- 
tween the Tertiary 26, 137 

— ( Brun ) , Explosive 24, 601 

— of Hawaii and their relations ; Whitman Cross 24, 54, 684 

Laws governing sedimentation 26, 732-737 

Lawson, a. C, Acting Chairman Summer Meeting, Session August 4, 

1915 26, 393 

— , Attention called to work of W. F. Jones in the Coalinga region by. 24, 129 

— , J. P. Bulwada introduced by 26, 403 

— cited on anorthoslte 29, 409 

California chert formations 28, 831 

erosion of Kern River country 27, 46 

magmatic assimilation 26, 261 

XI — Bull. Geol. Soc. Am. 



162 J. STAXLEY-BROWX INDEX TO VOLUMES 21 TO 30 

Page 

Lawson, a. C, cited on origin of pillow lavan 25, 653 

pillow lavas 25, 611 

revolution of Sierra Ne\ adas : 27, 508 

Seine conglomerate 27, 188 

spheroidal basalts and diabases 25, 619 

thorium-lead 28, 877 

— , Coal resources of (^hina discussed by 24, 03 

— , Discussion of Coast Range glaciation by 25, 121 

colloidal migration in ore deiwsits by 26, 394 

(Jreat Basin deformations by 25, 122 

limestone plains of the interior of Bahla by 21. 790 

physiographic control in the Philippines by 26, 396 

progressive chan<?e in mineral composition of coi»i)er ores by.. 26,395 

Santa Barbara County stratification by 21, 792 

the sedimentaries and lavas by 26, 137 

term "bajada" by 26. 391 

Tertiary rocks of Oahu by 26, 134 

Washington coal-l»earing Eocene by 25, 122 

-- elected Chairman of Cordilleran Se<'tion 21, 790 ; 23, 70 

temporary Chairman of Cordilleran Section 25, 120 ; 26, 130 

— , Eocene of San Pedro Point, California, discussed by 24, 126 

the Coalinga-Cantua district, California, discussed by 24, 127 

— ; Epigene profiles of the desert 26, 391 

— , Establishment by Congress of a National Bureau of Seismology pro- 

I)osed by 21, 794 

— , Excursions of California Meeting of 1915 conducted w- holly and in 

part by 26, 407, 417 

— ; Fanglomerate, a detrital rock at Battle Mountain, Nevada 23, 72 

— , Faulting in the Great Basin dis(*us8ed by 26, 139 

— , First session of Cordilleran Section called to order by Chairman... 24,92 

— , Fluting of crystalline rocks in the tropics discussed by 24.94 

— , Geology of Steej) Rock Lake by 23, 36, 722 

the Nevada Hills 23, 74 

— ; Geomorphogeny of the Tehachapi Valley system, Reference to.... 22,153 

— , W. S. W. Kew introduced by 26, 401 

— , Miocene of the southern Coast Range region of California discussed 

by 23, 72 

— , Nomenclature of Faults discussed by 23, 74 

— ; The oldest fossils 24, 97 

— , On (Committee on the Nomenclature of Faults 24. 163 

— , Orthoclase as a vein mineral discussed by 23, 72 

— , Questions on the Pleistocene of western Washington raised by 26, 131 

— quoted on Nicaraguan Tertiary rocks 23. 509-514 

— ; Secticm of the Shinarump 23, 74 

— , Structure of the Sierra Nevada be<lrock complex discussed by 24,98 

— ; Twentieth Annual Rei>ort of the (Jeological and Natural History Sur- 
vey of Minnesota, Reference to 22, 149 

— , H. O. Wood introduced by 26,403 



LAUNAY LEHMANN 163 

PnRp 

I^Ai'NAY, Louis de, Annales des Mines, Reference to 22, 120 

— , Tertiary rift placed by 21, 209 

LArBENTiAjf granite, Occurrence of 21, 683 

Lea, Isaac, cited on amphlliian footprints 27, 411 

— . Geological work of 25, 100, 161 

Lead, Accumulation of 28, 849 

— dei>ositH in Missouri, Genesis of 29» 86 

Leavks collected from the Dawson arkose. List of 23, 273 

Lebedew, N. von, cited on Russian fauna 27, 77 

Le Conte, Joseph, Bibliography of 26, 54 

— cited on the Shastan Sea 27, 508 

— , Geological work in Florida of 25, 174 

— , Memorial of 26, 47 

— , Photograph of 26, 47 

Le Conte Geological Club, Annual dinner of the Cordilleran Section in 

conjunction with the Paleontological and Seismological Societies, 

held under the auspices of 26, 138 

, Reference to 25, 123 

— Memorial Ijodge in the Yosemite Valley, Photograph of 26, 48 

Lee, J. H., Discussion of loess by 29, 73 

— , Reference to war work of 30, 180 

Lee, Wallace, cited on war geology 30. 171 

Lee, W. T., Acknowledgments to 25, 33.') 

— cited on extension of older Cretaceous beds in New Mexico 25, 401 

Morrison fonuation 29, 247, 249, 251, 2a3 ; 30, 491 

Pennsylvanian fauna 30, 491 

the Cretaceous section 25, 329 

undulating character of Red Beds in northern New Mexico. 26,319 

— ; Correlation of rocks in the Isolated coal fields aroimd the southern 

end of the Rocky Mountains in New Mexico 23, 36, 571-686 

— , Discussion of symposium papers by 25, 130 

— , Fossiliferous conglomerates discussed by 23, 83 

— ; General stratigraphic break between Pennsjivanian and Permian in 

western America 28, 169 

— ;Tlie Morrison; an initial Cretaceous formation 26,90,151,303-314 

— ; Reasons for regarding the Morrison an introductory Cretaceous for- 
mation 26, 303-314 

— ; Relation of Cretaceous formations to the Rocky Mountains in Colo- 
rado and New Mexico 26, 114, 156 

— ; Unconformity In the so-called Laramie of the Raton coal field of New 

Mexico 22, 54, 717 

Leffingwell, E. de K., cited on upi>er Triassic rocks of Canning River, 

Alaska ? 27, 703 

— , Reference to "The Canning River region, northern Alaska," of 27, 703 

Legendbe*s law of density. Citation of 26, 173 

Lehman, , cited on stratigraphy 28, 735 

Lkhmann, J. G., cited on geologic chronology 27, 491 



164 J. STANLEY-BROWN INDEX TO VOLUMES 21 TO 30 

» 

Page 

Leidy, Joseph, cited on the f?enus XotharctttB founded by 26, 419 

— , Inadequacy of classification of dinosaurs by 25, 378 

Leighton, Morris M.. cited on post-Kansan drift 27, 118 

Leiorhymhus greenanum (I'lrich), Figure showing and description of 21,511 

Leiter, H., cited on climate of north Africa 25, 528 

LrEiTH, C. K., Acknowledgments to 28, 421 

— cited on belt terrane of British Columbia 25, 189 

classification of metamorphic rocks 28« 452-453, 457 

Keweenaw Feries 27r 94, 97 

measurement of geologic time 28, 783 

origin of oolites 29, 595 

pillow lavas 25, 638 

pillow lavas 25, 612, 616 

Precambrian geology 28, 861 

schistose character of marble 27, 441 

sedimentation 28, 784 

Wisconsin volcanic rocks 25, 253 

— , Discussion of metamorphism by 28, 127 

— ; Internationalization of mineral resources 30, 107 

— , C. T. Kirk introduced by 26, 405 

LembeRt, , cited on atomic weight of lead 28, 849 

Lemtr Xotharctu8 (Eocene), Relationship to the Adapid^e and to other 

primates of the ^ 26, 419 

Lkmuroidea, (Classification of 26, 432 

— , Observations on Adapidie and other 26, 153 

— , On the basicranial region of the 26, 426 

classification and phy logeny of the ; W. K. Gregory 26, 426 

— , Phyletic relationships of the 25, 141 

Lemurs, especially yotharctus. Relations of the Tupaiidte and of Eocene 

24. 117, 247 

— , The Indrisine or Indrisidfe 26, 440 

Length and character of the earliest interglacial beds; A. P. Coleman. 25,71 
Leonard, A. G. ; Cretaceous and Tertiarj' formations of western North 

Dakota and eastern Montana 22, 63, 722 

— ; Pleistocene drainage changes in western North Dakota 27, 80, 295 

Leperditexjjl n. sp.. Fossil of the quartzite at Geneva 21, 527 

Le Perle Creek, Wyoming, Natural bridge at 21. 320 

Lepox, L. R,, Analysis of oolitic limestone from Carahyba, Bahia, by. . 22, 190 

Lepsius, R., cited on metamorphism 28, 402 

Leptomeryx from White River Oligoc^ne 25, 145 

Lerch, Otto, Geological work in Louisiana of 25, 173 

Le Roy, O. E., cited on Coast Range bathylith 27, 509 

Lesley, J. P., cited on Pennsylvania I'recambrian ! 29, 376 

Silurian formations in New York, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania 

27, 544, ,545, ,547, 549, 550. 552 

Lesquerevx, L., cited on correlation of Raton formation 25, 333 

Cretaceous fioras 35, 375 

Letcher County, Kentucky ; Coal beds in 29, 96 



LETTER — LEWIS 165 

Page 
Letter from Warren ITphaui on records of Lake Agassiz and Ontario, , 

Canada 28, 146 

Levebett, Frank ; Beginnings of Lake Agassiz 24, 71, 697 

— cited on fossiliferous beds of Wliirli)ool drift and Scarboro Heights. 21,439 
glacial formations and drainage features of the Erie and Ohio 

basin - 21, 238 

glacial time. 29, 244 

Lake Michigan beaches 29, 235, 237 

Maumee beach deformation 27, 238, 239 

so-called lowan gladation contemporaneous with IlUnoisan . . . 26, 108 

the beach of lake Warren 21, 239 

Illinois glacial lobe 21, 237 ; 26, 70 

till overlying Birds Ilill esker gravel and sand 21, 414 

— , Discussion of Appalachian peneplains by 28, 128 

coastal subsidence by • 25, 62 

glacial deiwslts in Ontario by 25, 72 

James Bay uplift by 29. 70 

loess by 29, 73 

method of measuring i)ost-Glacial time by 28, 141 

Xebraskan and Kansan drifts by 23, 45, 735 

Pleistocene deposits by 29, 78 

records of Lake Agassiz and Ontario, Canada, by 28, 146 

— ; Karth-movemeuts in the Minnesota portion of the Lake Agassiz basin 

during and since the lake occupancy 25, 34 

— . (;iacial cirques discussed by 24, 51, 678 

formations in the western United States 28, 143 

investigations in Minnesota in 1911 23, 46, 732 

— the Lake Superior region in 1909 21,21,762 

lakes of Saginaw Basin in relation to uplift 29, 75 

— , "Hinge line" suggested by 21, 239 

— ; The lowan drift 24, 71, 698 

— , Piedmont terraces and post-Jurassic history of the northern Appa- 
lachians discussed by 24. 70 

— ; Pleistocene deposits of Minnesota and adjacent districts 27, 68 

formations and "loess" discussed by 23, 48, 739 

succession in Wisconsin, by Samuel Weidman, presented by 24, 71 

— , Post-Glacial earth movements discussed by 24, 74 

erosion and oxidation discussed by 23, 47, 738 

— quoted on departed from, horizontality in Michigan 21, 241 

uplift of Lake Erie beaches 21, 238 

— , Reference to weathered zones and till sheets described by 21, 631 

— ; Remarkable deformation of the Algonquin Beach 24, 71, 697 

— , Remarks on Kansan drift by 27, 110 

Ltxw ArousTE Michel, cited on experimental geolog>' 29, 175 

— , Memoir of, by Alexander N. Wlnchell 23, 32 

— , Reference to 21, 114 

I^wis, Elias, Jr., cited on geology of Long island 28, 282 

Lewis, J. V., cited on New Jersey trap sheet 25, 624 



166 J. STANLEY-BROWN INDEX TO VOLUMES 21 TO 30 

Lewis, J. V., Discussion of Acadian Trlassic by 26, &* 

bornite by 25,90 

■ New Jersey gneisses by 26. 45 

— , Northumberland (New Yorlt) Volcanic Plug discussed by 24, 54, 683 

— ; Origin of pillow lavas 25, 32, 591 

— ; Paragenesis of the zeolites 23, 37, 727 

— , Remarks on water as magmatlc constituent 27, 51 

— and Stose, George W.. Triassic igneous rocks in the vicinity of Gettys- 

burg, Pennsylvania 27, 55, C23 

Lewis, W. J., Reference to "The up|)ermost Silurian and Old Red Sand- 
stone of South Staffordshire" by 27. 365 

Lewis shale, Colorado and New Mexic*o 23, 607 

Lewiston shales 25, 2S5 

L1A88IC flora of the Mixteca Alta, Origin of 24, llo 

Librarian elected 21,3; 22,3; 23,2; 24,9; 

25, 9 ; 26, 11 ; 27, 11 ; 28. 12 ; 29, H 

Libyan desert, Observations on sand-blast made in; W. H. Ilobbs 26,396 

, Origin of the basins within the haniada of the 26, 396 

Lieber. O. M., State Geologist of South Carolina 25. 160 

Lime-alkali eruptions. Occurrence of 21, 89 

LiMEiiousE section, Ontario 25, 316 

Limestone. Alteration processes and products within the GrenvlUe 24,76,717 

— and granite contacts, Bleaching of 21, 33, 786 

— beds of central New York * 28, 131 

— , Rre<H>iated 27, 122 

— , Deformation of 28, 163 

— , Faunas of the (Jirardeau and Edgewood 24, 112, 358, 368 

— , Formation of Paieozolc 27. 147 

— , Foyaitic phase of the pre-Cambrian granitic batholiths found at con- 
tact with 21, 91 

— from Carahyba, Bahia, Analysis of 22, 190 

— gravel boulders. Flattening by solution of 25, 66 

— , (Jreat Lake basins In their relationship to Niagara 24, 76, 229 

— horizons of Bahia 22, 188 

— of Missouri, Glauconite in 29, 104 

— of Steep Rock series, Fossils of lower : 23, 46, 723 

the Mexican Cretaceous terranes, Tamasopa oil-l>earing 24, 255 

Vancouver Island, Sutton - 26, 82 

— or dolomite a flux for l)asalt 21, 109 

— , Ordoviclan of central Pennsylvania .' 28, 166 

— overthrusts, Wasatch range Carboniferous 21, 537 

— plains of the Interior of Bahia and the climatic changes suggested by 

them, Aggraded 22, 187 

, Brazil ; J. C. Branner 21, 790 

— quarry, Fairmont, Illinois 26, 70 

— regions, Reference to Kingston, Tennessee, and Bristol, Virginia... 21.331 

— , Sexton Creek 27, 313 

Limestones, Association with alkaline ro<'ks of 2I. 91 



LIMESTONES LITTLE 167 

' Page 

Limestones of Bahia, Crystalline, Salitre. Cretaceous, and Catlnga 

22, 189-191, 204 

, Old Catlnga 22, 201, 202 

the Alexandrian series in Missouri and Illinois 24, 111, 357-372 

— , Physical conditions under which organic and chemically precipitated 

are formed 23, 82 

Ljnck, G., cited on oolites 25, 759 

origin of oolites 25, 750 

Lincoln, A. T., cited on allanite 28, 492 

Lincoln formation in Washington, Stratigraphic and faunal relations 

of the 26, 169 

LiND, S. C, and Wiiittimore, C. F., cited on hehavior of certain radio- 
active minerals 26, 195 

LiNDE, J. G. ; Reference to studies on the joint system of 22, 143 

LiNDGREN, Waldemar, Ahstract of address of retiring President G. F. 

Becker read by 26, 86 

— , Chairman of meeting December 30, First Vice-President 26, 87 

— cited on bathyliths on the Pacific coast 27, 509 

granodiorite 27, 204 

metamorphism 28, 384 

monzonite analyses 27, 206 

— , Meeting of December 29 called to order by First Vice-President 26, 5 

— , Remarks on natural gas at Cleveland, Ohio, by 26, 103 

revision of pre-Cambrian classification in Ontario by 26, 88 

— spoke at annual dinner 26, 104 

Lineaments, Definition of 22, 143 

— , Relation to joints and faults 22, 144 

— , Varied expression of 22, 143 

LingulidiHcina utahengis, Fossil of Wasatch region '. 21, 530 

LiNN.cus, Carl, cited on Paleozoic organic remains near liabtick 27, 585 

Linnarsson, G., Reference to "Om Vestergiitlands Cambriska och Silu- 

riska aflagringar'* of 27, 586 

Lister, Martin, Reference to work of 29, 172 

Litchfield, Maine, Field relations in 29, 99 

LiTCHFiELDiTE and soda-syenites from Maine 29, 463 

— , Relation to soda-syenite of 29, 99 

LiTHOGENESTS and stratigraphy of the Red Be<ls of southeastern Wyo- 
ming ; S. H. Knight 27, 120 

LiTHoiDAL rhyolite, Yellowstone natural bridge composed of 21, 322 

I^THOLOGic changes, Differences in fauna not discounted for by 21, 289 

LiTHOPUVS.E and surface markings, Iceland 26, 255 

Little, George, Geological work in Georgia by 25, 174 

Mississippi of 25, 170 

Little, H. P. ; Pleistocene and post-Pleistocene geology of Waterville, 

Maine 28, 167, 309 

Little Missouri lower valley, I»ostglacial age of 27, 302 

River, Preglacial valley of 27, 300 

tributaries, Abnormal drainage of 27, 301 



168 J. STANLEY-BROWN INDEX TO VOLUMES 21 TO 30 

Pagp 
Livingston beds of central Montana, Stratigraphic relations of the 21, 31. 781 

— formation of Montana 25, 346 

Lloyd, E. R., cited on CannonbnII formation 25, 339 

geology of Indian reservations 25, 350, 351 

LoBECK, A. K. ; Block diagrams of State physiography 26, 77 

— introduced by E. O. Hovey 26, 77 

— ; Position of the New England upland in the White Mountains 27, 108 

Local glaciation in Catskill Mountains discussed by J. W. Goldthwait. . 

28, 133, 136 

U. S. Lull 28,136 

J. L. Rich 28,133 

Frank B. Tajlor 28,133 

— glaciers in Vermont discussed bj" G." D. Hubbard 28, 135 

J. L. Rich 28, 135 

G. F. Wright 28, 135 

LiocKPOBT-GuELPH sectiou discussed by Marjorie O'Connell 28, 173 

M. Y. Williams 28, 173 

in the barge canal at Rochester, New York ; George Halcott 

Chadwick 28, 172 

— section 25, 307 

LocKYEE, W. J. S., cited on cyclonic storms 25. 524 

solar activity 28, 825 

LoEL, W. F. ; Vaqueros formation in Calif ornit^ 29, 165 

IjOESS, a lithological term ; B. Shimek 23, 48, 738 

— . Chart of distribution of 25, 575 

L0E8S-DKPO8ITING winds in the Louisiana region ; F. V. Emerson 29, 79 

— discussed by W. H. Bucher 29, 73 

A. R. Crook 29, 73 

J. n. I^es 29, 73 

Frank Leverett 29, 73 

— J. L. Rich 29, 73 

— In the Mississippi Valley 27, 82 

— , Mechanical analysis of 25, 728 

— , Present status of the problem of origin of 29, 73 

Loewinson-Lkssing, F., cited on dis(2Ussion of alkaline rocks. 21, 88 

niagmatic differentiation 25, 260 

— quoted on views given at Saint Petersburg Congress 21, 117 

— , Word "syntectics" adopted from 21, 90 

LciwL, F"., cited on metanwrphism 28, 403 

Logan, Sir W. E., cited on amphibian footprints 27, 410 

Attawapiskat coral reef 30, 368 

— r Cabots Head section, Ontario , 25, 319 

Carboniferous rocks 30, 553 

Clinton basal shale 29, 331 

Dundas section, Ontario 25, 315 

(Jasp^ Peninsula rocks 28, 325 

Hamilton section, Ontario 25, 313 

oil in igneous rocrks 28, 592 



LOGAN — LOUDERBACK 169 

Page 
Logan, Sib W. E., cited on thickness of Chazy and Black River forma-. 

tions of the Mingan series 21, 688 

' Thorold section, Ontario 25, 310 

undulations of Paleozoic rocks, Canadian side Saint Lawrence 

River 26, 287 

white quartzite 27, 560-570 

— ; Geology of Canada, 1863, Reference to 23, 371 

— quoted on composition of strata between Mingan and Antlcosti islands 

21,682 

dip of the Mingan Island rejrion 21, 681 

Mingan Island phenomena 21, 686 

— , Reference to stratigraphy of the Mingan and Anticostl sections of. . 21, 681 
Logan, W. N., cited on Morrison formation 29, 254. 

— quoted on correlation of Morrison with Wealden fauna 26, 344 

liOMAs, James, cited on continental deiwsits 28, 742 

London basin. Cretaceous 25, 336 

Long Island, Altitudes of shore features of 29, 208 

. Geological bibliography of 28. 307, 308 

, Marine fossil from 25, 242 

submergence of 28, 279 

, Post-Glacial submergence of 28, 142 

IjOng-jawed mastodon skeleton from South Dakota and phylogeny of the 

Proboscidea ; II. F. Osborn 29, 133 

Long Rapids shale 30, 377 

Long WOOD shales and sandstones 24, 482 

liOOKorx Mountain, Tennessee, Natural bridge at 21, 327, 329 

Loom IS, F. B., Analysis of the pyrotherium fauna 25, 140 

— cited on dinosaurs 25, 401 

origin of fossils from Niobrara Valley 29, 273 

— elected Fellow 21, 3 

— ; I'hylogenetic i)Osition of the genus Stegomylus 21, 75 

— ; Preliminary discussion of the stratigraphy and age of the Pyro- 
therium beds of Patagonia 24, 52, 107 

— presided at morning session, Deceml>er 30. 1915 27, 153 

Section of Vertebrate I*aleontolog3', December 29, 1915 27, 149 

— . Reference to "The American Society of Vertebrate Paleontology" by. 

27,350 

— , Remarks on ••mutations" by 27, 148 

Sauropods by * 27, 151 

— ; Restoration of some pyrotherium mammals 25, 139 

— ; South Carolina mastodon 28, 210 

— and Gbabau, Amadei^s W., Ontogeny and paleontology 21, 74 

Ix>RD, , cited on veins of chalcopyrite and galena 25, 474 

Ijobetz, II., cited on Ceratopyge of Thurlngian forest 27, 595 

Lory, C, cited on metamorphism 28, 402 

LossEN, K. A., cited on metamon)hism 28, 379 

Iy)UDEBRACK, G. D. ,* Basiu Range faulting in the northwestern part of 

the Great Basin 26, 138 



170 J. STANLEY-BROWN INDEX TO VOLUMES 21 TO 30 

Page 
Tx>UDERBACK, G. D., cited on oropenic movement in western Xeviidii. . . . 21, 554 

— , Coal resources of China dlscnssed by 24. 93 

— , DiscuHsion of Arizona erosion and dejwsition by 25, 125 

cliniatie provinces by 25, 124 

geologic structure in western Washington by 26, 136 

Great Basin deformations by 25, 122 

Haywards Rift by 25. 12,3 

Nevada stibnite by 25, 126 

nomenclature by 25, 125 

[)etrologic nomenclature by 26, 135 

Tertiary rocks of Oahu by 26, 134 

on fanglomerate by 23, 72 

— elected Secretary Cordilleran Section 21, 790 ; 23, 70 ; 25, 125 : 26, 129 

— ; General features of the structure of the bedrock complex of the 

Sierra Nevada 24. 98 

— , Geological section of California coast ranges discussed by 24, 93 

— , Gypsum and anhydrite from the Ludwig mine discussed by 24, 9,3 

— , Indices of crystal faces discussed by 24, 93 

— , Iron-ore deposit at Barth, Nevada, discussed by 24, 97 

— , Origin of sandstone near Carson City discussed by 23, 72 

— , Orthodase as a vein mineral discussed by 23, 72 

— , Paper of C. H. Hitchcock read by 21. 741 

— , Remarks on the relations of the Martinez and Tejon by 24, 127 

— ; Secondary pseudo-stratification in Santa Barbara County, California 

21, 791 
— ; Some general features of the Miocene of the southern Coast Range 

region of California 23, 72 

— ; Structural features of the Tsiu Ling Shan 26, 405 

— , Ventura County oil fields discussed by 24, 97 

— and Blasdale, W. C. ; Ruby corundum from San Bernardino County, 

California 21, 793 

LouonLiN, G. F., cited on cpiartz dejxjsits 25, 473 

Sterling granite 25, 470 

— ; Rock products and the war 30, 97 

liOUGHKiuQK, Robert Hills, Bibliography of 29, 53 

— , Memorial of ^ 29, 48 

— , Work on cotton rejwrts of 25, 176 

Louis, U., cited on oolitic iron ores 25, 770 

Ix)ui8iANA, Geological work in 25, 170 

— , Loess-depositing winds in 29. 79 

— , Map of 28, 705 

— , Oil fields of 28, 561, 565, 709 

Ix)w, A. r., cited on beach at Nachvack Bay 29. 227 

Hudson Bay limestones 30, 355 

metamorphism 28, 402 

— elected Second Vice-President 21,3 

Lower and Middle Cambrian faunas of the Mohave Desert ; C. W. Clarke 

28,230 



LOWER LULL 171 

Page 
LowEB California, Fauua from , 28, 223 

— Devonian— Lower Old Red, Stratigraphy of 27, 366-370 

— Edmonton, Dinosaur fauna of 26, 337 

— Fort Union beds 26, 325 

— Miocene of California, Correlation of the ; Ralph Arnold 26, 415 

Washington; C. E. Weaver 25,153 

— Ordovician and Upper Cambrian sediments of Center County, Penn- 

sylvania, Notes on origin of certain 24, 112 

at Glenogle, British Columbia ; L. D. Burling 24, 52 

— Ordovicic formations 27, 555 

— Paleozoic rocks of the southern New Mexico region ; N. II. Darton . 28, 172 

section of the Alaska-Yukon boundary ; L. D. Burling 26, 137 

LozANO, E. D., cited on Mexican fossils 29, 609 

Lucas, A. F., cited on dome theory of Coastal Plain 28, 575, 579, 587 

Lucas, F. A., cited on fossils from Chinle formation 30, 496 

Im[)erlal mammoth measurements 26, 407 

Lucas, I. II., Reference of collections by 30, 383 

Lucas, O. W., Discovery of Camarausaurus fT)ssils by 30, 380 

LuDwio, R., cited on pillow structure 26, 597 

LuDwio mine, Lyon County, Nevada, (gypsum and anhydrite from the. 24,94 

Lull, R. S. ; Armor of Stegosaurus 21, 75 

— ; Barasaurus : a gigantic saun)ix)d dinosaur 28, 214 

— ; Brontotherium : a new mount in the Yale Museum 28, 214 

— , chairman sectional meeting on Vertebrate Paleontology 24, 117 

— cited on comiwsite rhythm In dias trophism 28, 890, 898 

Morrison formation 29, 249,261 

— ; Correlation between the terrestrial Trlassic forms of western North 

America and Europe 26, 413 

— ; Cretaceous dinosaurs 23, 85, 208 

— , Cuban fossil mammals discussed by 24, 109 

— , Discnission of local glaciation in White Mountains, Adirondacks, and 

Catskills by 28, 136 

Sauropod dinosaurs by 26, 153 

— elected chairman I*aleontologlcal Society meetin«x 26, 129 

Fellow 21, 3 

Treasurer Paleontological Society 24, 104 

— ; Horned Artldactyl from the Tertiary of Nebraska 28, 211 

— ; Miocene dolphin from California 26, 142 

— ; New accessions to the exhibition series at Yale Museum 26, 143 

mastodon found In Connecticut 26, 143 

— , Paleontological notes discussed by 24, 109 

— presided at meeting 26, 139, 142 

— ; The pulse of life 28, 197 

— quoted on the reptiles of the Ariuidel formation 26, 337 

— , Remarkable skeleton of Stegosaurus di.scussed by 23, 87 

— ; Restoration of i)aleolithic men 21, 75 

— ; Sauroi)oda and Stegosaurla of the Morrison compared with those of 

South America, England, and eastern Africa 26,90,151,323-334 



174 J. STANLEY-BROWX INDEX TO VOLUMES 21 TO 30 

Pnpe 

MclNNESs, William, cited on Silurian fossils 30. 355 

Macnair, Peter, cited on jfeolopic climates 30, 553 

Old Red Sandstone 27, 349 

McXaib, F. W.. Xoto on a method in teachint? optical mineralogy 21,31 

Macoun, , cited on climate of I>on and Scarboro be<ts 26, 247 

Macroiwtella n. sp., Fossil of the quartzite at Geneva 21, 527 

Mactrid.e, Evolution of the Pacific Coast : E. L. Packard 26, 170 

— of west coast 25, 151 

Madagascar, Reference to climatic changes in 25, 482 

Maddren, a. O., cited on Tindir rocks of Porcupine River 25, 188 

— , Reference to "Geologic investigations along the (^anada-Alaska bound- 
ary** of 27, 702 

Madison, Wisconsin, Cambrian and Ozarkian sandstones near 27, 400 

M^STRicnTiEN stage. Reference to 26, 321 

Magdalen Islands, Glacial drift on 26, 84 

Magma, Effects of the solution of carlwnates in subalkallne 21, 108 

Magmas, Subalkaline rocks genetically connected with subalkallne.... 21,00 
Magmatic assimilation ; F. Bascom 26, 82 

— differentiation and assimilation in the Adirondack region; W. J. 

Miller 26, 45, 243 

— sulfids ; C. F. Tolman, Jr., and A. F. Rogers 28, 132 

Magnestte industry ; R. W. Stone 30, 115 

• Magneshtm and calcium metasilicate. Diagram showing relation lietween 

21, 172 
Magnetic iron-ore deposits of Clinton County, New York; W. J. Miller. 30, 93 

Magnetites, Microstructure of tltaniferous 24, 73, 704 

Magnetoorapii, Valuable instrument for earthquake records 21, 382 

Maoothy formation of the Atlantic coast ; A. B. Bihbins 21, 30, 780 

Maine coast. Recent subsidence on 27, 108 

— , Evidence of recent subsidence on the coast of 26, 01 

— , Glacial beaches in 29, 207 

— , Late Pleistocene shoreline in 29, 74 

— , Litchfleldite and soda -syenites from 29, 00, 463 

— , Mineral from 29, 463 

— , Pillow lavas of 25, 620 

— , Pleistocene and post-Pleistocene geology of 28, 167, 309 

— . Sand-plains of 30, 628 

— , Toi>ography of ^ 29, 210 

Malay earth-lobe and the Himalaya reentrant, Contrasted forms of 

21, 191-195 

Malcolm, W., cited on Canada oil fields 28, 726 

Maixadra, a., cited on fumaroles of Vesuvius 26, 377 

"repose" conditions of Vesuvius 26, 376 

Vesuvius 28, 271. 274 

Maujtt. .1. W., cite<l on allanite 28, 475 

metamorphism 28, 380 

Malouin. Alfred, Acknowledgments to 21, 681 

Mammal fauna of Hawver Cave in California 27, 169 



MAMMAL MANSON 175 

Mammal faunie, Correlation of Cenozoio 24^ 290 

in South America, Euroi^e, and Asiri, Correlation of 23, 251-254 

— remains in the asphalt heds of Mi'Kittriok, California; N. C. Corn- 

wall 26, 167 

Mammalian fauna, Aftonian 21, 120; 22, 66, 207 

of the Pleisto(*ene heds at Manix, in the Mohave Desert rejBrion ; 

J. v. Buwalda 25, 156 

— faunas (Miocene) of western United States; relation to those of Eu- 

rope and Asia 26, 416 

— jaw from the Truckee l>eds of western Nevada 29, 161 

— Miocene fauna from Tehachapi region 27, 170 

Mammals, Cuhan fossil 24, 109, 118 

— of the Antilles 29, 658 

— , Orifjin of sternum in 27, 152 

— , Restoration of Tertiary 24, 105 

— , Significance of indices and ratios in the phylogenetic and systematic 

study of ; H. F. Osborn 24, 120 

— , South American 23, 85 

Mammoth (^ave, Bibliograph of 23, 51, 747 

— tusks from Lena River, Siberia, Study of ninety thousand pounds of ; 

G. F. Kunz 26, 407 

Man. Geologic deposits in relation to Pleistocene 26, 109 

— , Paleontologj' of 21, 74 

— , Pithecanthropus and Piltdown and Neanderthal 26, 149 

— , Restoration of paleolithic 21, 75 

Manchuria, Coal deix)sits of 28, 130 

Mancos beds, Flora of the 25, 334 

— shale, New Mexico 23, 594 

Manganese deposits of Conception and Trinity bays, Newfoundland ; 

N. C. Dale 25, 73 

— ore as a war mineral ; I). F. Hewett 30, 97 

Maniijji, Iowa, Pleistocene deposits in 29, 77 

Manitoba, Birds Hill : An esker near Winnipeg 21, 26, 407, 432 

— , Records of Lake Agassiz in 28, 145 

Manitoi^ijn Islands, The Cataract formation traced from Niagara Falls 

to the 24, 107 

— limestone 25, 280 

Manitowaning section, Ontario 25, 320 

Manning, Van H., cited on radium 27, 25 

Mansfield, G. R., elected Fellow 21, 4 

— , Geologic map of the Fort Hall Indian Reservation 27, 64 

— ; Origin of Cliff Lake. Montana 21, 26, 764 

— ; Preliminary map of the Wayan quadrangle, Idaho- Wyoming 27, 65 

— ; Subdivisions of the Thaynes limestone and nugget sandstone, Meso- 

zoic, in the Fort Hall Indian Reservation, Idaho 27, 70 

— and RouNDY, P. V.; Stratigraphy of some formations hitherto calleti 

Reckwith and Bear River, in southeastern Idaho 27, 70 

Manson, Marsdon, cited on evolution of climates 30, 542 



176 J. STANLEY-BROWN INDEX TO VOLUMES 21 TO 30 

Page 

MAN80N, Mabsdon ; Geologic and present climates 30, 103 

Map of Alaska, Minimum area of sbocks felt, September 3, 1899, earth- 
quake. Shown by 21, 347 

, September 10, 1899, shown by '. . . 21, 357 

(Brooks), Kelation of mountain axes to earthquake oritfln In 

Yakutat Bay shown by 21, 343 

Brazil by J. C. Branner 28* 127 

northeastern Utah 21, 521 

Oklahoma, A projjress geolosrlc 21, 29, 777 

the A^onquin and Irociuois beaches, Isobasic 21, 233 

world, showing distribution of Tertiary mountain ranges 21,211 

Yakutat Bay 21, 360 

Mapi^w^ood shale 29. 341 

Mapping, A method of aerial topographic 30, 110 

— , Plane-table for mllitarj' 30. Ill 

Mabanhao, Geology of 30, 254 

Marble, Photograph of schistose 27, 442, 443 

— . Structure of 27, 440-445 

— . Tc»pography of 27, 438 

Marbles, Crystalline, Alabama 27, 437 

— of Alabama, Crystalline 26. 104 

— ; Characteristics of the soil and its relation to geology 27, 114 

Marbut, C. F., E. B. Branson introduced by 23, 48 

Mabcou, Jules, cite<l on California Eocene 29, 283 

— , (teological work of 25, 1<>5 

Mabcy*s survey of the Bed River of rx)uislana. Reference to 25, 165 

Maboerie, E. de, cited on mouo<*lines 27, 91, 92 

Marine beds at Montreal, I>eformation observed in the 24. 225 

— elastics. Diagnostic characteristics of 28. 162. 207, 905 

— deposits, A classification of 24, 74, 711 

— faunas. Bottom control of composition of 27. 160 

, Influence of l>ottoni and depth on 27, 4.'>4 

in Pennsylvania strata 29, 97 

— mannnals ; F. W. True 23, 85, 197* 

— Oligocene of the west coast of North America ; B. L. Clark and Ralph 

Arnold 1 29, 153. 297 

— plane 27. 240 

— reptiles ; J. C. Merriam 23, 86, 221 

— strata of southwestern Washington, Age and thickness of 24, 131 

— Tertiary of California 26. 168 

— Triassic invertebrate fauna from New Zealand; C. T. Trechmann.. 27, 172 

— vertebrates of western North America compared with those of other 

Triassic areas ; J. C. Merriam 26, 413 

— waters. New York State 24. 157 

Mari^oro formation 25. 441 

Marr, J. E., cited on Armoricain grit 27. 584 

— , Reference to "The classlttcation of the Cambrian and Siluric rocks" 

of 27. 558 



MARSH MARTIN 177 

Page 

Mabsh, O. Cm cited on Bothriospondylug and Pleurocaclus 26, 331 

Lance fauna 25, 391 

opinion that European Wealden was Upper Jurassic 26, 338 

the Morrison dinosaurs 26, 304 

Thinopug antiquus 27, 409 

— , Inadequacy of classification of dinosaurs by 25, 378 

— , Quotation from his "Dinosaurs of North America" 26, 331 

— , Reference to "Amphibian footprints from the Devonian" by 27, 409 

Mabshaix^ , cited on alkaline rocks of Hawaii 27, 330 

Marstebs, Vebnon F. ; Bibliography of the geological and geographical 

literature of the Andean Republic of South America 24, 75 

Marsupiaua ; William K. Gregory 23, 188 

Marthas ViifETARD, Absence of bars on 28, 285 

submergence 29, 188 

Martin, Bruce, appointed representative of Paleontological Society.. 25,150 

— , Collection from the Umpqua formation 26, 109 

— ; Fauna! relations of the Upper Neocene in the Sargent oil fields, Cali- 
fornia 24, 129 

— ; Geological section of a portion of the coast ranges in the eastern 

part of San Luis Obispo County, California 24, 93 

— ; Observations on the use of the percentage method in determining the 

age of Tertiary formations in California 25, 152 

Martin, O. C, cited on flow of oil after Alaskan earthquake of 1899. . 21,304 

— ; Mesozoic stratigraphy of Alaska 23, 30, 724 

— , Reference to "The Mesozoic stratigraphy of Alaska" of 27, 087 

**The western part of Kenai Peninsula" of 27, 098 

— , Remarks on lake clays by 27, 81 

— ; Triassic rocks of Alaska 27, 119, 085 

— and Katz, F. J., Reference to "A geologic reconnaissance of the 

Iliamna region, Alaska," of 27, 097, 700 

Martin, J. C, Reference to pre-Cambrian rocks mapped for the Canton 

sheet 26, 288 

Martin, Lawrence ; Alaskan earthquake of 1899 21, 23, 339-400 

— ; Canyon and delta of the Copper River in Alaska 24, 71, 099 

— cited on Keweenaw series 27, 97 

— , Discussion on relationship of Niagara River to the glacial period 

by 21, 20, 703 

— elected Fellow 21, 4 

— , Possible oblique minor faulting in Alaska, Reference to 21, 341 

— , Reference to war work of SO, 177 

— ; Rock terraces in the drif tless area of Wisconsin 28, 148 

— ; Submarine topography in Glacier Bay, Alaska 25, 88 

— ; Two glaciers in Alaska 22, 00, 731 

-^ and Tarr, R. S. ; Glacial deposits of continental type in Alaska . 23, 44, 729 

, Glaciers and glaciation of Yakutat Bay, Alaska, Reference to 21,301 

, Map of Yakutat Bay by 21, 300 

, Oscillations of Alaskan glaciers by 21, 20, 758 

, Recent changes of level in Alaska, Reference to 21, 341, 301 

ZII — ^BuLL. OsoL. Sec. Am. 



ITS J. STANLKY-RHOWX INDEX TO VOLUMES 21 TO 30 

Page 

Marti N'Zkd£, Georoes, Acknowledgments to 21, 681 

Martinez and Tejon south of Mount Diablo, California, Stratlgraphlc 

and fauna] relations of the ; Roy C. Dlckerson 24, 127 

— . Eo(*ene of California 26, 154 

— ^'roup of California, Section of 29, 286 

Martinsrubg shale, Age of 29. 94 

Martonne, E. ue, Chart of distribution of loess by 26, 575 

- cited on Carpathian Mountains 28, 545 

Martvillr Hnudstone 29, 342 

Mary INK, Arciiirau) R., Ancient surface of erosion recognized by.... 23,101 

Maryland, Coal Measures of 30, 154, 567 

— , Correlation of Coal Measures of 30, 578 

--^, distribution of allanlte in 28, 475 

~, Generalized section through the Appalachian Mountains of 21,24 

— \ Marine fossils from 30, 575 

— , Newark system in 30, 155 

— , Paleozoic deposits of the Piedmont In 29, 127 

-^, 8and-chrome deposits of 30, 111 

— , Sections of Coal Measures of 30, 578-582 

— , -Silurian system of 27, 89 

— , ITpi)er Cayugan of 21, 30, 781 

Makcareniias, Henrique de Paui^, iiuoted on antH and coffee culture in 

Brazil 21. 456 

Massachusetts, Altitudes in 29, 208 

— , Heach cusps at Lynn beach 21, 600 

-, Cumberland-Diamond Hill district of 26. 75 

— , DiHtributiou of allanlte in 28, 468 

— , Fayalite in granite of Rockport 21, 33, 787 

— , Flooding of Connecticut Valley in 30, 615 

~, Glacial lake plains in I 30, 631 

slate of 28, 152 

— Institute of Technolog>' and Harvard ITniversity, Vote of thanks to 

geologists and mineralogists of 21, 34 

• — (department of geology), Society entertalninl by 21, 22 

— , Natural biidge at North Adams 22, 328 

— , Occurrence of Great Barrlngton boulder train hi 21, ITi 

— , Pegmatite in granite of Quiucy v 21, 33, 784 

— , Pillow lavas of 26, 621 

— , Pleistocene phenomena of central 21, 31 

— , Residual sand at Medford 21, 627 

— t Rhode Island Diamond Hill-Cumberland district 26, 435 

— , Some new fossils from the Cambrian of South Attleboro 21, 76 

— , Submarine chamtecyparis bog and its relation to the in-oblem of 

coastal subsidence at Woods Hole 24, 72, 699 

Mastodon discussed by Barnuny Brown 28, 211 

\V. D. Matthew 28, 211 

J. C. Merriam 28, 211 

— find in Connecticut 26.-143 



MASTODON MATTHEW 179 

Page 

Mastodon from South Dakota 29, 183 

South Carolina 28, 210 

Mastodons, Restoration of 25, 142 

the world's series of 26, 407-410 

Mather, Kibtley F., cited on Silurian formation in New York 27, 532 

— , Photographs by 29, 487 

— and Atwood, Waixace W. ; Geographic history of the San Juan Moun- 

tains since the close of the Mesozolc era 27, 38 

Mathews, E. B. ; "Deeps" in the channel of the lower Susquehanna 

River 28, 151, 335 

— elected member of Auditing Committee 23, 2 ; 25, 5 ; 26, 11 ; 27, 11 

— , Index-Ellipsoid in petrographic-microscopic work discussed by . . 24, 53, 681 

— , Outline of accomplishments of subcommittee on roads 29, 70 

— , Reference to war work of 30, 177 

— ; Relative efficiency of normative and modal classifications of igneous 

rocks 30, 91 

— , Securities of the Society examined by 23, 44 ; 25, 49 ; 26, 87 ; 27, 60 

Mathews, J, Howabd; Application of color i)hotography to optical min- 
eralogy*- 23, 51 

Matson, G. C, cited on Louisiana oil 28, 709 

Matthes, F. B. ; The American topographer in the rOle of artillery 

orientation officer 30, 110 

— , Cliff sculpture of the Yosemlte Valley by 21, 20, 759 

— , Discussion on oscillations of Alaskan glaciers by 21, 20, 758 

rock streams of Veta Mountain by 21, 26, 764 

— ; Lessons of the Little Yosemlte Valley 22,65,730 

— ; Level of maximum precipitation as a factor in the glaciation of 

Mount Ranier. 24, 72, 701 

— ; Tertiary -Qua ternary orogenic history of the Sierra Nevada in the 

light of recent studies in the Yosemite region 27, 46 

Matthew, G. F., cited on batrachian footprints 27, 410 

geologic climates 30, 510 

— ; Movements of the earth's crust at Saint John, New Brunswick, in 

post-GIacial times, Reference to 22, 165 

Matthew, W. D., Acknowledgments to 25,'356 

— acted as Secretary of meeting 25, 139 

— ; Affinities and origin of the Antillean mammals 29, 138, 657 

phylogeny of the extinct Camelida* 29, 144 

of Hyopsudus 26, 152 

— ; African mammals 23, 85, 156 

— , Alisphenoid and Lachrymal in vertebrates discussed by 24, 118 

— , Artiodactyla discussed by 23, 86 

— ; Camlvora and rodentla 23, 85, 181 

— ; Certain theoretical considerations affecting phylogeny and correla- 
tion 24, 118, 283-291 

— cited on climate and evolution 29, 665 

comparative size of African and American Sauropods 26, 329 

Cope collection of fossil reptiles 30, 383 



ISO J. staxt>:y-iuu)Wn — indkx to volumks 21 to 30 

Vngo 

^rATTHEw, W. D., cited on (Cuba's land conneotions 29, 627 

evolution of land life , 27, 39() 

— - extension of the definition of Laramie 25, 338 

- new evidence of the relationship of tlie Xotharctldjp with tlie 

Adapidijo, with the Lemurs, and with other groups 26, 421 

— ocean basins 29, 636 

- — origin of White Kivor beds 28, 742 

time ratios in evolution of manunalian i)hyla 28, 814 

- Contributions to geologic theory and method discussed liy 23, SO 

- Correlation and paleogeography discussed by 23. ST) 

. Council instructed to designate a bank of deposit for the Treasurer's 

funds, On motion of 23, 84 

— ; Cuban fossil mammals, preliminary note 24, 109, 118 

— -. Discussion of Adapida? and other Lemuroidea and phylogeny of the 

higher primates by 26, 153 

- fossil mammals by 28, 210 

vertebrate localities of Florida by 26, 154 

geological education of engineers by 28, 138 

mastodon ' 28, 211 

Mylodont sloths by 25, 144 

— — paleontologic criteria in time relations by 26, 411 

— Pleistocene cave deposit by 25, 142 

Pyrotherium mammals 25, 140 

symposium papers by 25, 130 

the Lemuroidea by 25, 141 

on the symposium "Correlation of the Cretaceous'' by 26, 415 

— elected Secretary of meeting of Paleontological Society 25, 129 

— — Treasurer Paleontological Society 21, 72 

— , Entomolcstca pranyeH named by 24, 249 

— ; Evidence of the Paleocene vertebrate fauna on the Cretaceous-Ter- 
tiary problem 25, 381 

— , Faunal divisions among the vertebrates of the Pleistocene discussed 

by 23, 87 

— , Fish fauna discovered by 23, 87 

— ; Generic nomenclature of the Proboscidea 29, 141 

— ; Gigantic megatherium from Florida 28, 212 

— , Introduction of H. J. Cook 28. 213 

— ; Later Tertiary formations of western Nebraska 28, 197 

— ; Methods of correlation by fossil vertebrates 27, 515 

— ; Mounted skeleton of Blantocerus pampans — fossil deer from Argen- 
tina 27, 153 

Cania dirua, with remarks on the methods of reconstruction 

of extinct animals 27, 153 

— ; Notes on the American Pliocene rhinoceroses 29, 153 

— ; Osteology and relationship of paramys and the affinities of the Ischy- 

romyidfle 21, 74 

— , Paleontological Society called to order by Vice-President 23, 87 

— k Perlssodactyla discussed by 23, 85 



MATTHEW MEANDERS 181 

Matthew, W. D. ; Phylogeny of the Felidse 21, 74 

— ; Problem of correlation by use of vertebrateH 26, 411 

— ; Reconstruction of the skeleton of Brachiosaurus 26, 153 

— , Reference to "Climate and evolution" by 29, 015 

investigations by 25, 323 

symposium paper by 25, 130 

war work of 30, 178 

— ; Relation of the Miocene mammalian faunas of western United States 

to those of Europe and Asia 26, 416 

— , Relations of the Tiipaiidie and of the Eocene Lemurs discussed by. 24, 117 

— , Remarkable skeleton of Stegosaurus discussed by 23, 87 

— , Remarks on pisolites at San Antonio, Texas, by 26, 398 

the Texas Tertiary sands by 26, 398 

of progress in the revision of the Lower Eocene faunas 25, 144 

on vertebrates from the Cold Springs horizon 26 470 

— , Secretary Section Vertebrate Paleontology 26, 151 ; 24, 117 

— ; Skeleton of Diatryma, a gigantic bird of the Low^er Eocene 28, 212 

— , South American mammals discussed by 23, 85 

— , Yale expedition of 1912 discussed by 24, 117 

— and Clarke, J. M. ; Peccaries of the Pleistocene of New York 26, 150 

Granges, Walter ; Fossil mammals of the Tiffany beils 20, 152 

Torre, Carlos de la; Magalocnus and otlier Cuban ground-sloths 26, 152 

Matto Grosso, (Jeology of 30, 250 

Maumee Lake, Map of 29, 242 

, Ohio ; Frank Carney 22, 05, 720 

Mauritius, Reference to climatic changes in 25, 482 

Maury, Carijotta J., Reference to interglacial bed near Cayuga I^ake, 

New York, descrit)ed by 26, 251 

Mauzelius, R., Analyses by 27, 207 

Mawsox, Douglas, cited on salt 29, 470 

Maya ruins as evidence of climatic changes , 25, 539 

Mayer Eymar, C, cited on demarcation between Cretaceous and Eocene 

25, 321 
Maynard, T. p.; Cartersville iK)tash slates: their o(M)nonn<* relations to 

chemical and industrial post-war development 30, 112 

— ; Upper Cayugan of Maryland 21, 30, 781 

Mayville beds of Wisconsin, Correlation with Alexandrian rocks of Illi- 
nois of 27, 310 

- limestone. Photograph of 27, 323 

Mazzuou, L., cited on pillow structure 25, 59$) 

Mead, W. J., cited on classification of motamorphic i-oi-ks 28. 452-453,457 

measurement of geolojric time 28, 7S.'{ 

metamorphism 28, 383 

origin of silica 29, 595 

sedimentation 28, 784 

— , Porosity of Bighorn dolomite determined by 24, 021 

Meanders and scallops ; M. S. W. Jeflferson 21, 20, 705 

— in the Connecticut Valley, Glacial 25, 232 



182 J. STANLEY-BROWN — INDEX TO VOLUMES 21 TO 30 

I 

Page 

Meanders of stream 20» 79 

Mears, H. S., Analysis of quartz rock and felsite by 26, 473 

— cited on Diamond Hill quartz deposits 26, 471 

Measurements of geologic time 28, 745 

— — geological time based on radioactivity 28, 842 

Mechanical composition of clastic sediments 26, 655 

Mechanics of faults ; H. F. Reid 21, 25, 766 

formation of arcuate mountains ; W. H. Hobbs 26, 30 

Intrusion of the Black Hills Preoambrlan granite; Sidney Paige. 27,104 

laccolithic intrusion ; C. R. Keyes 29, 75 

Medford, Massachusetts, Residual sand at 21, 627 

Median eye In trllobites 27, 146 

Medicine Bow Mountains, Precambrian rocks In 29, 97 

Medina age, Shawangunk fol-matlon of 26, 150 

— and Cataract formations of the Silurlc of New York and Ontario; 

Charles Schuchert 26, 277 

— , Cataract, and Clinton, Contacts between 26, 292 

— fauna. Fossils of 26, 288, 290 

— formation and Clinton or Sodus shale along the Niagara Grorge, Sec- 

tion of 24, 461 

, History of the 26, 297 

— of Ontario, To what part of the Richmond does it correspond? 23, 83 

— problem ; E. O. Ulrich 24, 107 

— sea, Paleogeography of 26, 295 

— section '. 26, 306 

— series 27, 534 

— , Tuscarora and Clinch formation and their extension In eastern United 

States 24, 459-467 

Mediterranean region, Ordoviclc formations of 27, 581 

MEDUSiG from Cambrian rocks of British Columbia, Fossil 22, 95 

Meek, F. B., cited on Dakota fauna 26, 347 

Megalocnus and other Cuban ground-sloths; Carlos de la Torre and 

W. D. Matthew 26, 152 

Meganos group, a newly recognized division In the Eocene of California ; 

B. L. Clark 29,281 

, Fauna of the 29, 152 

Megascopic character of hypersthene syenite 27, 198 

norlte 27, 227 

Mehl, M. G., Title of paper by 26, 135 

Meinzer, O. E., cited on basin terraces of New Mexico 26, 562 

Melanochalcite, Variable composition of 27, 61 

Melcher, a. F., cited on Increase in volume of a column or stratum of 

rock through crushing 26, 186 

Meldrum, H., cited on cyclones 26, 83 

tropical hurricanes 26, 494 

Mell, p. H., Memorial of 30, 43 

Melting curves of ortlioclase. Figure showing 21, 160 



MELTING MEMOIR 183 

Melting in an isomorphous Reries, Diat^ram showing chango in oomposi- 

tiou during 21, 167 

— point data, Interpretation of 21, 145 

— "points" and melting intervals , 21, 156 

Melts, Hydrous silicate 29, 102 

Members of Geological Society, List of 21, 54 ; 22, 72 ; 23, 56 ; 

24, 80 ; 25, 108 ; 26, 118 ; 27, 128 ; 28, 177 ; 29, 107 ; SO, 120 

Paleontological Society, List of 21, 83 ; 22, 97 ; 23, 89 ; 

24, 122 ; 26, 146 ; 26, 147 ; 27, ms ; 28, 218 ; 29, 156 ; 30, 159 

Memminger, C. C, cited on allanite 28, 477 

^f KMoiB of Alfred Ernest Barlow ; Frank D. Adams 26, 12 

Albert Smith Bickmore ; George Frederick Kunz 26, IS 

G. C. Broadhead ; C. R. Keyes 30, 13 

Amos P. Brown ; R. A. F. Penrose, Jr 29, 13 

Eniest Robertson Buckley ; H. A. Buehler 24, 44 

Delorne D. Caimes ; Charles Camsell 29, 17 

Samuel Calvin ; B. Shimek 23, 4 

William Bullock Clark ; John M. Clarke 29, 21 

Theodore Bryant Comstock ; Heinrich Rles 27, 12 

Charles A. Davis ; A. C. Lane 28, 14 

Orville A. Derby, Brief remarks by John M. Clarke on 27, 146 

; John C. Branner 27, 15 

Charles Wales Drysdale ; J. Austin Bancroft 29, 29 

Clarence Edward Dutton ; J. S. Diller 24, 10 

C. R. Eastman ; B. Dean 30, 27 

Samuel Franklin Emmons ; Arnold Hague 23, 12 

W. M. Fontaine; T. L. Wilson 26,6 

Persifor Frazer ; R. A. F. t'enrose, Jr 21, 5 

Arnold Hague ; Joseph P. Iddings 29, 35 

Christopher Webber Hall ; Newton H. Winchell 23, 28 

Charles Willard Hayes ; Alfred H. Brooks 28, 81 

Eugene Waldeniar Hilgard ; E. A. Smith 28, 40 

Frank A. Hill ; Balrd Halberstadt 28, 67 

Joseph Austin Holmes ; Josei>h Hyde Pratt 27, 22 

Horace Carter Hovey ; John M. Clarke 26, 21 

Edwin E. Howell ; Grove K. Gilbert 23, 30 

J. D. Irving; J. F. Kemp 30,37 

T. M. Jackson; J. C. White 24,48; 25,13 

Daniel W. Langton, Jr. ; E. A. Smith 21, 12 

Joseph Le Conte ; Herman L. Fairchild 26, 47 

Robert Hills Loughridge ; Eugene Allen Smith 29, 48 

W J McGee; F. H. Knowlton 24,18 

P. H. Mell ; F. H. H. Calhoun 30. 43 

Auguste Mlchel-L^vy ; Alexander N, Winchell 23, 32 

Albert Homer Purdue ; George H. Ashley 29, 55 

Charles Smith Prosser ; E. R. Cumings 28, 70 

Henry Martyn Seely ; George P. Perkins 29, 65 

^^ William John Sutton ; William Flett Robertson 27, 35 



184 J. STANLEY-BROWN ^INDEX TO VOLUMES 21 TO 3O 

Page 

Memoib Of Ralph Stockton Tarr ; J. B. Woodwortb 24. 29 

H. S. Williams; H. F. Cleland SO. 47 

S. W. Williston ; H. F. Osborn SO. 66 

A. B. Willmott; A. P. Coleman 27.37 

Newton Horace Winchell ; Warren Upham 26. 27 

Mendenhall, W. Cf quoted on the Keokuk and Alatna pass, Alaska. . . 23. 567 

Mendota dolomite, Fauna of 27. 477 

Menieb, Heniu, Acknowledgments to 21, 681 

Mennell, F. p., cited on metamorphism 28, 402 

Mebcalli, 6., cited on repose periods of Vesuvius 26. 376 

Stromboli , 28, 257, 262 

Meboen, W., cited on origin of oolites 25. 753 

Mebbiam, G. Habt, cited on barrier to migration of land mammals. . . . 25. 397 

— , Reference to studies by 26. 413, 415 

Mebuam, J. C. ; Age of tbe Rancbo la Brea beds near Los Angeles. . . . 21. 792 
— , Authority to organize the Cordilleran Section of the Paleontological 

Society given to 22. 88 

— , Chairman California Meeting of the Paleontological Society, August, 

1915 26, 410, 412, 416 

— cited on Cretaceous-Eocene boundary 26, 343 

fauna of Coalinga region 29. 303 

Tertiary faunas 29, 307 

Upper Miocene mammals 27, 524 

— ; Comparison of marine vertebrates of western North America with 

those of other Triassic areas 26, 413 

— ; Correlation of the Tertiary deposits in the Pacific coast and basin 

regions of North America 2S, 74 

formations of the Pacific coast an?l basin regions of western 

United States 26. 156 

— , Discussion of fossil mammals by 28, 210 

mastodon by 28, 211 

paleontologic criteria in time relations by 26, 411 

terrestrial Triassic forms by 26, 413 

Tertiary rocks of Aahu by 26, 134 

sedimentaries and lavas by 26, 137 

Triassic faunas by 26, 412 

on the symposimn "Correlation of the Cretaceous" by 26, 415 

— elected First Vice-President Paleontological Society 21, 71 

— , Eocene of San Pedro Point, California, discussed by 24, 126 

— , Excursions of California Meeting, August 7-13, 1915, in charge of. . 26,417 

— , Faulting in the Great Basin disaussed by 26, 139 

— ; Fauna of the Idaho formation 29, 162 

Pinole tuff 28, 230 

Tulare Pliocene of the Pacific Coast region 29, 152 

— ; FelidflB of Rancho La Brea 28. 211 

— ; HipparUm-like horses of the Pacific Coast and Great Basin provinces 27, 171 

— , J. C. Jones introduced by 26, 392 

— ; Marine reptiles 23, 86, 221 



MERRIAM MERRILL 185 

Pnge 

Mebbiam, J. C, Meeting called to order by President 20* 122 

— , Miocene of the southern Coast Range of California discussed by 23t 73 

— , Motion made by 25, 151 

— , Oldest fossils discussed by 24, 97 

— , Origin of sandstone near Carson City discussed by 23f 73 

— ; Outline of progress in paleontologic research on the Pacific coast, 

Presidential address by 29, 129 

— , Paper of F. H. Knowlton on Miocene floras read by 26, 416 

comparison of Cretaceous floras of California with those 

of other Cretaceous areas read by ^ 26, 414 

— ; Pliocene mammalian faunas of North America 28, 196 

— , President American Society of Vertebrate Paleontologists, Official 
notice given of agreement to unite with the Paleontological So- 
ciety by 22, 87 

— ; Puma-like cats of Rancho La Brea 29, 161 

— , Reference to war worlc of 30, 176 

— , Remarlis on new Miocene fauna by 27, 170 

Tertiary formations.. . .* 27, 169 

the Purissima and Etchegoin formations by 24, 129 

vertebrate fauna of Pliocene Jacalitos by 27, 172 

— , Report of arrangements for the meeting of the Paleontological Society 

in California, August, 1915, by 26, 147 

— , Resolution of condolence moved by 27, 168 

— ; Results of recent work at Rancho La Brea * 25, 143 

— ; Review of progress in paleontologic research in the Pacific Coast re- 
gion 28, 223 

the fauna of the Rattlesnake Pliocene of eastern Oregon 26, 169 

— , Structure of the Sierra Nevada bedrock complex discussed by 24, 98 

— ; Succession of Miocene faunas in the John Day region 28, 215 

— ; Suggestions as to definitions of terms used in designating units of 

geological classification 23, 71 

— ; Supplementary data bearing on the composition and age of the Thou- 
sand Creek Pliocene fauna 28, 226 

— ; Systematic position of the dire wolves of the American Pleistocene 29, 161 
— ; Terrestrial Oligocene of the basin region and its relation to the ma- 
rine Ollgocene of the Pacific Coast province 26, 153 

— ; Vertebrate fauna in the marine Tertiary of California ; their signifi- 
cance in determining the age of California Tertiary formations. 26, 168 

of the Orindan and Siestan formations , 26, 156* 

faunas of the Pacific Coast region 26, 416 

— and Camp, Charles L. ; Recent studies on skull structure of Thallat- 

tosaurus 27, 171 

Pack, Robert W. ; Suggested paleontologic correlation between con- 
tinental Miocene deposits of the Mohave region and marine Ter- 
tiary beds of San Joaquin Valley, California 24, 128 

— , Stock, Chester, and Moody, C. L. ; Fauna of the rodeo Pleistocene 27, 169 

Mebrux, F. J. H., cited qn Gay Head strata 30, 608 

geology of Long Island 28, 282, 289, 299, 300, 306 



186 J. STANLEY-BROWN INDEX TO VOLUMES 21 TO 30 

Page 

Mebbiix, F. J. H., cited on uplift in New York City and Peekskill 27, 239 

Mebbill, Q. p., Address at Dana centenary : Dana, the geologist 284, 04 

— ; Chemical and mineralogical composition of meteorites 27, 50 

— cited on allanlte 28, 467 

— • australites 27, 53 

chemical changes of uranium minerals 28, 865-866 

evidence against meteoritic origin of moldavites 26, 281 

lunar crater forms 26, 277 

rocks, rock-weathering and soils 21,630,636 

sand from beach of Santa Rosa Island, Florida 21, 636 

schist 28, 458 

temperature of meteorite on reaching earth*s surface 26, 284 

— , Discussion of coastal subsidence by 26, 60 

oolites of Chimney Hill formation by 26, 76 

— elected member of Auditing Committee 23, 2 

— , Moldavite question 22, 67, 736 

specimens from Bohemia loaned by 26, 284 

— , Origin of granites and metacrystals discussed by 24, 73, 704 

— quoted on concretions from Mexican oil wells 24, 263 

residual sand from Medford, Massachusetts 21, 627 

— , Reference to war work of SO, 184 

writings of 25, 159 

— V8, Suess on moldavites 26, 286 

— , Watson, T. L., and Laney, F. B., cited on unakite 27, 220 

Mebritt, J. W. ; Notes on the structural geology of the Hanover district, 

New Hampshire 24, 50, 672 

— ; Sedimentary character of gametiferous hornblende schist, Hanover, 

New Hampshire 25, 75 

as collaborator in mineralogic description of volcanoes 27, 62 

Mebwin, H. E., cited on analysis of lava 27, 54 

on calcium carbonate 28, d36 

volcanic phenomena 28, 273 

— ; Media of high refraction and some standard media of lower refrac- 
tion for the determination of refractive indices with the micro- 
scope 24, 54, 685 

— and PosNjAK, Eugsn; Definition and determination of the mineral 

hydroxides of iron 27, 61 

Mesa de Maya, New Mexico, Geologic cross-section of the, Figure show- 
ing 21,594 

Mesaverde formation 25, 345 

, Colorado and New Mexico 28, 598-607 

MESONACiDiE, New species of 27, 158 

Mesozoic and Cenozoic fishes ; C. R. Eastman 23, 86, 228 

Paleozoic delta conditions in the Appalachian province. Contrast 

of 23, 411 

Tertiary rocks, Coast ranges of California and Oregon 26, 111 

— delta cycle of the Atlantic Coastal Plain, The late 23, 405 

— era. History of San Juan Mountains since close of 27, 38 



MBSOZOIC — MEXICO 187 

Pass 

Mesqzoic floras of North and South America 29i 129» OOT 

— history of Mexico, Central America, and the West Indies ; T. W. Stan- 

ton •. . 26, 138, 601 

— mammals. Reference to 26, 822 

— marine vertebrates, Extension of history of 25, 366-867 

— Nugget Sandstone and Thaynes Limestone 27, 70 

— Pennsylvaniau-Orange group of Alaska 25, 201 

— period, Paleogeography of western North America during the 27,605 

— stratigraphy of Alaska ; G. C. Martin 28, 36, 724 

Metacrystals and granites by selective solution — a recantation. Origin 

of 24, 73, 704 

Mktamobphic area of Kansas 28, 419 

— rocks, Classification of 28, 451 

of the District of Columbia, Igneous and 28,'155 

Metamobphism and its phases ; R. A. Daly 28, 126, 375 

— , Bibliography of 28, 416 

— discussed by C. K. Leith 28, 126 

— , Production of apparent diorite by 24, 54, 684 

Metasiltcate, Diagram showing relation between calcium and magne- 
sium 21, 172 

Meteoric irons of Canyon Diablo, Certain so-called; Charles R. Keyes. . 

24, 54, 677 

Meteorite, Temperature on reaching earth's surface of a 26, 284 

Meteorites, Chemical and mineralogical composition of 27, 50 

— , Quantitative classification of ; Oliver C. Farrington 22, 67, 736 

Meteorological hypothesis of climatic changes 25, 481 

Meteorology, Signal Corps School of 30, 106 

Method of aerial topographic mapping; F. H. Mofl[it and J, W. Bagley. 30, 110 

measuring post-Glacial time ; W. O. Hotchkiss 28, 138 

discussed by L. D. Burling 28, 141 

Frank Leverett 28,141 

Methods of correlation by fossil vertebrates ; W. D. Matthew 27, 515 

study and the classification of American Tertiary bryozoa ; F. Canu 

and R. S. Sassier 28,204 

Meunier, Stanislas, cited on experimental geology 29, 175 

Mexican petroleum and the war ; E. W. Shaw 30, 109 

fields. Geology of 24, 254 

— tableland. Apparent basin-range structure in the. Figure showing. . . 21, 560 

, Older geologic structures of the ; 21, 556 

, Structure of the north end of. Figure showing 21, 557 

Mexico and United States, Arid provinces of northern 21, 566 

— , Correlation between invertebrate faunas of California and; E. L. 

Packard 26, 414 

— gulf coast between the Tamesi and Tuxpan rivers, Petroleum fields 

of 24, 73, 253-273, 706 

— , Mesozoic history of 29, 601 

— , Petroleum supply of 28, 611 

— , Tertiary mollusks and echinoderms from 28, 224 



188 J. STANLEY-BROWN INDEX TO VOLUMES 21 TO 30 

Page 

MiAix, , cited on the crocodile ; 28, 984 

Miami and Kentucky rivers, Preglacial 25, 95 

MicHALSKY, A., cited on glauconite limestone 27, 592 

MicHELsoN, A. A., cited on measuring terrestrial tides 26, 172 

Michigan, Devonic black shale of 26, 137 

— Geological Survey, Reference to Monroe oolites in report of 21,645 

— , Traverse group of 27, 159 

—. Uplift in 29,201 

MiCKUE, G. R., cited on Ontario oil fields 28, 724 

Micboscope, Media for determining refractive indices with the 24, 54, 685 

Microscopic character of feldspar 27, 199 

— description of norite 27, 227 

— structural features of the banded glacial slate of Permocarboniferous 

age at Squantum, Massachusetts ; R. W. Sayles 28, 152 

Micbo>sections of oolitic structures 26, 778-780 

Micbostbucture of titaniferous magnetites ; Joseph T. Siugewald, Jr. . . . 

24, 73, 704 

Mid-continent oil fields ; J. H. Gardner 28, 157, 685 

Mid-continental oil fields, Production of 28, 686 

Mid-Devonic formations. Relation of Traverse group to 27, 159 

Middle Cambrian crustaceans from British Columbia; Charles D. Wal- 

cott 23, 84 

— Old Red-Orcadian formations, Stratigraphy of 27, 370578 

— Ordoviclan formations of Ontario and Quebec, Correlation of the. . . 24.111 

— Triasslc rocks 27, 690 

Midway formation of the Eocene 25, 332 

MiERS, H. A., Science and progress. Reference to 21, 164 

— and Isaac F., Journal of the Chemical Society (London), transactions. 

Reference to 21, 164 

Migration and diastrophism of fauna 26, 397 

— and succession of human types of the Old Stone Age of Europe ; H. F. 

Osborn 26, 149 

— ; Henry S. Williams and Arthur Hollick 21, 73 

— in ore deposits, R61e of colloidal 26, 394 

— of geosyncllnes ; A. W. Grabau 30, 87 

Upper Devonic corals 27, 147 

Migrations, Admixture of blood through 24, 284 

— and the shifting of Devonian faunas, Henry S. Williams 21. 76, 285-294 

— , Effects of, interrupted 24, 287 

Milch, L., cited on nfetamorphism 28, 400 

MiLFORD granite of Diamond Hill-Cumberland district 26, 454 

Military and geologic mapping — a plane-table ; A. M. Bnteman 30, 405 

— contribution of civilian engineers, G. O. Smith 30, 79, 399 

Mill, H. R., Reference to international geography of 21, 223 

Miller, A. L., Fish fauna discussed by 23, 87 

Miller, A. M., cited on glacial bands 27, 113 

natural arches of Kentucky 21, 324 

— ; Faulting in north-central Kentucky 27, 101 



MILLER MILLER 



189 



Page 

M11J.ER, E. M., Discussion of Kentucky oolites by 25, 59 

Miller, G. S., cited on mammalian fossils of Cuba and Santo Domingo 29,626 

West Indian mammals 29, 659 

— , Reference to studies by 25, 413, 416 

MiLLEB, Hugh, cited on continental deiwsits 28, 742 

geologic climates ' 30, 553 

Old Red Sandstone 27, 349 

Miller, L. H. ; Contributions to avian paleontology from tbe Pacific coast 

of North America 24, 132 

— elected Vice-President of the Pacific Coast Section of the Paleonto- 

logical Society 24, 126 

— ; Review of the Pleistocene species, Pavo calif oniictia 27, 171 

- : Some problems encountered in the study of fossil birds of the west 

coast 26, 417 

MiLiXB, Paul, Cacops espiccphorus prepared and mounted by 21, 252 

— , Fossils discovered by 21, 251 

Miller, S. A., on committee Cincinnati meeting, 1881 21, 742 

Miliar, W. G. ; Canadian oil field 28, 157 

— , Classification of metamorphic rocks 28, 155, 451 

— cited on geology of Remsen quadrangle 28, 325 

gneissoid granites 28, 459, 461 

metamorphism 28, 402 

— ; Cobalt-nickel arsenides and silver deposits of Temiskaming, Refer- 

» ence to 22, 148 

— , Discussion of thrust-faults by 28, 160 

conditions of the Keewatin by 21, 25 

origin of the alkaline rocks by 21, 32 

— elected Councilor 24, 9 

— ; Imperial Mineral Resources Bureau, London, England 30, 100 

— ; Petroleum in Canada 28, 721 

— and Knight, Cyril W. ; The pre-Cambrian of southeastern Ontario. . 22, 55 

; Revision of pre-Cambrian classification in Ontario 26, 87 

Miller, W. J., Acknowledgments to 29, 330 

— ; AdirondacK anorthosite 29, 99, 399 

— cited on Adirondack rocks 25, 248, 251, 256-259 

glacial lakes in the Adirondacks 27, 665 

Lake Pottervllle in the Adirondacks 27, 665 

New York Clinton 29, 354 

syenite and granite of Adirondacks 27, 213 

— , Discussion of Adirondack geology by 25, 47 

Precambrian nomenclature by 29, 92 

rift-mountain by 26, 90 

— elected Fellow 21, 4 

— ; Early Paleozoic physiography of the southern Adirondacks 24, 72, 701 

— , Magmatic differentiation and assimilation in the Adirondack region. . 

25, 45, 243 

— ; Magnetic iron-ore deposits of Clinton County, New York 30, 93 

— ; Origin of foliation in the Precambrian rocks of northern New York. 27, 57 



190 J. STANLEY-BROWN INDEX TO VOLUMES 21 TO 30 

MiLLEB, W. J. ; Pegmatite, silexlte, and apUte dikes of nortben New York SO, 93 

— ; Pre-Glacial course of the upper Hudson River 22, 64, 177-186 

— , Quartz-hornblende syenite described by 27, 215 

— , Remarks on anthropoid by 27, 150 

recent eruptions of Lassen Peak, California, by 26, 105 

rectilinear features of Adirondacks by 27, 107 

MiiXEB bay, west lake Okoboji, Iowa, Shells dredged from 21, 22 

MiLLiNGTON, J., Geological work in Mississippi of 25, 170 

MiLivs, John, Origin of Alaskan earthquakes, 1889, located from seismo- 
graph by 21, 376 

— , Reference to report on Alaskan earthquakes 21, 375 

— and BuBTON, W. K. ; Photographs of Neo Valley (Japan) earthquake 

faults, Reference to 22, 173 

MiLODONT sloth of Rancho La Brea 26, 143 

MiNAS Oksaes, Geology of 30, 263 

Mineral deposits in unaltered Paleozoic sediments. Organic origin of 

some 26, 85 

— hydroxides of iron, Definition and determination of 27, 61 

— nomenclature, Suggestion for 28, 51, 729 

— (Some) relations from the laboratory viewpoint; Arthur L. Day... 21,32, 

. 141-178 

— Resources Bureau of London 30, 100 

of the world. Commercial control of the ., 30, 108 

— wealth. World view of 30, 107 

MiNEBAiXMic, Economic and Petrologic Section, Papers relating to.. 21,32-34 

Mineralogy, Note on a method in teaching optical ; F. W. McNair 21, 31 

Minerals, Economic limits to domestic independence in 30, 98 

— from Maine 29, 463 

— from the Favas of Brazil ; Oliver Cummings Farrington 23, 37, 728 

ore deposits at Park City, Utah; F. R. Van Horn 25,47 

— in melting. Individuality of different 21, 146 

Pennsylvania, Precambrian 29, 378 

the Adirondacks. 29, 399 

Wisconsin 29,393 

— of BrazU 30, 324 

— (secondary) and etching phenomena produced by hot circulating solu- 

tions 26. 275 

MiNOAN and Antlcosti islands. Fossil of 21, 678-716 

, Ordovicic-Siluric section of 21,677-716 

, Paleozoic strata of 21, 681 

— formation, Correlations of 21, 692 

, Thickness and general characteristics of 21. 688 

, Zones and description of 21, 689-693 

— islands, Beekmantown deposits s^en in 21,683 

, Comparative age of Fort Cassin beds. Lake Champlain area, and 

Beekmantown strata of 21, 688 

, Ordovicic system, Chazian and Mohawkian series 21, 688 



MINQAN — MISSISSIPPI 191 

Pagt 

MiNOAN islands, Stratigraptaic sequence from Quebec shore to 21, 682 

succession, Canadic system, Beekmantown series 21, 686-688 

Mingo County, West Virginia, Coal beds in , 29,96 

Mining laws of Brazil 30, 334 

Minneapolis meeting for considering organization of a geological society. 

Final committee appointed at 21, 744 

the advancement of science, August, 1883, Report of committee 

on establishment of a geological society and a geological magaskine 

to : 21, 744 

, Geologists present at 21, 744 

Minnesota, Barite deposits of 28, 132 

— , Earth-movements in 25, 34 

— , Glacial Investigations in 1911 in 23, 46, 732 

— , Pleistocene deposits of 27, 68 

— , Section at Saint Paul 26, 267 

MiNNEWANKA Lake section, Alberta, Spiriferoids of the 24, 112, 233-239 

MiNBHAi.1^, F. W., cited on petroleum 28, 555 

Miocene and Oligocene faunas of California, Review of the ; B. L. Clark 

26, 416 

— - deposits. Pinnipeds from 29, 161 

— dolphin from California ; R. S. Lull 25, 142 

— Eocene relationships on West Coast 29, 307 

— floras 30, 534 

of western United States : correlation with those of other Miocene 

areas 26, 416 

— igneous rocks and thermal waters 22, 106 

— -, Introductory remarks on correlation of ; II. F. Osbom 26, 415 

~- iiiamnialian fauna from Tehachapl region 27, 170 

faunas of western United States to those of Europe and Asia, Rela- 
tion of the ; W. D. Matthew 26, 416 

— of Nebraska, New camel from the 22, 95 

the Muir syncline 25, 154 

southern Coast Range region of California, Some general fea- 
tures of the 22, 72 

Washington-Oregon province and its relation to that of Califor- 
nia and other Miocene areas ; C. L. Weaver 26, 416 

West Indian Islands 29, 624 

Washington, Lower 25, 153 

— sea of the West Coast, Lower 29, 301 

Mississippi basin. System of Quaternary lakes in the 22, 66, 732 

~, Colorado, and Columbia rivers. Source of 22, 104 

— eiubayment, lieference to 25, 170 

— , Geological work in 25, 170 

— limestone containing lluorite discussed by W. A. Tarr 29, 104 

— River, New development at the mouth of '. . 21, 791 

, Saving the silts of 28, 149 

— silts discussed by A. C. Lane 28, 151 

B. W. Shaw 28,150 



192 J. STANLEY-BROWN INDEX TO VOLUMES 21 TO 30 

Page 
Mississippi Valley, lioes-s in 27. 82 

, Mlssisslppian formations of the upper 29» 03 

M1SSI88IPPIAN delta in the northern New River district of Virginia 23t 48, 

447-455, 743 

— floras SO, 510 

— formations, Revision of 29, 93 

— limestone of Wasatch Mountains, A non-marine memher in 21, 528 

— rhynchonelloid shells, Internal characters of some 21, 76, 498-516 

— sands as source of oil 28, 674 

— section in west-central Kentucky ; Charles Butts 27, 155 

— shales, Wasatch Mountains show wide distribution of 21, 529 

Missouri and Illinois, Stratigraphy and paleontology of the Alexandrian 

series in 24, 111, 351-375 

— , Devonian fishes of 24, 119 

formations in 27, 160 

of central 26, 112, 156 ; 28, 209 

— , Geologic section near Columbia 28, 170 

— , Grassy Creek shale of 29, 95 

— lead and zinc deposits, Genesis of 29, 86 

— , Ijower Kinderhookian faunas of 29, 93 

— , Natural bridge in Green County 21, 329 

Miller County 21, 332 

— , Occurrence of glauconlte in 29, 104 

— , Paleogeography of 29, 71 

— , Paleozoic faunas in 25, 135 

— River, Pleistocene valley of 27, 299 

Valley, Reference by A. G. Leonard to 27, 295 

— , Zinc and lead deposits discussed by members 29, 86 

Mitchell, E., State Geologist of North Carolina 25, 160 

Mitchell, G. J. ; Evidence of recent changes of level in Porto Rico, as 

shown by studies in the Ponce district 29, 138 

MiXTECA Alta, Origin of the Liassic flora of the 24, 115 

MoBEBG, J. C, cited on graptoltte horizons 28, 961 

origin of petroleum 28, 728 

Ordovicic in Jamtland 27,608 

of Scania 27, 612-617 

— , Reference to "Silurian of Sweden" of 27, 603, 608, 611 

studies pursued under 27, 611 

Mode of fonnation of certain gneisses in the highlands of New Jersey; 

C. N. Fenner 25, 44 

MoEL Tryfaen, Wales, Reference to deposits found in 25, 210-211 

MoENKOPi formation 30, 493 

Mobicke, W., cited on Navidad fauna 29, 642 

MoFTiT, F. H., Reference to "Headwater regions of Gulkana and Susltna 

rivers, Alaska," of 27, 697 

"The Kotsina-Kushulana district, Alaska," of 27,694 

— and Baoley, J. W. ; A method of aerial topographic mapping 30, 110 



MOPPIT MONTANA 1 93 

Page 

MoFFiT, F. H., and Capps, S. R., Reference to "Geology and mineral re- 
sources of the Nizina district, Alaska," of 27, 691-692, 695 

— and Knopf, Adolph, Reference to "Mineral resources of the Nahesna- 

White River district, Alaska," of 27, 696 

Mohave Desert region, Pleistocene fauna of the 25, 156 

Mohawk glacial lobe ; Albert Perry Brlgham 22, 64, 183, 725 

— Valley glacial features 25, 209 

, Iroquois shore and higher terraces in the 24, 219 

MoHN, H., cited on method devised for gravity correction of the quick- 
silver barometer 26, 183 

MoHR, E. C. J., cited on mechanical analyses of sedimedts 28, 927 

MoJAVE Desert area, Tertiary fauna of 29, 162 

Mojsifiovics, Edmund von, cited on fossils of Karnic age 27, 707 

— ; Die Dolomit-Riffe von Stidtirol und Venetien, Reference to 22, 161 

— , Reference to "Arktische Triasfaunea" of 27, 716 

"BeitrS.ge zur Kenntniss der obertriadisohen Cephalopoden- 

Faunen des Himalaya" of 27, 707, 709 

"Ueber einige japanische Triasfossilien" of 27, 715 

MoLDAViTE question ; George P. Merrill 22, 67, 736 

MOLDAVITES 26, 280 

MoLENGBAAFF, G. A. F., cited on deep-sea deposits on Timor 27, 192 

island subsidence 29, 511 

MoixuscA of the Carrizo Creek beds and their Caribbean affinities ; R. E. 

Dickerson 29, 148 

MoLLUSCAN faunas from Deadmans Island ; T. S. Oldroyd 27, 173 

MOLLUSKS, Aftonian 21, 121, 132* 

MoNAziTE in North Carolina, New occurrence of ; Joseph Hyde Pratt 24, 54, 686 

Mongolia, Inclosed lakes of 25, 563 

Monilipara prosseri. Fossil of Wasatch region 21, 530 

Monks Mound, Additional note on 29, 80 

Monocline and homocline 27, 89 

MoNODACTYLous Plioccne horse 27, 151 

>IoNONOAHELA formation of Maryland 30, 574 

MoNTAONE Noire, southern France 27, 583 

Montana, Alberta Belly River beds eciuivalent to Judith River beds of 

Dog Creek and Cow Island 26, 149 

— , Algal and bacterial deposits in the Algonkian Mountains of 26, 148 

— and Alberta topographic development, Reason of difference in 24, 533 

Idaho, Glaciation in 23,524 

— beds, Flora of the 25, 332 

— , Conglomerate of 25, 346 

— , Correlation of the Upper Cretaceous in 28, 216 

— , Cretaceous-Eocene correlation in 25, 355 

— , Eocene in 29, 89 

— epoch, Crustal oscillations during the 25, 344 

, Oscillating movements in 25, 346 

— , Glacial erosion in -. 25, 86 

'— .— Lake Missoula of 25, 87 

XIII — Bull. Oeol. See. Am. 



194 J. STANLKY-BROWN INDEX TO VOLUMES 21 TO 30 

Montana, Jurassic erosion surface in 28, 161 

— , Livingston formation of 2S5, 346 

— , New facts bearing on the Paleozoic stratigraphy of the region about 

Three Forks 26, 157 

— , Oligocene plant fossils of 29, 147 

— , Origin of Cliff lake 21, 26, 764 

— , Peneplains in Browning and Blackfoot quadrangles 24, 532, 566 

— phosphate deposits 27, 62 

— , Pleistocene deposits in 28, 149 

near Sage Creek 24, 571 

— . Pre- Wisconsin glacial drift in the region of Glacier Park.. .24,71,529,572 

— , Stratigrnphic relations of the Livingston beds of central 21, 31, 781 

— , Wisconsin stage of glaciation and the third set of plains in 24, 535 

Monterey series. Fauna of the 26, 151 

on the south side of Mount Diablo, California ; W. S. Kew and 

U. C. Stoner 24, 123 

^shales of the San Jos^ and Mount Hamilton quadrangles, Thickness 

of 24, 96 

MoNTKSus DE Baltx>re, F. dk, dtcd on Alaskan earthquakes 21, 397 

date Alaskan earthquake 21, 341 

— ; La Science Scisniologique, Reference to 22, 145 

Montien beds 25, 336 

. - deposits 25, 342 

-- stage. Reference to 25, 321 

MoNTicuLiPOROiDS, Development of the 23, 84, 357-367 

— , Morphology and histologj' of the Treiwstomata or 26, 158, 349-374 

Montreal meeting, 1882, Official report of the Cincinnati meeting at. . 21, 743 
for considering question of organizing an American Geological So- 
ciety, List of persons present at 21, 743 

of the American Association for the Advancement of Science Au- 
gust, 1882,' at 21, 743 

-- River, Diversion of the 21, 21, 762 

Monument Creek group and its relations to the Denver and Arapahoe 

formations ; George B. Richardson 23, 36, 267-276 

MoNzoNiTE, Comparison of syenite with quartz "27, 204 

MoNZONiTES, Analyses of quartz 27, 205 

MooDiE, R. L. ; Diseases of the mosasaurs 29, 147 

— made member of Committee on Nomenclature 28, 973 

— ; Scaled amphibia of the Coal Measures 26, 154 

Moody, C. Lt ; Fauna of the Fernando formation of Los Angeles, Cali- 
fornia 28, 234 

— , Inquiries by : 25, 125 

— ; Succession of Miocene faunas in the John Day region 28, 215 

— , Merriam, John C, and Stock, Chester ; Fauna of the rodeo Pleisto- 
cene 27, 169 

MooK, C. C, cited on Morrison formation 29, 249, 251 

239 titles listed in the bibliography of the Morrison formation. 26,299 



MOOK — MORRIS 195 

Page 
MooK, C. C. ; Criteria for the termination of species in the Sauropods, 

with description of a new species of Apatosaurus 27> 151 

— ; Geologic exposure of the Morrison 26, 151 

— ; Notes on Oamaraaaurus Cope 25, 143 

— ; Origin and distribution of the Morrison 26, 315-322 

— , Remarks on DiplodocuB and Apatosaurus by 27, 153 

pelvis proportions by 27, 151 

— ; Skeleton and restoration of Camarasaurus 28. 215 

— and OsBOBN, H. F. ; Camarasaurus, Amphicoelias, and other sauropods 

of Cope 30, 379 

; Camarasaurus and Amphiccelias from CaiSon City 30, 151 

MooRE, B. S. ; Algal limestone on the Belcher Islands, Hudson Bay 29, 128 

— cited on oolites 25, 761-762 

— ; Iron formation on Belcher Islands, Hudson Bay, with special refer- 
ence to its origin and its associated algal limestones 29, 90 ' 

— ; Oolite and pisolitic barite from the Saratoga oil field of Texas 25, 77 

— ; "Pele's Tears" and their bearing on the origin of australites 27, 51 

— , Sediments of Center County, Pennsylvania, discussed by 24, 112 

MooBE, F. M., Reference to geological work of 25, 166 

MooKE, R. C, Reference to war work of 30, 180 

— and Van Tuyl, F. M. ; Late Mississippian orogenic movements in 

North America 30. 88 

Moose nose and Oak hummock, Winnipeg, Esker and kame deposits of. . 

21. 424-427 

MoBAiNE, structure of Bethlehem 27, 272 

— , Topography of Bethlehem 27, 271 

— , Trend of Bethlehem 27, 273 

Moraines and eskers of the last glaciation in the White Mountains; 

W. Upham 27, 265 

— in the Adirondacks 27, 650 

— of New York State, Marginal 24, 146 

Ontario and western New York, Recent studies of the 23, 46 

MoBAN, Robert W. ; Ventura County oil fields 24, 97 

MoRET, G. W. ; Hydrous silicate melts 29, 102 

— ; Importance of water as a magma tic constituent ^ . . . 27, 50 

Morgan, C. L., cited on pillow lavas 25, 605 

Morgan formation, Wasatch region. Composition and fossils of . . . 21, 529, 530 

MoRLEY, E. W., Analyses by 27, 207, 215 

— , Analysis of Adirondack rocks by 25, 251 

MoRLOT, A. YON, cited on metamorphism 28, 379 

Moropus cooki. Skeleton in the American Museum of 29, 131 

— elatus Marsh, Skull of ; W. J. Holland 22, 94 

MoROZEWicz, Josef, cited on igneous rocks 29, 185 

Morphology, Contributions from paleontology to; William Bullock 

Clark 21, 74 

MoRBEY, C. B., cited on origin of oil 28, 731 

Morris, C, cited on respiratory organ of amphibian 27, 418 



196 J. STAXLEY-UROVVN INDEX TO VOLUMES 21 TO 30 

Page 
Morris, C, Reference to "The origin of lungs, a chapter in evolution," 

by 27, 418 

MoRRisox: an initial Cretaceous formation; W. T. Lee... 26,90,151,303-314 

— assigned to Lower Cretaceous 26, 313 

— , Character of the .' 26, 308 

— , Conclusions and references on the 26, 313 

— , Distribution and thickness of the 26, 316 

— , Equivalent and associates of the 26, 307 

— fauna and flora, List of investigators of the 26, 300 

— . Fauuol consideration of the 26, 304 

— formation ns determined by associated marine fauna. Time limits of 

the 26. 347 

compared with other formations 29, 246-248 

, Criteria for determining the origin of the 26, 317 

, Extension into New Mexico of 26, 113 

, Names applied to the 29, 248 

— of America, Age of 29, 245 

— , Geologic ex|)osure of the 26, 151 

— , Invertebrate fauna of the 26, 90, 151, 343-348 

— , List of species of animals and plants named from 26, 299 

--, Names formerly used for the 26, 315 

— . Origin and distribution of the 26, 90, 315-322 

— , Physical considerations of the 26, 310 

— , Pliysiographic conditions of the 26, 310 

— Sauropoda and Stegosaqria compare<l with tho.se of South America, 

England, and East Africa 26, 90, 151, 323-334 

— , Structural relations of the 26, 309 

Morton, S. G., Geological work by 26, 100 

— in Georgia by 25, 173 

MoRVAN, Colorado Front Range is a 23, 118 

MoRVANs of different kinds 23, 117 

MoBASAURS, Diseases of * 29. 147 

Mother of Coal and its relation to the process of coal formation. Nature 

of the substance known as 24, 75, 7iri 

MoucHEZ, E. ; Les c6tes du Brdsil, third edition, Uefcrence to 22, 197 

MouLTON, F. U., cited on earth heat 30, 542 

Mounds and their origin discussed by members 29« 81 

Mount Diablo, California, Monterey series and San Pablo formation of. 

24, 129, 130 

— Hamilton and San Jos6 quadrangles, General geology of^ 24, 96 

— Holyoke, Announcement of fire at 29, 84 

— Katahdin, Evidence of continental glaciation on: G. C. Curtis 26, 7S 

— Morgan, Red Beds near 21, 529 

, Utah, Location of 21, 529 

— Ranier, Level of maximum prei'ii)itation as a factor in the glaciation 

of 24, 72, 701 

— Toby, Cirques and rock-cut terraces of 22, 681 

, Location of 22, 681 



MOUNT MURRAY 197 

Page 
Mount Wasliingtoii, Glacial cirques near 24, 51, 677 

Mountain glaciation, Iceland groupH of 21, 718 

, Montana, Time and extent of the first 24, 539 

MouNTAiN-PBODUciNG forces, Notes on 23, 71 

Mountain, Type of rifted relict mountain or rift 26, 90 

Mountains, Basin-range type of 21, 543, 544 

— In New Mexico, Structure of some 29, 72 

— of the desert region, Changed views of origin of 21. 544 

Moi^NTED skeleton of Bl<istoccrint pampauH — a fossil deer from Argen- 
tina ; W. D. Matthew 27, 153 

CanU dims, with remarks on the methods of reconstruction of 

extinct animals ; W. D. Matthew 27, 153 

Mounting of rock and fossil specimens with sulphur; C. A. Reeds 25, 13(1 

MouREU, Chables, and Lepape, A., cited on helium of Carnot Spring nt 

Sautenay (Ck)te-d'Or) 26, 193 

Mrazek, R. L., cited on "dlaplr structure" 28, 587 

oil-field geology 28, 555 

Muckebmann, Hermann, cited on ant-hills In western Wisconsin 21, 451 

MuDGE, B. F., cited on metamorphic rocks of Kansas 28, 419 

MuiB glacier. Reports of recession of 21, 368 

, Retreat of 25, 209 

— syncUne, Miocene oysters of the 25, 154 

Multiple glaciation in New York State 27, 647 

MuLTiTUBEBCULATA, New evldeuce of the affinities of ; Walter Granger. 26, 152 

— ; WUllam k. Gregory 23, 190 

Munieb-Chalmas cited on fossils of Tremadoc nge 27, 574 

MuNN, M. J., cited on anticlinal theory 28, 714 

Ohio oil field 28,570 

Tennessee oil 28, 649 

— elected Fellow 21, 4 

MuNTHE, H., Studies of Lake Venem country made by 27, 586 

MuBCHisoN, Sib R. T., cited on continental deposits 28, 742 

— Lower Silurian rocks 27, 557 

Ludlow bone bed. .• 27, 394 

"Primordial Silurian" 27, 557 

the Permian of Russia 27, 493 

MuBQOci, G., cited on climatic pulsations 25, 533 

Mubie, J., cited on anatomy of horse and tapir 26, 406 

MuBPHY, E. C, cited on transportation of debris by water 29, 185 

MuBBAY, Alexandeb, cltcd on marine Clinton beds 29, 334 

MuBBAY, Sib John, cited by Goodchild on areas of "inland drainage** in 

Britain 21, 652 

on chemical denudation 28, 835 

Island subsidence 29, 493 

oolites 25, 759 

sea deposits 28, 738 

sedimentation 28, 784 

— quoted on marine temperature 22, 241 



198 J. STANLEY-BROWN INDEX TO VOLUMES 21 TO 30 

Murray, Sir John, quoted on the influence of temperature on the secre- 
tion of calcium carbonate by marine organisms 22, 250 

— , Reference to his "Bathyraetrical chart of the oceans" 21, 200 

— and Renard, A-, Reference to Challenger report on deep-sea deposits 

of 21, 044 

Mutations and submutations among invertebrates 27, 148 

— , An illustration of Waagen's theory of 24, 109 

"— of Waagen" 26, 411 

and of De Vrles; H. F. Osbom 24,120 

" — " **mutations" of De Vries, or rectigradations of Osbom com- 
pared ; II. P. Osbom 22, 96 

richtung of Neumayr, mutents of De Vries : Relations of these 

phenomena in evolution ; Henry Fairfield Osbom 27, 148 

Muzo, Ck)Iombia, Emerald deposits of 27, 63 

Mylodont sloths of Rancho La Brea, Posterior foot of 27, 170 

Myvatu, Iceland, The obsidian near 26, 285 

N 

Nagexfluh of Quebec and Salzburg 26, 60 

Nansen, F., citM on temperature variations in Atlantic current 26, 493 

Nantucket, Absence of bars on 28, 285 

Narraoansett series. Divisions of 25, 447 

Nathorst, a. G., cited on fossil floras of Arctic 30, 559 

King Karl's land , SO, 520 

— , Studies of the Lake Venem country made by 27, 586 

National Museum (new), Washington, D. C, Twenty-fourth Annual 

Meeting at the 23, 2 

— Research Council, Report of Geology Committee of 29, 09 

, Resolutions concerning 28, 123 

Natural bridge and natural arch, Difference between 21, 314 

across Kicking Horse River, Diagram of 21, 322 

, near Field, British Columbia, Description of and view 

showing 21, 321, 322 

Swifts Camp Creek, Description of and diagram indicating origin 

of 21, 315 

, View showing 21, 315 

at Attica, Indiana 21, 317 

Natural Bridge station, Powell County, Kentucky, Description 

of and views showing 21, 324, 325 

, Definition of 21, 314 

formed by gravity, Big Horn Mountains, Wyoming, View showing 21, 331 

, Diagram showing 21, 333 

in Bad Lands, South Dakota, Description of 21, 315, 316 

, View showing 21, 315 

North Adams, Massachusetts, Description of, view showing... 21,328 

^,Ix)okout Mountain, Tennessee, Description of and view showing.. 

21, 327, 329 



NATURAL NEBRASKA 199 

Page 

Natural bridge, Miller County, Missouri, Description of 21, 333 

near Pine, Arizona, Description of 21, 335, 336 

of Buffalo Gap, South Dakota, Description of 21. 320 

Jje Perle Creek, Wyoming, Description of 21, 320 

the Emnie Valley, Switzerland, Description of. View showing. . 21, 334 

, Oklahoma, Description of 21, 327 

over Lamville River, Vermont, Description of and view showing.. 

21,321,322 

, Perch River, Section of (after Ruedemann ) 21, 330 

, Petrified log 21. 323-325 

, Virginia 21, 327 

, Yellowstone National Park 21, 322 

— bridges by stream ' erosion 21, 314-326 

, Catalog of North American 21, 337, 338 

, Formation of, from the "Remains of a great cavern." Diagram in- 
dicating (Shaler) 21, 330 

formed by pot-hole action 21, 321 

, Green County, Missouri, Description of 21. 329 

in western Oklahoma 21, 333 

initiated by solution 21, 327-333 

wave action 21, 326, 327 

, JefTerson County, New York 21, 332 

of Florida, Description of. .: 21, asi 

Jackson County, Iowa, Description of 21, 332 

North America ; Ilerdman F. Cleland 21. 22, 314-338, 768 

San Juan County, Utah, Description of and views showing. 21,317-321 

southeastern Utah, Directions for reaching 21. 317 

the Taina Vallej', Switzerland 21,a^S 

, Travertine-cemented 21, 323 

— gas and its control, R. A. Geary well 24. 279 

at Cleveland, Ohio; F. R. Van Horn 26, 102 

— water. New classification of 24, 73 

Xatube of the substance known as Mother of Coal and its relation to the 

process of coal formation ; Edward C. Jeffrey 24, 75. 715 

later deformations in certain ranges of the Great Basin; C. L. 

Baker 25, 122 

Xaumawn, C. F., cited on metamorphism 28, 378-379 

origin of pillow lavas 25, 637 

pillow lavas 25, 595-696 

Xavajo-Moki reservation, Preliminary geological map of the ; Herbert E. 

Gregory 24, 53. 680 

Navidad fauna 29, 642 

Nebbaska, Amphibian from the Tertiary of 28, 213 

— and Iowa fossiliferous sand and gravel beds. Evidence they are Afto- 

nian 21, 31 

— Eurypterids ; E. H. Barbour 24, 113 

— , Geological tour of ^ 28, 197 

— , Homed Artidactyl of 28, 211 



200 J. STANLEY-BROWN INDEX TO VOLUMES 21 TO 30 

Page 

Nebraska, New Plesiosaurian genus from the Niobrara Cretaceous of. 24, 129 

— , Plant tissue in the Carboniferous shales of 24, 113 

— , Tertiary formations of 28, 197 

Nebbasran drift. Name given to the pre-Kansan or sub-Aftonian 21, 128 

of the Little Sioux Valley, in northwest Iowa ; J. E. Carman. . 23, 47, 735 

Necboloqy 28. 13 ; 29, 12 ; 30, 147 

Neill, Patrick, Reference to "Tour" by 27, 375 

Nelson, E. W., cited on geology of the Bahamns and coral formations. 21, 646 

Nelsok River section 30, 346 

Nelsonite: a new rock type, its occurrence, association, and composi- 
tion ; T. L. Watson and S. Taber 21, 33 

Neocene of California, Tentative correlation table of the; B. L. Clark. 26, 167 
Neocolemanite, a variety of colemanite and howllte from Lang, Los 

Angeles County, California ; Arthur S. Eakle 23, 70 

Nepheune syenite (miaskose) in Virginia, Megascopic and microscopic 

character of and chemical composition and classification of. 24,314-316 

Nephelite syenite, Areas of 21, 90 

Neumann, R., cited on Peruvian fossils 29, 611 

Neumayb, Melchior, cited on tanmonites 32, 520 

monoclines 27, 91 

— , Evolutionary relationship of mutations richtung of 27, 148 

Nevada, Fossil footprints near Carson 28, 226 

— , Gypsum and anhydrite from the Ludwig^mine, Lyon County 24,94 

— Hills, Geology of the 23, 74 

— , Iron-ore deposits at Barth 24, 96 

— , Mammalian jaw from the Truckee beds of western 29, 161 

— , Platinum-gold lode deposit in southern 26, 85 

— , Stibnite at Steamboat Springs 25, 126 

New accessions to the Exhibition series at Yale Museum; R. S. Lull. . 25, 143 

— Artiodactyls from the Upper Eocene of the Uinta Basin, Utah ; O. A. 

Peterson 29, 153 

— bathymetrical map of the West Indies region ; C. A. Reeds 29, 142 

— Brunswick, Marine levels in 29, 220 

, Pillow lava of 25, 611 

— England, Bibliography of Pleistocene geology 30, 632 

coastal region, Post-glacial uplift of 30, 89 

, Distribution of allauite in 28,467 

, Post-glacial uplift of southern 30, 597 

upland in the White Mountains, Position of 27, 108 

— Eurypterid horizon ; G. H. Chadwick 30, 152 

— genera of corals of the family of Cyathophy llida* ; A. W. Grabau . . . 28, 199 

New Guinea, Petroleum supply of 28, 615 

New Hampshire, Distribution of allanite In 28, 469 

, Garnetiferous hornblende schist of 25, 75 

, Glacial phenomena in 29, 195, 209 

, Gladation in White Mountains of 27, 67, 263 

, Late Pleistocene shoreline in 29, 74 

, Notes on the structural geology of the Hanover district 24, 50, 672 



NEW NEW 20 1 

Page 

Xew Haven, Connecticut, Peat deposit near 24, 72, 700 

New Jersey, Distribution of allanite in 28, 471 

gneisses, Mode of formation of 25, 44 

, Pillow lavas of 25, 623 

, Silurian formations in 27, 531 

, Submergence of 29, 188 

New mastodon find in Connecticut ; R. 8. Lull 25, 143 

— method of restoring eotitanoi>s and brintotherium ; H. F. Osbom 25, 140, 406 
New Mexico and Colorado, Coal-bearing rocks of the Raton Mesa region 

of 24, 114 

, Relation of Cretaceous formations to the Roclcy Mountains in. . 

26, 114, 156 

western Texas, Notes on the upper carlwuiferous in southeast. 21,76 

, Certain structural features in the coal fields of 26, 405 

coal-bearing strata, Deposition of 25, 345 

, Cretaceous- Eocene correlation in , 25, 355 

, Deposit of gypsum sand near Almogordo 21, 647 

, Descriptive details of fossils, coal fields, rock measurements, etc. . 

23, 615-659 

, Eocene faunal horizons in 28, 216 

, Extension of Morrison formation into ; N. 11. Darton 26, 113 

. "Laramie?" Puerco and Torrejon of 25, 138 

, TiOwer Paleozoic yock of southern 28, 172 

, Mammal-bearing beds of. 25, 325 

, Post-Cretaceous floras of 25, 334 

, Record of rainfall in 25, 535 

, Red Beds of 25, 81 

, Reference to dinosaur fauna of 25, 323 

, Sedimentary succession In 27, 86 

, Stratigraphy of the coal fields of northern central 23, 571-686 

, Structure of some mountains in 29, 72 

New Miocene mammalian fauna from the Tehachapi region; John P. 

Buwalda 27, 170 

— IX)int in the geology of the Adirondacks ; J. F. Kemp 25, 47 

— points in Ordovician and Silurian paleogeography ; T. E. Savage and 

F. M. Van Tuyl 20, 88 

— species of the Mesonacidie, with twenty-nine rudimentary segments 

posterior to the fifteenth ; Lancaster D. Burling 27, 158 

— test of the subsidence theory of coral reefs ; R. A. Daly 28, 151 

— TilUdont skull from the Huerfano Basin, Colorado ; Walter Granger 29, 147 

— titanotheres from Uinta formation of Utah ; O. A. Peterson 25, 144 

New York Academy of Sciences and the insular government, Explora- 
tions In Porto Rico supported by 26, 113 

and Ontario, The Cataract: a new formation at the base of the 

Siluric in 24, 107 

Clinton 29, 327 

^ Columbia County, Richmond boulder train in 21, 747 

, Devonic black shale of 25, 127 



202 J. STANLEY-BROWN INDEX TO VOLUMES 21 TO 30 

Page 

New York, Devonic fossils from '. 30, 426-464 

, Dikes of northern '. SO, 93 

, Distribution of allanite in 28, 470 

, Fish fauna of the conodout bed at Eighteen-mile Creek 26, 154 

, Foliation of Precambrian rocks of northern 27, 57 

, Glacial erosion in the Genesee Valley and its bearing on the Ter- 
tiary drainage problem of eastern 24, 76, 718 

phenomena in 29, 107 

, Hamilton group of western 26, 113, 158 

hanging valleys, Pre-Glacial equivalents of 23, 483 

, Limestone shale and gypsum beds of 28, 131 

, Lockport-Guelph section at Rochester 28, 172 

, Magnetic iron-ore deposits of 30, 83 

, Medina, Cataract formations of 26, 277 

, Moraines of western 23, 46 

, Natural bridges of Jefferson County 21, 332 

, Oil development in 28, 622 

field of 28, 591 

, Peccaries of the Pleistocene of 26, 150 

, Pleistocene uplift of 27. 66, 235 

, Portage stratigraphy in western 30, 157 

, Post-Ordovician deformation in the Saint Lawrence Valley 26, 115. 

287-294 

, Preglacial drainage of central western 21, 31 

, Reference to climatic changes in 25, 482 

, Serpentine of Staten Island 25, 87 

, Sherburne sandstone in 30, 423 

, Silurian formations of southeastern 27, 531 

Siluric, Further study in 29, 92 

sections in 25, 304-320 

. Sketch map of eastern central , 25, 69 

State, Lauren tian (Labradorian) ice-body in 24, 135-137 

Museum, Important Pleistocene publications of 24, 162 

, Outline map of 27,235 

, Pleistocene formations of ; Herman L. Fairchild 24, 54, 132 

Survey, Work of the 24, 162 

, Thrust-faults in eastern 28, 160 

, Tully limestone and Genesee shale of 28, 207 

, VTaterlimes of 28, 173 

New Zealand, Average elevation of mountain uplands in 21, 720 

, Marine Triassic invertebrate fauna from 27, 172 

, Petroleum supply of 28, 615 

Newark series, Labyrinthodont from the 28, 213 

— systems, Relations of Maryland and eastern North America 30, 155 

Newbebry, J. S., cited on "cycles of deposition" 27, 493 

Honduras fossils 29, 608 

oil 28, 626 

oolitic iron ores 25, 770 



NEWBERRY NILE 203 

Pmg* 

Nbwbebbt, J. 8., cited on petroleum 28t 555 

— quoted on Berea grit 26, 205 

Newcomb, Simon, cited on solar heat 26, 486, 499 

sun-spot cycle 28, 825 

Newfoundland, Algonkian rocks of 25, 40 

— , Altitudes of east coast of 29, 204 

— , Cambrian and Ordovician faunas of 25, 138 

— coast. Changes in elevation of 29, 226 

— , Fossil algjB of the Ordovician iron ores of Wabana 26, 148 

— , Manganese deposits of 25, 73 

— , Pillow lavas of i 25, 611 

— , Wabana iron ores of 25, 74 

Newland, D. H., cited on allanite 28, 465, 470 

New York Clinton 29,329 

oolitic iron ore 25, 768 

— ; Iiandslides in unconsolidated sediments 27, 58 

— , Illustrations of the deformation of limestone under regional com- 
pression 28, 163 

Nbwsom , J. F., and Branneb, J. C. ; The Red River and Clinton mono- 
clines. Reference to 22, 151 

Newton, E. T., cited on the preparietal 28, 982 

Niagaba district, Forest glen and olden epochs of 21, 437 

— Falls, Fluctuations of 21, 447, 448 

, Partial drainage of, in February, 1909; J. W. Spencer... 21,26,447-448 

, Rate of recession of American 21, 441-443 

, Recession of 27, 78 

— Crorge and their correlation with Great Lakes history, Characters of 

the older sections of the ; Frank B. Taylor 24, 72, 702 

section 25, 308 

, Time measures in the 25, 35 

— group of Hall, Rochester shale fauna 24, 381 

— limestone, Great Lakes basins in their relationship to the 24, 76, 229 

" — period," J. D. Dana extended term "Niagara group" to 21, 680 

— , Relative work of the two falls of (extempore) ; J. W. Spencer. . 21, 22, 763 

— River, Relationship to the glacial period of the ; J. W. Spencer 21, 26 

, Studies of the Whirlpool- Saint Davids Valley 21, 433 

Niaoaban (Anticostian) series, Anticosti island 21, 704-716 

NiCABAOUA, Age of the igneous locks of 23, 516 

— , Geological reconnaissance in northeastern ; Oscar H. Hershey 23, 36, 

75, 493-516 

— pre-volcanic sedimentaries 23, 515 

— , Quaternary deposits and formations in 23, 497-508 

— Tertiary rocks 23, 508-514 

NicHOL, WiujAM, Reference to work of 28, 736 

Nicholson, H. A., cited on oolitic rock 25, 748 

Nicholson, H. C, Paleontology of the province of Ontario quoted from 23, 371 

Niebmeteb, J. F., cited on atolls 29, 527 

Nile and Rhine deltas 23, 387 



204 J. STANLEY-BROWN ^INDEX TO VOLUMES 21 TO 30 

NiLES, WiLLiAic Harmon, Memoir of, by George II. Barton 22, 8 

NioBBARA Cretaceous of Nebraska, New Pleslosanrinn genus from the. 24, 120 

— limestone 25, 345 

NivATiON as an erosive factor In northern Greenland, Importance of.. . 29,72 

NoATAK basin, Alaska 23, 567 

Noble, L. F., cited on Supai red shales 30, 491 

NoETLiNO, E^iTZ, Reference to "Die asiatlsche Trias*' of 27f 715 

NoLiNEiE of the West Indies 29, 651 

Nomenclature of faults, Geological and physiographic 24, 187 

, Preliminary report of the Committee on tlie 23, 50 

, Principles guiding the 24, 164 

;H. F. Reid 23,74 

, Report acc^ted for publication in Bulletin, together with dis- 
cussion on 24, 49 

of Committee on 24,49,163 

minerals ; A. F. Rogers 25, 124 

surface forms on faulted structures ; W. M. Davis 24, 187-215 

the skull elements in. the Tetrapoda 27, 152 

— , Plea for uniformity and simplicity in petrologlc ; G. M. Butler 26, 134 

— , Report of Committee on Geological 26, 57 

structure, and classification of the Cremacrinida? ; E. O. 

Ulrich 24, 109 

— , Suggestion for mineral 23, 51. 729 

NoMLAND, J. O. ; Corals from the Cretaceous and Tertiary of California 

and Oregon 27, 174 

— ; Fauna of the Etchegoin Pliocene of middle California 28, 229 

— ; Relationships of the invertebrates to the vertebrate fauna 1 zones of 
the Pliocene Jacalitos and Etchegoin formations at Coalinga, Cali- 
fornia 27, 172 

Nonnezoshi natural bridge, Utah, Discovered by Utah archaeological ex- 
pedition 21, 318 

XoBiTE, Chemical composition and classification of 27» 229 

— , Description of 27. 227 

— , Discussion of characteristics and distribution of 27, 225 

— , pyroxenite, and pyrrotite from Litchfield, Connecticut ; Ernest Howe 26, 83 

North Adams, Massachusetts, Marble natural bridge in 21, 328 

North America and Europe, Comparison of the late Pleistocene fauna 

of 24, 120 

, Avian paleontology from Pacific coast of 24, 132 

, Close of Jurassic and opening of Cretaceous time in 26, 295 

, Early Paleozoic delta deix)8lts of 24, 409-528 

, Edentate deposits of 29, 161 

, Eocene pseudotapirs of 29, 152 

, Fresh-water fish faunas of 29, 138 

, Late Mississippian orogenic movements in 30, 88 

, Map showing locality of five great earthquakes of 2I, 342 

, Marine Ollgocene of 29, 153, 297 

, Mesozoic floras of 29, 129, 607 



NORTH NOTHARCTUS 205 

Page 

North America, Mesozoic reptiles of 29, 138 

, Newark system of eastern 30, 155 

, Paleozoic floras of 29, 129 

oolites of. 29, 102 

^. Petroleum supply of 28, 610 

, Relation of, to Eurasia 21,201-205 

, Revision of Paleozoic system of (part II) 22, 63, 289-680 

, Wilcox Eocene flora of 29, 632 

— American continent in Upper Devonic time ; A. W. Grabau 26, 88 

Cretaceous and Eocene, Contact between 25, 342 

natural bridges, Catalog of 21,337,338 

North Carolina, Distribution of allanite In 28, 477 

, Geological Survey created in 25, 160 

f New occurrence of monazite in 24, 54, 686 

North Dakota, Lance formation of 25, 348 

. Outline map of 27, 297 

, Photographs of Pleistocene valleys in 27, 299 

, Pleistocene drainage changes in 27, 295 

— in 27, 80 

North Peak, Plant-bearing beds of 25, 333 

Northeastern America, Post-Glacial uplift of 29, 187 

Northern Greenland, Importance of nivation as an erosive factor and 

soil flow as a transporting agency in 29, 72 

— Leeward Islands, Physiographic features of 27, 41 

Northumberland (New York) Volcanic Plug; H. P. Cushing 24,335-349 

— Volcanic Plug, Location, history, and description 24, 335, 336 

Norton, E. G., cited on origin of Louisiana salines 28, 585 

Norton, W. H., cited on glaciated rock surfaces near Linn and near 

Quarry, Iowa 26, 70 

natural bridges 21, 329 

Norway, Biri limestone of 27, 570 

— , Composition of allanite from 28, 482 

Note on the American Triassic genus Placerias lucas 25, 141 

Notes on Camar€tsauru8 Cope ; C. C. Mook 25, 143 

— — Eifel brachiopods ; C. H. Chadwick 29, 154 

the American Pliocene rhinoceroses ; W. D. Matthew 29, 153 

— evolution of the femoral trochanters in reptiles and mammals ; 

W. H. Gregory 29, 154 

geology of the region of Parker Snow Bay, Greenland; E. O. 

Hovey 29, 98 

occurrence of a mammalian jaw, presumably from the Truckee 

beds of western Nevada ; J. C. Jones ^ 29, 161 

separation of salt from saline water and mud ; E. M. Kindle. . . 29, 80 

-stratigraphy and faunas of the Lower Kinderhookian in Mis- 
souri ; E. B. Branson 29, 93 

Notharctus an Eocene lemur 24, 250 

. — and Lemuroldea, Bibliography of 26, 443 



206 J. STANLEY-BROWN INDEX TO VOLUMES 21 TO 30 

XoTHARCTUS Eocene lemur, Relationship to the Adapidse and to other 

primates of the 26, 49 

— , Skull and skeleton of 24, 251 

Nova Scotia, Barite deposits of Five Islands 21, 33, 786 

, Deformation of unconsolidated beds in 28, 163, 323 

, Glaciation in 29, 207 

, Marine levels In 29, 222 

Nugget sandstone, Subdivisions of Mesozoic 27, 70 

o 

Oahu, Nephelite and feldspar basalts of 21, 89 

— , Tertiary deposits of 23, 71 

rocks of 26. 133 

Oak hummock and Moose nose, Winnipeg, Esker and kame deposits of. . 

21, 424-427 
Obebun quadrangle, Ohio, Shorelines of the glacial lakes in the. . . 21, 21, 762 
Obsebvations on the skeletons of Mora pus cooki in the American Mu- 
seum ; H. F. Osborn 29, 131 

use of the percentage method in determining the age of Tertiary 

formations in California ; B. Martin 25, 152 

Obsebvatoby mountain, Ogden peak, synonymous with 21, 537 

Obsidian analyses according to methods of Cross, Iddings, Pirsson, and 

Washington 26, 262 

— from Hrafntinnuhryggur, Iceland, its lithophys® and surface mark- 

ings ; F. B. Wright 21, 32, 784 ; 26, 255-286 

OccuBBENCE and origin of white clays at Saylorsburg, Monroe County, 

Pennsylvania ; F. B. Peck 30, 96 

— of a large tourmaline in Alabama pegmatite; F. R, Van Horn 29, 104 

marine Middle Tertiary fauna on the western border of the Mo- 

jave Desert area ; Wallace Gordon 29. 162 

free gold in granodiorite of Siskiyou County of California; A. F. 

Rogers and E. S. Boundey 25, 124 

glacial drift on the Magdsilen Islands ; J. W. Goldthwait 25, 84 

intreformational conglomerate and breccia; F. V. Emerson 27,93 

mammalian remains at Rancho La Brea ; R. C. Stroner 25, 156 

Nothrotherium in Pleistocene cave deposits of California ; Chester 

Stock 28, 233 

stibnite and metastibnite at Steamboat Springs, Nevada; J. C. 

Jones 25, 126 

the Siphonalia autterenais zone, the uppermost Tejon horizon in 

the outer Coast Ranges of California ; R. E. Dickerson 29, 163 

Ocean, Present figure of 21, 222 

— temperatures 30, 545 

— water, Mean of seventy-seven analyses of 22, 242 

, Mid-Paleozoic time fossil 24, 281 

Oceanic deeps, Frontal 21, 200, 201 

OcEANiCA Islands, Table of rocks in 27, 332 



OCEANS — OHIO 207 

Page 

Oceans and continents, Changed positions of 27, 190 

OcHSENius, Carl, cited on origin of oil 28, 729 

O'CoNNELLy Mabjobie, Cited on Eurypterids 27, 395 

Old Red Sandstone 27, 352 

Porto Rican fossils 27. 85 

— ; Classification of aqueous habitats 26, 159 

— ; Cretaceous overlaps in northwest Europe and their bearing on the 

bathymetric distribution of the Cretaceous Silicispongiae 29, 142 

— , Discussion of the Lockport-Guelph section by 28, 173 

Siluric by 28, 130 

waterlimes by 28, 174 

— ; Distribution and occurrence of the Eurypterids, A summary. . . 24, 499-514 

— ; Orthogenetic development of the costae in the Perisphlnctinse 30, 152 

— , Reference to "Distribution and occurrence of the Eurypterids" by . 27, 395 
— , Remarks on marine faunas by 27, 160 

— and Brown, Barnum ; Discovery of the Oxfordian in western Cuba. SO, 152 
Grabau, a. W. ; Were the graptolite shales, as a rule, deep or shal- 
low water deposits 28. 205, 959 

Oeland, Ordovlcic of 27, 610 

Officers and members of the Paleontological Society 21. 83; 22. 97 ; 

23. 89 ; 24, 122 ; 26, 146 ; 26, 161 ; 27. 163 ; 28, 218 ; 29, 155 ; 30, 159 

— , Correspondents and Fellows, List of 21, 53 ; 22, 71 ; 23, 55 ; 

24, 79 ; 25, 107 ; 26, 117 ; 27, 127 ; 28, 177 ; 29, 107 ; 30. 119 

— , Election of 21, 2 r 22, 2 ; 23, 2 ; 

24.9; 25,5; 26.11; 27,11; 28,12; 29,11; 30.11 

- of Cordilleran Section, Election of 21, 790 ; 23, 70 ; 24, 92 ; 25, 125 

the Pacific Coast Section of the Paleontological Society 25, 151 ; 

26, 166 ; 27, 169 ; 28. 223 ; 29. 161 

Paleontological Society, Election of 21, 73 ; 22, 89 ; 23, 81 ; 

24, 104 ; 25, 133 ; 26, 146 ; 27, 144 ; 28. 195 ; 29. 125 ; 30, 147 
(^UEX peak, "Observatory mountain" synonymous with 21, 537 

— quartzite. Age and classification of 21, 526 

— , Utah, Geologic map of vicinity of 21, 535 

C>GDENSBURO-C ANTON Quadrangle, Paleozoic rocks of 26, 287 

Ogilvik, I. H., cited on Adirondack glaciation 28, 548 

rocks 25, 248 

anorthosite 29, 401, 416 

cirques in Adirondacks 27, 648 

moraines in the Adirondacks 27, 650-651 

Paradox quadrangle in the Adirondacks 27, 665 

— , Reference to "Glacial phenomena in the Adirondacks" of 27, 648 

O^modirun martini. Name proix)sed for new Plesiosaurian genus from 

Nebraska ; 24, 121 

Ohern, D. W. ; The stratigraphy of the lower Pennsylvanian of north- 
eastern Oklahoma 22, 63, 720 

Ohio and Chattanooga shales 27, 465 

— , Berea a non-marine formation 26, 210 

sandstone in 26. 96, 155, 205-216 



208 J. STANLEY-BROWN INDEX TO VOLUMES 21 TO 30 

Pafe 

Ohio, Chagrin shales, local anticlines in, at Cleveland 21, 24, 771 

— , Devonlc black shale of .• 25, 137 

— , Dunkard series of 27, 86 

— , Evidence of very early glaciation in 24, 71, 696 

— gas wells discussed by F. U. Van Horn 29, 69 

— Indiana oil field ; J. A. Bownocker 28, 156 

— , Natural gas at Cleveland. 26. 102 

— , Oil development in 28» 623 

fields of 28, 561-562 

— , Oil production in 28, 667, 669 

— , Olentangy shale and associated deposits of northern ; 26, 95 

of central 26, 112, 156 

— , Shorelines of the glacial lakes in the Oberlin quadrangle 21, 21, 762 

— , Uplift In 29, 201 

Oil, Analyses of mineral 28, 719 

— and gas accumulation 28, 158 

in the mid-continent field 28, 158 

— bearing and oil-producing formations, Relation of 29. 92 

rocks. Influence of wind on the accumulation of ; J. C. Branner. . . 24,^ 

— development, Influence of deep drillins; in 28, 652 

geology on 28, 625 

— field, Appalachian 28, 617 

, Geology of a portion of the MoKittrick 26. 169 

, Map of Appalachian 28, 619 

of Canada 28, 157 

Illinois 28. 156 

Ohio-Indiana 28. 156 

the Gulf coast 28, 157 

Ilealdton 28. 159 

— fields, Appalachian 28, 156 

of Alberta 28, 725 

California, Faunal relations of the Upper Neocene In the Sar- 
gent J 24, 129 

Illinois; F. H. Kay 28,655 

Kansas 28,687 

Ix)uisiana 28, 709 

Oklahoma 28, 693 

Texas 28, 702 

the mid-continent 28, 157, 685 

Pacific coast; R. W. Pack 28,157,677 

Rocky Mountains 28, 157 

, Question of salt water in Mexican 24, 270 

— from Mexican oil fields, Character of 24, 264 

— geology in relation to valuation ; R. Arnold 30, 96 

— horizons In the United States 28, 630 

— In Alaska, Evidence of 28, 678 

Appalachian field. Early history of 28, 620 

. Future of , . . . . 28, 647 



OIL — OLDHAM 209 

Page 
Oil In Appalachian field, Origin of 28, 638 

Cretaceous shales and sandstones 28. 678 

Ohio, The Clinton sand as a source of ; J. A. Bownocker 22, 67, 736 

Washington, Evidence of 28, 678 

— , Late theories of origin of 28, 727 

— localities, Other undeveloped Mexican 24, 273 

— pools in regions of monoclinal structure, Notes on the geological rela- 

tions of ; Frederick G. Clapp 22, 67, 737 

of southern Oklahoma and northern Texas ; J. N. Gardner 26, 102 

— recovery 28, 157 

— shales. Productivity of 28, 157 

, Regional alteration of ; David White 26, 101 

— , Statistics of 28, 646 

— strata, Correlation of 28, 629 

of Gulf coast of Mexico, Age of 24, 255 

— supply of the world 28, 603 

— territory, Extent of northeastern Mexico 24, 269 

— , Theories of origin of 28, 157 

— wells of Mexico, Production of Ebano and Casiano 24, 266 

' — , See also petroleum. 

Ojo Alamo beds correlated with the Judith River 26, 380 

, Fossils of the 25, 379-380 

Okek, Lobe3?z, cited on epipterygold 28, 981 

Okiahoma, Boulder beds of the Caney shale at Talihina 23, 50, 457-462 

— , Chimney Hill formation of 26, 75 

— , Fossil fishes from the Caney shale of 24, 119 

— , Healdton oil field of. 28, 159 

— , Natural bridge near McAlester 21, 327 

bridges in western 21, 333 

— , OU fields of 28, 569, 693 

pools of southern 26, 102 

— Pleistocene fauna ; E. L. Troxell 28, 212 

— , Progress geologic map of 21, 29, 777 

Okoboji, Location of lake 21, 122 

Ou) Red Sandstone, Description of 27, 362 

, Environment of fishes of 27, 399 

, Faunal changes in 27, 401 

, Fluviatile origin of 27, 39 

of Shetland Islands 27, 378 

, Origin of. 27, 345 

, Prevailing views of origin of 27, 349 

Oldest fossils ; Andrew C. Lawson 24, 97 

Oldbotd, Ida S. ; Relationships of the recent and fossil Invertebrate 

faunas on the west side of the Isthmus of Panama to those on the 

east side 29, 162 

Oldboyd, T. S. ; MoUuscan faunas from Deadmans Island 27, 173 

Oldham, D. W., quoted on use of seismograph 21, 386 

— , Time of Takutat Bay earthquake computed from selsmograms by . . 21, 386 

XIV — ^BoLL. Oeol. Soc. Am. 



210 J. STANLEY-BROWN INDEX TO VOLUMES 21 TO 30 

Page 

Ou>HAM, R. D., Acknowledgment to 21, S39 

— , Origin of Alaskan earthquakes 1899 located from seismograph by. . 21,376 

— .Reference to seismographlc studies on Alaskan earthquakes 21,375 

— ; Report on the great (Assam) earthquake of 1897, Reference to 22, 174 

Olenellus fauna of the Wasatch region, Appearance of 21, 520 

OiJiNTANOY shale and associated deposits of northern Ohio; C. R. 

Stauflfer 26, 95 

of* central Ohio and its strattgraphlc significance; A. W. Grabau. . 

26, 112. 156 

OuGocENE and Ek)cene of California, Relations of 25, 153 

the Wind River and Big Horn basins ; William J. Sinclair and 

Walter Granger 22, 63, 722 

Miocene faunas of California, Review of the ; B. L. Clark 26, 416 

— , Faunal zones of the 29, 166 

West Coast 29, 304 

— faunas and formations. Symposium of 29, 165 

— »— of the Pacific coast 29, 166 

— - floras of North America 29, 633 

-, Miocene, Pliocene, and Pleistocene, Correlation of 23, 245-250 

— of North America, Marine 29, 153 

- ( ?) of Oregon 25, 154 

the basin region and its relation to Ollgocene of Pacific Coast 

province 25, 153 

Wt^st Indian Islands 29, 623 

Washington 29, 165 

West Coast of North Americ'a 29, 297 

— l)a]eontology and stratigraphy in Washington 29, 166 

— , Plant fossils of 29, 147 

— sea of West Coast 29, 301 

--, Skeletons of leptomeryx from White River 25, 145 

■ 

OMPHANT, F. H., Cited on oil 28, 632 

in igneous rocks , 28, 593 

Olivine diabase (Auvergnose) in Vii*ginia, Megascopic and microscopic 

character and chemical comiwsitlon and classiflcation of . . . 24,327.328 

Olm STEAD, D., made State Geologist of North Carolina 25, 160 

Omaha, Nebraska, and Council Bluffs, Iowa, Pleistocene of the vicinity 

of 22, 65. 730 

Om alius d'Halloy, J. J., Introduction of term Cretaceous by 25. 336 

Omort, F., Origin of Alaskan earthquakes 1890 located from seismograph 

by 21,376 

-, Reference to seismographlc studies on Alaskan earthqimkes 21, 375 

On the former existence of local glaciers in the White Mountains ; Ixiuls 

Agasslz 27, 2&4 

Onandaoa coral fauna 27, 478 

Oncoceras futile beds, Antlcosti Island ; 21, 714 

Ontario and New York, The Cataract : a new formation at the base of 

the Silurlc, In 24, 107 

Quebec, Correlation of the Middle Ordovlclan formations of 24, HI 



x 



ONTARIO OPPORTUNITIES 211 

Page 
Ontario and Quebec, Richmond formations of 24, 110 

— basin, Altitudes and warping in 27, 243 

, Table showing Pleistocene deformation of 27, 244 

— Bureau of Mines, Classification and nomenclature of pre-Gambrian 

rocks adopted by 26, 87 

— , Canada, Deformation of unconsolidated beds in 28, 323 

, Revision of pre-Cambrian classification in 26, 87 

, Siluric sections in 25, 308-320 

— , Contact of Cataract formation in 25, 287 

— division, Clarke and Schuchert, Use of term 21, 680 

, Medina, Clinton, and Niagara group termed 21, 680 

— , Glacial deposits in 25, 71 

— , Guelph formation of 27, 148 

— , Medina and Cataract formations of 25, 277 

— , Moraines of 23, 83, 371-375 

— , New Cystid from the Clinton formation of 21, 76 

— , Oriskany sandstones of 23, 83, 371-375 

— , Petroleum in 28. 722 

— , Photograph of Anderdon at Amherstburg 27, 72, 76 

pre-Onondaga Jointing at Amherstburg 27, 74 

— , Pillow lava of 26, 611 

— region. Postglacial deformation of the 25, 65 

Ontabio-Saint Lawrence Valley, Great Lakes outlet 24, 232 

Ontario, Silurian system of 25, 40 

— , Temiskamite from 25, 76 

Ontogeny and paleontology; F. B. Loomis and Amadeus W. Grabau... 21,74 

Onyx deposits in east Tennessee ; C H. Gordon 23, 37, 729 

Oolite (great) formation (Jurassic) of England, Origin of 21,647 

OoiJTES and oolitic structures. Micro-sections of 25, 778-780 

texture, Bibliography of 25, 774-777 

, Origin of 25, 58 

— in shale and their origin ; W. A. Tarr 29, 587 

— , North American Paleozoic 29, 102 

— of Pennsylvania 25, 760 

, Analyses of 25, 767 

the Chimney Hill formation, Oklahoma ; C. A. Reeds 25, 75 

— , Origin of 25, 745 

Monroe 21, 645 

— , Siliceous 29, 103 

— , Theory of production of 26. 58 

Oolitic and pisolitic barite from the Saratoga oil field of Texas ; E. S. 

Moore 25, 77 

— iron ore 25, 768 

— sand. Great Salt Lake, Utah 21, 645 

— structures discussed by members 29, 103 

, Inorganic production of 29, 103 

— textures in rock. Origin of 25, 745 

Oppobtunities for geological work in the far Arctic ; W. E. Ekblaw 29, 85 



212 J. STANLEY-BROWN INDEX TO VOLUMES 21 TO 30 

Optical industry, War-time development of 30, 103 

Orange group of Alaska 26, 201 

Orbigny, a. d*, cited on classification of last stage of the Jurassic sj'stem 

26,298 

demarcation betu'een Cretaceous and Eocene 25, 321 

Okbitosphknoids and alispbenoids, Mammal and reptile 24, 242 

Orcadian formations, Stratigraphy of Middle Old Red 27, 370^78 

OiuK>viciAN and Cambrian faunas of Newfoundland 26, 138 

Silurian polar faimas ; R. S. Bassler 22, 92 

Siluric systems, Contacts between 26, 286 

— ;\t Glenogle, British Columbia, Ijower 24, 52 

— - brachiopodn .•. 26, 421 

, Comparison of lithologic, stratigrapbic, and geographic range of. 26,428 

, List of 26, 424-427 

— conglomerates of the Galeua-Trenton series 26, 265 

— dolomite, Coralline algsp in 24, 115, 607 

— - fauna from soutbeastern Alaska ; Edwin Kirk 29, 143 

— floras 30, 507 

— Iron ores of Wabaua, Newfoundland, Fossil algw of the 26, 148 

— - limestone 28, 166 

of Pennsylvania discussed by A. W. Orabau 28, 167 

— limestones in Wisconsin, Flaorite in 29, 104 

— paleogeograi>by , New Points in 29, 88 

— - rocks of IIudHon Bay region 30, 342 

— Silurian boundary, Inconsistencien in drawing the 27, 463 

— strata l)eneatb the Healdton ell field, Oklahoma : S; Powers 28. 159 

Ordovicic of the Atlantic region 27, 573 

— Siluric section of the Mingan and Anticosti islands ; Charles Schuchert 

and W. H. Twenhofel 21, 75, 677-716 

, Gulf of Saint I^iwrence ; W. H. Twenhofel and 

C. Schuchert 27, 312 

— si^ecies, Table of 27, 566 

— system, Anticosti island 21, 693 

Ore alterations. Relation of physiographic changes to; W. W. Atwood. 26,106 

— deposit at Barth, Nevada, Iron- 24, 96 

— - deposits, R6Ie of colloidal migration in 26, 394 

— enrichment, Some chemical factors affecting secondary sulphide 26,393 

— , Oriskany iron 27, 64 

Oregon Bureau of Mines and Geology ; I. A. Williams 26, 137 

— Cascades, Geologic features of 29, 81 

— , Contribution to the geology of eastern 21, 791 

— , Corals from Cretaceous and Tertiarj' of 27, 174 

— , Fauna of the Siphonalia Sutterensls z(»ne in the Roneburg quadrangle 

26,169 

— , Marine Oligocene of 29, 297, 303 

— , Oil field of 28, 593 

— , Oligocene (?) of 26, IW 

— , Review of the fauna of the Rattlesnake Pliocene of eastern 26, 169 



ORKOON — OROGENIC 213 

Page 

Oregon, StitMop fonimtioii of 28» 170 

--, War work of University of 30, 83 

Obks at the Veta Kica mine, Mexico, Occurrence of silver, coi)i)er, and 

lead ; Frank R. Van Horn , 22, 67, 738 

Oboanic deposits of the sea 28, 933 

— origin of some mineral dei)osits in unaltered Paleozoic sediments; 

G. Van Ingen 26, 85 

— - sand type, Description of 21, 643-647 

Organisms, Anatomy and physoiogj' in extinct 21, 74 

Organization of the Vertebrate Paleontologists 28, 216 

"Origin of beach cusps" ; J. C. Branner, Reference to 21, 601 

Bighorn dolomite of Wyoming, Summary 24, 624 

certain Upper Cambrian and Lower Ordoviclan sediments of Center 

County, Pennsylvania, Notes on the ; Thomas C. Brown 24, 112 

coal. Inadequacy of the sapropelic hyiwthesis of the 24, 73, 706 

dolomite; F. M. Van Tuyl 25,66; 26,62 

as disclosed by stains and .other methoils ; I']. Steidtmann. 28, 1»3. 431 

foliation in the Precambrian rocks of northern New York ; William 

J. Miller 27, i»7 

granites as well as metacrystals by selective solution — a re<*anta- 

tion ; Alfred C. Lane 24, 73, 704 

gypsum deposits. Hypothesis for 26» 223 

Monks Mound ; A. R. Crook 26, 74 

oil. Late theories of 28, 727 

, Theories of 28, 157 

oolites and the oolitic texture in rocks ; T. C. Brown 26, 58, 745 

pillow lavas ; J. V. Lewis 26, 32, 591 

the alkaline rocks ; Reginald A. Daly 21, 87-118 

basins within the hamada of the Libyan desert; W. H. Hobbs. 26, 396 

Bighorn dolomite of Wyoming ; Eliot Blackwelder 24, 607-624 

earth's plan, Bearing of the Tertiary mountain belt on. . , . 21, 179-226 

Great Basin ranges, Views of geologists on 21, 545 

hard rock phosphates of Florida ; E. H. Sellards 24, 75, 716 

iron ores of Kiruna, Sweden ; R. A. Daly 26, 99 

Liassic flora of the Mixteca Alta ; G. R. Wieland 24, 115 

Rocky Mountain phosphate deposits ; Eliot Blackwelder 26> 100 

sternum in the reptiles and mammals ; S. W. Williston 27, 152 

thick salt and gypsum deposits ; E. B. Branson 26, 103, 231-242 

tufas of Lake Lahontan ; J. C. Jones 26, 392 

veinlets in the limestone, shale, and gj'psum beds of central New 

York ; Stephen Taber 28, 131 

OiUNDAN and Siestan formations, Fauna of 26, 156 

Obiskany iron ore ; R. J. Holden 27, 64 

— sandstones of Ontario ; Clinton R. StaufTer 23, 83, 371-375 

Okiyitholestes, Restudy of 28, 215 

Obnithoiiimub, Additional characters of 27, 150 

Obnithofoda, Igu&nodontia ; R. S. Lull 28, 210 

Oboqknic Tertiary-Quaternary history of Sierra Nevada 27, 46 



214 J.STANLEY-BROWN INDEX TO VOLUMES 21 TO 30 

Pace 

Orographic oripin of ancient Lake Bonneville ; C. R. Keyes 28» 164, 351 

Orthis sp., Fossil of the quartzlte at Geneva 21, 527 

Obthoceras limestone 27, 585 

Obthochoanites and Holochoanites, Relation of the Protochoanites to 30, 148 
Ortiioclase as a vein mineral ; Austin F. Rogers 23, 72 

— fragment bent at 1,200 degrees under load 21, 147 

— , Melting curves of, Figure showing 21, 160 

Orthogenesis, A study in 27, 148 

Orthooenetic development of the costae In the Perisphinctinie ; M. 

0*ConneU 30, 152 

— series, Mutations among invertebrates in 27, 148 

Ortmann, a. E., cited on Argentine marine fauna 29, 643 

Obton, Edward, cited on Ohio and Indiana oil rocks 28, 670 

petroleum 28, 556 

Trenton limestone 28, 672 

— and Sherzer, William H., cited on description of Sylvania sandstone 

21,660 

Orton, Edward, Jr., elected Fellow 21, 4 

OsBORN, H. F. ; Addition and evolution of "characters" in paleontologic 

phyla 26, 151 

— ; Additional characters of Tyrannosaurus and Omithomimus 27, 150 

— , African mammals discussed by 23, 85 

— ; Anderson's method of photography in vertebrate paleontology 21, 75 

— ; Characters and restoration of Cope's sauropoda 30, 151 

— cited on fossils from Morrison formation 29, 259 

Lance fauna 25, 391 

— ; Close of Jurassic and opening of Cretaceous time in North America . 

26. 295-302 

the Cretaceous and opening of Eocene time in North America. 25,321 

— ; Comparison of the late Pleistocene fauna of Europe and North 

America 24, 120 

— ; Correlation and paleogeography 23, 85, 232 

of the Pleistocene of Europe and America 21, 75 

— , Discussion of Adapidie and other lemuroidea and phylogeny of the 

higher primates by 26, 153 

fossil mammals by 28, 210 

vertebrate localities 01' Florida by 26, 154 

paleontologic criteria in time relations by 26, 411 

Pleistocene cave deposits by 25, 142 

Sauropod dinosaurs by 26, 153 

symposium papers by 25, 130 

the nflinities of the Multituberculata by 26, 152 

lemuroidea 25, 141 

on the armor of Stegosaurus 21, 76 

symposium "Correlation of the Cretaceous" by 26, 415 

Varanosaurus species, a Permian Pelycosaur 21, 74 

— ; Final results in the phylogeny of the titanotheres 25, 139 

— , Formation of Nomenclature Committee by *: 28, 973 



OSBORN OSBORN 215 

Page 
OsBOBN, H. F. ; Geologic tour of western Nebraska 28. 197 

— , Introduction to syniposluui on the passage from the Jurassic to the 

Cretaceous by 26. ir»l 

— ; I>ong-jawed mastodon skeleton from South Dakota and phylopeny of 

the proboscidea 29, 133 

- : Memorial of S. W. Williston 30, 66 

- : >figration and succession of human tyi>es of the Old Stone Age of 

Europe 26, 140 

; **Mutations*' of Waagen and "Mutations'* of De Vrles, or re<»tigrada- 

tions of Osbom compared (read by title) 22, 96 

- ; Mutations of Waagen and of De Vries 24, 120 

, mutations richtung of Neumayr, nuitants of De Vries : Rela- 
tions of these phenomena in evolution 27, 148 

- - : New method of restoring eotitanops and brontotherium 25, 140. 40<» 

: Observations on the skeletons of Moropus cooki in the American 

Museum 29. 131 

-: Ostrich dinosaur Struthiomimus and a restudy of Ornitholestes. . . 28,215 

— ; Paleontologic evidences of adaptive radiation 21, 74 

— , Paleontological Society calltHi to order by President 26, 144 

— , Paper of B. Brown presented by 25, 355 

E. Douglass read by 25, 417 

- - ; Pelvis and sacrum of Camarasaurus 27, 151 

— , Perlssodactyle discussed by 23, 85 

— ; Recent' results in the phylogeny of the titanotheras 25, 403 

work on the dinosaurs of the Cretaceous 26, 416 

— ; Rectlgradations and allometrons in relation to the conceptions of the 

"mutations of Waagen" of species, genera, and phyla 25, 142, 411 

— , Reference to symposium paper of 25, 130 

— , Remarks on monodactylous hcrse by 27, 152 

Pan vetus, a chimpanzee of Pleistocene age, by 27, 150 

policy of Vertebrate Section by 27, 153 

sauropods by 27, 151 

— , Resolution that a vote of thanks be tendered by the members of the 
California Meeting of the Paleontological Society by its Secretary 
to the American Association for the Advancement of Science, to 
the President of the University of California, and to the President 
of Stanford University In appreciation of courtesies extended to 

the Society, offered by 26, 417 

— ; Restoration of the world series of elephants and mastodons 25, 142, 407-410 

— , Section of vertebrate paleontology called to order by President 26, 151 

— , Session August 6, 1915, Calif crnia Meeting of the Paleontological So- 
ciety called to order by 26, 415 

— ; Significance of indices and ratios in the phylogenetic and systematic 

study of mammals 24, 120 

— ; Skeleton and restoration of Camarasaurus 28, 215 

— ; Skull of Tj'rannosaurus 21, 75 

— , Speaker at annual dinner 26, 104 



216 J. STANLEY-BROWN INDEX TO VOLUMES 21 TO 30 

Fi«l 

OsBOBN, H. F., and MooK, C. C. ; Caniarasaunis and Amphicoelias, and 

other sauropods of Cope ' 30> 379 

from CaQon City 80,151 

08B0RN*s "Age of Mammals/' Literature referring to Artiodactyla. 23,168-178 
Oscillations of Alaskan glaciers ; R. S. Tarr and Lawrence Martin 21* 20, 758 

OsdbooD, , Reference to studies by 25, 413 

Osteology and relationships of Paraniys and the affinities of the Iscby- 

romyid^e ; W. D. Matthew 21, 74 

OsTRAcoDA as guide fossils in the Silurian deposits of the Appalachian 

region; E. O. Ulrich ,.. 28,202 

— , Stratigraphic significance of ; R. S. Bassler 22, 94, 275 

OsTBicH dinosaur Strutbioniimus and a restudy of Ornitholestus ; H. F. 

Osborn 28, 215 

OsTWALD, W. ; Studien (iber die Bildung und Umwandlung fester KOrper, 

Reference to 21, 164 

Otsquago sandstone 29, 343 

Ottawa Valley, Chazy formation in 22, 62, 719 

OuBAY and Needle Mountain folios of the United States Geological Sur- 
vey, Reference to rock streams of San Juan Mountains by 21, 664 

Outlet control, Reference by H. L. Falrchlld to 27, 245 

Outline map of State of New York 27, 235 

— of progress in paleontological research on the Pacific coast, Presi- 

dential address by J. C. Merriam 29, 129 

OuTUNES of the geology of Brazil to accompany the geologic map of 

Brazil ; J. C. Branner 30, 189 

OvEBTHRUSTS near Ogden, Utah, Map showing 21, 534 

— of Willard and Ogden canyons. Geologic maps showing 21, 537, 538 

Owen, D. D., cited on Saint Peter (Ordovician) sandstone 21, 654 

— , Geological work of 25, 166 

Owen, Sir Richard, cited on BothriosponfJyluH from the Kimmeridgian 

of England 26, 331 

Owen Sound section, Ontario 25, 319 

Ox-bows in the Connecticut Valley, Glacial 25. 232 

OxFORDiAN in western Cuba 30, 152 

Oxidation, Post-Glacial 28, 289 

Oxides of iron and ferrous irou, Magnetic properties of 27, 60 

Oysters of the Miocene of the Muir syncline i 25, 154 

OzARKiAN and Canadian systems, New data on the relations of the ; E. O. 

Ulrich 24,51 

— fauna ; E. O. Ulrich 23, 84 

— sandstones near Madison, Wisconsin 27, 460 

— Stromatoi)oroids from Pennsylvania, Exhibition of 24, 115 

OZARKS, Quaternary deformation of 26, 67 

P 

Pacific Association of Scientific Societies, CordlUeran Section met in 

conjunction with 26, 130 

— coast and basin regions, Correlation of Tertiary formations of 25,156 



PACIFIC ^PAIGE 217 

PAge 

Pacific coast, Geologic range and evolution of echinoids 29* 164 

, Hipparton-like horses of 27, 171 

Macridae, Erolution of the 26, 170 

oil field; R. W. Pack 28,157 

fields of the 28, 677 

, Pliocene of 27, 172 

, Progress of paleontologic research on the 29, 129 

province, Oligocene of » 26, 153 

region, Paleontologic research in the 28, 223 

, Relief of our ; J. S. Dlller 26, 111 

Section of Paleontological Society, Election of officers of 27, 169 

, General business of 27, 168 

,Minutes of the 24,126; 26,150; 26,166; 

27, 168 ; 28, 223 ; 29, 160 

, Reference to 26, 123 

, Stratigraphic and faunal relations of the later Eocene of the 26, 168 

, Symposium of Oligocene faunas of 29, 165 

— Eocene, Correlation of 29, 148 

— islands. Petrography of 27, 48, 325 

, Rock species from 27, 343 

, Table of volcanic 27, 333 

— ranges of California, Structure of 30, 84 

Pack, R. W., cited on Monterey deposits 29, 299 

term monocline 28, 569 

Turritella andersoni beds 29,293 

— ; Oil fields of the Pacific coast 28, 677 

— ; Pacific Coast oil field 28, 157 

— , Reference to Cretaceous fossils collected by 26, 606 

— , Vertebrate remains from marine Tertiary beds in the Tejon hills col- 
lected by 24, 128 

Packabd, a. S., cited on highest beach on Labrador 29, 227 

Packabo, E. L. ; Correlation between invertebrate faunas of California 

and those of Mexico 26, 414 

— ; Cretaceous faunas of the Santa Ana Mountains 26, 169 

— ; Evolution of the Pacific Coast macridie 26, 170 

— ; Faunal studies in the Cretaceous of the Santa Ana Mountains of 

southern California 27, 174 

— , Secretary of Pacific Coast Section of Paleontological Society 27, 168 

— , Some west coast mactridffi 26. 151 

Page, D., cited on monoclines 27, 90 

Page, W. T., cited on allanite 28, 477 

Pahoehoe lava, Chronological table of 26, 629 

, Formation of ., 26, 639 

Paige, Sidney, cited on Llano series of Texas 28, 862 

— , Di^ussion of magmatic differentiation by 26, 46 

papers bearing on ore deposition by 26, 403 

the term "bajada" by 26,391 

— , Fossiliferous conglomerates discussed by 23, 83 



218 J. STANLEY-BROWN INDEX TO VOLUMES 21 TO 30 

Paige, Sidney ; Mechanics of Intrusion of tlie Black Hills Precambrian 

granite 27, 104 

— ; Precambf ian structure of the Black Hills, South Dakota 27, 106 

northern Black Hills as bearing on the Homestake ore body 

24, 293-300, 704 
— ; United States Geological Surrey as n civic institution during the war 30, 78 

Palache, Charles, cited on allanlte 28, 467 

Diamond Hill quartz deposits 26, 472 

— ; Fayalite in the granite of Rockport, Massachusetts 21, 33, 787 

— and Wabren, C. H. ; Pegmatite in granite of Quincy, Massachusetts. . 

21. 33, 784 
PAi.i>E0Ni8CiD fishes from Boyle County, Kentucky, Si^eciniens collected 

by C. R. Eastman and Moritz Fischer of 24, 119 

Paleobotanic evidence of the age of the Morrison formation ; E. W. 

Berry 26, 90, 151, 335 

Paij:obotanical study of the coal-bearing rocks of the Raton Mesa region 

of Colorado and N*ew Mexico ; F. H. Knowlton 24, 114 

Paleobotany, Titles of papers on ." 28, 88 

Palbocene fauna, Tj'pical 25, 382 

— faunas 25, 382-385 

— formations in Europe, Reference to V 25, 322 

— , Use of the term 25, 381 

— vertebrate fauna as evidence on the Cretaceous-Tertiary problem . . . 25, 381 

Paleo-ecolooy, The question of 29, 154 

— , Scope and significance of 29, 369 

Paleooeographic maps of North America 25, 136 

— method in stratigraphy 27, 500 

— significance of the Cenozoic floras of equatorial America and the adja- 

cent regions ; E. W. Berry 29, 129, 631 

Paleooeography, Bearing of the Paleozoic Bryozoa on 22, 93, 252 

— , Biologic principles of 21, 73 

— , Chronology in geology based on 27, 491 

— , Correlation and chronology on the basis of ; Charles Schuchert 26, 411 

— , "Giant ripples" or indicators of 28, 161 

— , New points in Ordovician and Silurian 29, 88 

— , 1900-1912, Partial bibliography of : 23,254 

— of Medina, Cataract, and Brassfield seas 25, 295 

Missouri ; B. B. Branson 29, 71 

the Ollgocene of Washington ; C. E. Weaver 29, 165 

western North America during the Mesozoic 27, 505 

Paleolithic man. Restoration of ; R. S. Lull 21, 75 

Pajleontolooic and stratigraphic geology, Papers on 2I, 30, 31 

— correlation between continental Miocene deposits of the Mohave re- 

gion and marine Tertiary beds of San Joaquin Valley, California ; 
John C. Merriam and Robert W. Pack 24, 128 

— criteria used in determining time relations. General consideration of 26,410 

— evidences of adaptive radiation ; H. Fairfield Osborn 2I, 74 

climate ; T. W. Stanton and David White 21, 73 



PALBONTOLOGIC PALEONTOLOGY 219 

Page 
Paleontolooic evidences of recapitulation ; E. R. Cumings and L. Hus- 

sakof 21, 74 

— method in stratigraphy : 27, 499 

— phyla, The addition and evolution of "character*' in ; H. F. Osborn. . 26, 151 

— record, Adequacy of the ; R. S. Bassler 21, 73 

— standpoint. Continuity of development from the ; T. Wayland Vaughan 21, 74 
I^ALEONTOLOoiCAL uotes : 1. Polyphyletic genera. 2. An illustration of 

Waagen's theory of mutations ; A. W. 6rab.au 24, 109 

— Section, Reference to 21, 34 

— Society, Address of President, and smoker tendered to Geological So- 

ciety of America by the Geological Society of Washington attended 

by 23. 86 

, Auditing C!ommlttee of 23, 81 ; 24, 103 ; 25, 133 ; 

26, 146 ; 27, 144 ; 28, 195 ; 29, 125 ; 30, 146 

1 Constitution and by-laws of 21, 77-82 

, Dinner with the Fellows of the Geological Society of America . . . 23, 84 

, Members proposed for election to fellowship in the Geological So- 
ciety of America by the 22, 88 

, Memorial address on Samuel Calvin by Stuart Weller, before. . . . 23, 82 

, Names of organizers of 21, 69 

, Officers, election of 21, 73 ; 22, 89 ; 23. 81 ; 

24, 104 ; 25, 133 ; 26, 146 ; 27, 144 ; 28, 195 ; 29, 125 ; 30, 147 

members and correspondents of 21, 83 ; 22, 96 ; 23, 89 ; 

24, 122 ; 25, 146 ; 26, 161 ; 27, 163 ; 28, 218 ; 29, 155 ; 30, 159 

, Pacific Coast Section, Election of officers of 27, 169 

, General business of 27, 168 

, Minutes of the 24, 126; 25, 150; 26, 166; 

27, 168 ; 28, 223 ; 29, 160 

, Reference to 25, 123 

, J. P. Smith, President, Report of meeting of 24, 102 

, Persons not Fellows eligible to 21, 16 

, Plan of publication of papers of 22, 86 

, Preliminary meeting of 21, 69-72 

, Proceedings of 21, 72 ; 22, 85 ; 23, 77 ; 

24, 99 ; 25, 127 ; 26, 141 ; 27, 139 ; 28, 189 ; 29, 119 ; 30, 143 

.Register of 21, 40 ; 22, 96 ; 23, 88 ; 

24, 121 ; 25, 145 ; 26, 160 ; 27, 162 ; 28, 234 ; 29, 166 

, Report of committee on formation of 21, 16 

publication fund 24, 102 

organization committee of 21, 71, 72 

Council 23,77; 24,101; 25,130; 

26, 144 ; 27, 142 ; 28, 192 ; 29, 123 ; 30. 144 

Secretary ; 21,72; 22,85; 23,78; 

24, 101 ; 25, 131 ; 26, 144 ; 27, 142 ; 28, 193 ; 29, 123 ; 30, 144 

Treasurer 22,89^23.80; 24,103; 

25, 132 ; 26, 145 ; 27, 143 ; 28, 194 ; 29, 124 ; 30, 145 

, Titles of papers on general paleontology and stratigraphy 23, 82 

Paleontologists, Organization of Vertebrate 28, 216 

Paijex)ntoloqy and embryology 21, 74 



220 J. STANLBY-BROfWN INDEX TO VOLUMES 21 TO 30 

Paleontology and ontogeny 21» 74 

phylogeny 21, 74 

stratigraphy of southwestern Washington, Tertiary 24, 131 

the Porter division of the Oligooene in Washington ; K. E. Van 

Winckle 29, 166 

— , Contributions from, to morphology 21, 74 

— , Economic value of : 30, 153 

— . Evolution and Huxley's prophecy on 21r 296 

— , Interdependence of stratigraphy and 21, 73 

— . Isolation In 21, 74 

— of a voracious appetite ; John M. Clarke 23, 83 

arrested evolution discussed by Charles Schuchert 28, 205 

man, Discussion on chapter of 26, 147 

; S. W. WUliston 21, T4 

North America, Fauna of Anticosti new to 21, 678 

— , Philosophical aspects of SO, 150 

— , Photography in vertebrate 21, 75 

Paleozoic Arachnida — scorpions and spiders ; Alexander Petrunkevitch 24, 106 

— arthropods^ Relations to the strandline of ! . . 22, 94, 279 

— brachiopods, Rhynchonelliform shells most common type of 21, 498 

— Bryozoa, Reference to 23, 357, 366 

, The relations to paleogeography of 22, 93, 252 

— cephalopods, Restoration of 25, 136 

— coals,. Resins in 23, 37, 728 

— continental seas. Extent of 22, 304 

, Oscillatory character of 22, 320 

— corals. Evolution of the anthozoa and the systematic position of . . . . 26, 157 

— delta deposit of Devonic black shale 25, 137 

deposits of North America ; Amadeus W. Grabau 24, 400-528 

. , Folding of the strata and subsequent erosion..'.. 24,442-468 

, Interpretation of the sections 24, 492 

— deposits and fossils on the Piedmont of Maryland and Virginia ; R. S. 

Bassler 29, 127 

— faunas, Development of 29, 143 

in southwestern Missouri 25, 135 

of the Eastport quadrangle, Maine, Correlation of the 23, 83,349-352 

, On the derivation of 22, 96 

— fishes ; Bashford Dean 23, 86, 224 

— floras of North and South America 29, 129 

— formations of Europe and America, Early 27, 159 

— glaciation in southeastern Alaska ; Edwin Kirk 29, 149 

— history of Central America and the West Indies ; R. S. Bassler 29, 129 

— limestone, Formation of 27, 147 

— Lycopods, Note on a process of f ossilization in the 24, 115 

— nomenclature of stratigraphic units. Suggestions concerning 22, 384 

— of Brazil 3o! 204 

North America, Oil-bearing and oil-producing formations in 29,92 

— oolites, North American 29 102. 



PALEOZOIC PANTOTHERIA 221 

Page 
Paleozoic physiography of the southern Adirondacks 24, 72, 701 

— reptiles and Amphibia, a coAiparlson of old and new world forms; 

E. C. Case ; 23. 86, 200 

— rocks discussed by G. H. Chadwick. . . ! 28, 171 

E. Haworth 28, 171 

M. Y. Williams 28, 171 

of Hudson and James bays 28, 171 ; 30, 339 

of New York, Proposed modifications In the nomenclature of the 

early ; H. P. Gushing 22, 62 

on the Piedmont plateau discussed by Grabau and Merriam 29, 127 

— section and fossils along Nelson River 30, 346 

of Alaska-Yukon boundary 26, 13 

— sediments of middle western Virginia, Authorities cited on occurrence 

of Igneous rocks as dikes in the 24, 302 

, Organic origin of some mineral deposits in unaltered 26, 85 

, Upper Cambrian and Lower Ordovidan 24, 112 

— stratigraphic column, Development of the American 22, 375 

— stratigraphy of the region about Three Forks, Montana ; W. P. Haynes 

26, 157 

— system of North America, Revision of ; Edward O. Ulrich 21, 31 ; 

22, 63, 281-680 

— systems, Criteria and principles of stratigraphic classiflcatiou in re- 

vision of the 22, 394 

, Diastrophic crfterla of the 22, 394 

—. Index to Ulrich's Revision of the 24, 625 

, Present instability in stratigraphic classification of 22, 289 

, Principles of stratigraphic correlations of the 22, 505-574 

, Revision of the 22,289-680 

, Stratigraphic taxonomy of the 22, 574-680 

, Structural, gradational, and lithologic criteria of the 22, 448-479 

— time, Estimated length of 22, 295 

, "Shifting of faunas" of 22, 295 

I*ALE8TiNE, Reference to climate of 25> 536 

Palqbave, W. G., Reference to work of 28, 738 

I'ALMER, Chase, Genesis of glauconite 26, 91 

— ; New classification of natural water 24, 73 

I'Ai^TERKAMp, B., cltcd ou Stromboll 28« 263 

T*AMPEAN and Pleistocene fauna of South America and Holarctica, equiva- 
lent 24, 291 

— fauna : Equldte and Ground Sloths 24, 291 

Panama, Areal mapping and paleontologi^ investigation in coastal plain 

of 28, 205 

— Canal Zone, Geologic section of ; Donald F. MacDonald 24, 74, 707-711 

r- — , Contents of paper on 24, 707 

, Geological formations and igneous rocks of 24, 707-711 

— earthquakes and their causes 25, 34 

, — , Invertebrate faunas of ', 29, 162 

Pantothebia ; William K. Gregory 23, 191 



222 J. STANLEY-BROWN INDEX TO VOLUMES. 21 TO 30 

Para, Geology of SO. 281 

Paraoenests of minerals ; Austin F. Rogers 21, 792 

the zeolites ; J. Volney I^wis 23, 37 

Pabahyba, Geology of '. 30, 286 

Parallelism in development of the Tetraseptata 27, 148 

Paramyb and the affinities of the Ischyrorayid£e, Osteology and relation- 
ship of 21, 74 

PabanA, Geology of 30, 288 

Pabastbophia reversa beds, Anticosti island 21, 701 

Pardee, J. T., cited on Morrison formation 29, 246 

Parisian basin, Cretaceous and Tertiary systems of the 25, 336 

, Reference to 26, 341, 342 

Park City district, near Salt Lake City, Reference to work of J. M. Bout- 
well in 21, 518, 534 

minerals 25, 47 

Parker, W. K., cited on "eplotic" 28, ©83 

"epipterygoid" 28,981 

Parker Snow Bay, Geology of 29, 98 

Parks, E. M., cited on geology of Indian reservations •. . . 25, 350 

Parks, W. A., The Cataract discussed by 24, 107 

— cited on Cataract fauna 25, 281 

section, Ontario.^ 25, 317 

Clinton formation 25, 279 

Devonian 30, 372. 377 

Grimsby section, Ontario 25, 310 

— , Hamilton section, Ontario 25, 313 

— ; New cystid from the Clinton formation of Ontario 21, 76 

— ; New Trenton crinoid from Ontario 23, 84 

— , Oriskany sandstones of Ontario discussed by 23, 83 

Parmeijie, C. W., Discussion of ph3'sical<'hemical system by 25, 92 

Parsons, F. G., cited on anatomy of horse and tiipir 25, 406 

Pasooe, E. H., cited on oil fields 28, 563 

I*askapoo fauna, Character of the 25, 388 

— formation, Fossils of the 25, 371-373 

Passarge, Siegfried, cited on desert-leveling 21, 567 

by wind 21 , 581 

South African desert plains 21, 572, 583 

the South African Inselberglandsohaft 21, 592 

— ; Die Kalihari, Reference to 22, 162 

— , Reference to work in sedimentaries by 28, 737 

Patagonia, Preliminary discussion of the stratigraphy and age of the 

Pyrotherlum beds of 24, 52, 107 

Patton, H. B., Chairman of Session December 31. 1914 ae, 105 

Third Section 26, 99 

, by invitation of Vice-President White, Taken by 24,73 

— , Chairman Petrologic, Mineralogic, and Economic Section 22, 67 

— , Discovery of rock streams on Veta Peak, Colorado 21, 664 

— , First Section called to order by Vice-President 26, 61 



PATTON — ^pblb's 223 

Page 

Patton, H. B. ; Occurrence of flow-breccias in Ck)]orado 26, 3^ 

— , Physiographic features of bolsons discussed by 26, 393 

— ; Primary chalcoclte in the fluospar veins of Jefferson County, Colo- 
rado 26, 84 

— ; Recent remarkable gold "strike" at the Cresson mine, Cripple Creek, 

Colorado 26, 84 

— . Remarks on recent eruptions of Lassen Peak, California, by 26^ 105 

the Coal Creek batholith by 26,399 

— ; Rock streams of Veta Peak, Colorado 21, 26, 663-676, 764 

— , Hyrum Schneider introduced by 26, 398 

— , Secretary Third Section 24, 53 

Paulcke, Wilhelm, cited on experimental geology 29, 177 

Pavo califomicuSf Pleistocene species 27, 171 

Pawtucket formation of Narragansett series 25, 447 

Peach, B. N., cited on continental deposits 28, 742 

graptolite localities 28, 961 

pillow lava 26, 606 

white and yellow sandstones 27, 380 

— and HoBNE, J., cited on marine fauna 27, 365 

petrography of Sailmhor rocks 27, 564 

; "Geological structure of the northwest highlands of Scotland" 

of 27, 562 

; Reference to "The Silurian rocks of Britain" by 27, 365 

Peale, a. C, cited on the Judith River fonnation 25, 393 

Laramie 25,338 

relation of Upper and Lower Laramie 25, 328 

Pearce, J. N. cited on chemical analyses of Kansan drift 27, 117 

Peat at Evanston, Illinois 29, 237 

— deposit of geological interest near New Haven, Connecticut; C. A. 

Davis 24, 72, 700 

Peattie, Roderick ; Saving the silts of the Mississippi River 28, 149 

Pebbles: Types formed by the sea, rivers, wind, and glaciers; F. P. 

Gulliver 21, 31 

Peccaries of the Pleistocene of New York; J. M. Clarke and W. D. 

Matthew 26, 150 

Peck, C. Geological work in Louisiana of 25, 172 

Peck, F. B., cited on Pennsylvania talc and serpentine 29, 379 

— ; Occurrence and origin of white clays at Saylorburg, Monroe County, 

Pennsylvania 30, 96 

1*E0M ATiTE dikes of New York 30, 93 

— in the granite of Quincy, Massachusetts ; petrography (read by), C. H. 

Warren ; mineralogical (ex tempore) , C. Palache 21, 33, 784 

— of Alabama 29, 104 

— , silexite and aplite dike of northern New York ; W. J. Miller 30, 93 

Pegmatites, Gem-bearing of the world ; George F. Kunz 22, 67 

Pelagic organisms. Establishment of data through ^ 27, 476 

"Pele*6 Tears" and their bearing on the origin of australites; E. S. 

Moore 27, 51 



224 J. STANLEY-BROWN INDEX TO VOLUMES 21 TO 30 

FBg» 

Pelecypod borers along Pacific coast 24. 190 

Pelvis and sacrum of Camarasaunis ; Henry Fairfield Osbom 27f 151 

PELYCO8A.UB, Varanosaurus species, a Permian 21> 74 

Penck, a., cited on climatic changes 25« 40 

migration of desert belts 27, 180 

wind scour in dry regions 21, 581 

— , Reference to work in sedimentaries by 28, 737 

Peneplain dating discussed by members 29, 90 

— remnants in southern AJberta, Absence of 24, 532 

Peneplains, Dating of. 29. 89 

— in Kansas 28, 100 

— of the Appalachian province. 29, 575 

Peneplanation of the plateau, British East Africa 23, 307 

Penfield, S. L., cited on allanite 28, 467 

Penh ALLOW, D. P., cited on occurrence of interglacial beds in Canada. 21, 435 
— f Memoir of ; Alfred B. Barlow 22, 15 

— and Jackson, Robebt T. ; Phylogeny and paleontology 21, 74 

Pennsylvania, Analyses of oolites from .' 26, 767 

-— , Distribution of allanite in 28, 471 

— , Glacial ice-dam in the Allegheny River j, 25, 84 

topography in 26, 215, 216 

— , Limestone of central 28, 166 

— (lower) igneous rocks of Diamond Hill-Cumberland district. . . . 26, 461-462 

Ordovician and Upper Cambrian sediments of Center County. , . . 24, 112 

— , Martinsburg shale in eastern 29, 94 

— (middle) igneous rock, Diamond Ilill-Cumberland district 26,463-474 

— , Note on a deep boring from near McDonald 24, 73, 275 

— , Oil development in 28, 622 

fields in 29, 96 

of 28, 561, 562 

— , Oolites of 26, 760 

— , Origin of white clays in 30, 96 

— Piedmont, Pre-Cambrian igneous rocks of the 26, 81 

— , Precambrian sedimentary rocks in 28, 156 

eastern 29, 375 

— rocks, Diamond Hill-Cumberland district 26, 446 

— sands as source of oil 28, 674 

— , Silurian formations in 27, 531 

— , Specimens of Ozarkian Stromatoporoids from 24, 115 

— strata, Marine f aimas in 29, 97 

— , Submerged "deeps" in Susquehanna River of 28, 335 

— , TuUy limestone and Genesee shale of 28, 207 

— welis discussed by Mr. Decker ' 29, 96 

Pennsylvanian of Tennessee ; L. C. Glenn 27, 70 

Penbose, R. a. F., Jb, ; Memoir of Persifor Frazer 2I, 5-12 

— , Memorial of Amos P. Brown by 29, 13 

— , Reference to war work of 80, 177 

Pebiodic table of Mendel^f cited on atomic weights of the elements. . 26, 190 



PERIPHERAL — ^PERSIA 225 

Pass 

Peripheral ranges of Asia and Europe 21, 190-199 

PKRisPRiNCTiNiC, Development of the costse in the 32, 152 

Perissodactyla ; J. W. Gidley 23, 85, 179 

— , Classification of 23, 179 

Perkins, G. H. ; Memorial of Henry Martyn Seely by 29, 65 

Perku^s, R. W. ; Photographs of Hawaiian Islands 28, 501 

Permanence of the continents and oceans ; W. B. Scott 24, 106 

Permian, Arid period of 27, 181 

— beds of northern Texas, Character of 21, 250 

— , Chelydrosauria from Texas 21, 75 

— floras in the western "red beds" ; David White 21, 75 

— glacial periods, Reference to 25, 589 

— glaciation 26, 578-588 

— of Brazil 30, 211 

New Mexico, Complete skeleton of a new group of large reptiles 

from the. 22, 95 

Texas, Mounted skeleton of Varanosaurus from the 22, 95 

— reptiles, New genus of ; S. W. Williston : . . . 21, 75, 250-283 

— Tetrapoda, Cranial elements in the 28, 973 

— vertebrates. New genera of 21, 75, 250-283 

, Explanation of plates 21, 283. 284 

Permo-carbonic conglomerates of south Brazil ; J. B. Woodwortb . . 21, 30, 779 
Permocarboniferous, Banded glacial slates of 27, 110 

— beds of Texas, Climatic oscillations in 25, 41 

— (?) conglomerate of Alaska 25, 199 

— ice age 27, 184 

Permo-Triassic formations of Arizona 30, 471, 491 

fossils 30, 471, 491 

of northwestern Arizona ; H. W. Shimer 30, 155, 471 

Pernambuco, Greology of 30, 291 

Peronopora, Development of 23, 361 

Perret, F. a., cited on condition of Stromboli, 1914 26, 387 

"Pele's Tears" 27, 53 

"repose" conditions of Vesuvius 26, 376 

volcanic vents 28, 253, 255, 265, 274 

Perry, Alexis, First scientific observation of Alaskan earthquake by. . . 

21, 398, 399 

Perrier, , cited on island subsidence 29, 493 

Perrt, J. H., Analysis of porphyry by 25, 469 

riebeckite-porphyry by 25, 466 

-T cited on Bellingham series .- 25, 449 

granite dike 25, 468 

Milford granite 25, 454 

Quincy granite 25, 465 

porphyry 25, 463 

— , Mapping of quartz diorite area by 25, 452 

— , Work in the Diamond Hill-Cumberland district by 25, 438-441 

Persia, Petroleum supply of 28, 614 

XV — Bull. Qwou See. Am. 



226 J. STANLEY-BROWN INDEX TO VOLUMES 21 TO 30 

Persistknc'e of vents at Stromboli and Its bearing on volcanic mechan- 
ism : H. D. Washington 28,165,241) 

PKRr. Fossil flora of 29> 641 

— -, Oil fields of 28. 565 

— . Petroleum supply of 28. 611, 250 

— , Ueference to climatic chansres in 26, 482 

— . Tertiary and Pleistocene formations of 29« 165 

Petkbson, G., cited on allanite 28, 483 

Pktebsox, O. a. ; Artiodactyla 23, 86, 162 

— - cited on fossils from Niobrara Valley 29, 274 

geyser action 29, 18i> 

Uinta group 26, 418 

: Mounted skeleton of Diceratheriuw cooki Peterson in the Carnegie 

Museum (ex tempore) 22, 95 

— : New Artladactyls from the Tapper Eocene of the Uinta Basin, Utah 29, 153 
camel from the Miocene of Nebraska 22, 95 

— - titanotheres from Uinta formation of Utah 26, 144 

— ; Uevision of the pseudotapirs of the North American Eocene 29, 152 

I'ETRiE, W. M. F., cited on wind work along Isthmus of Suez 21, 581 

— , Reference to abrasion by wind-driven sands 26, 64 

Petrified coals and their bearing on the origin of coal ; E. C. Jeffrey. . 28, 130 
" — forests of Arizona," L. F. Ward, Reference to 21, 324 

— log natural bridge near Adamana, Arizona, Description of and view 

showing 21, 323-325 

Petrographic description. Objects and methods of; Charles P. Berkey.. 

24. 76. 719 

— details of Triassic rocks 27, 637 

— microscope, Polarized skylight and the 26, 120 

pETRooRAPHic-MicROscopic work, Granularity in 23, 37, 726 

, The Index-Ellipsoid In 24, 53, 681 

— province, Method of representing chemical relations of a 26, 43 

PKTROGRA.PH Y of Brazil 30, 222 

meteorites 27, 50 

Pennsylvania minerals 29, 381, 387 

the Ordovicic 27, 560 

Pacific islands ; R. A. Daly 27, 48, 325 

rocks of Diamond Hill-Cumberland district 26, 449 

Triassic igneous rocks 27, 56, 630, 643 

Petroleum, Analyses of 28, 719 

— and natural gas fields, Classification of 28, 158, 553 

— associated with faults and dikes, Occurrence of 23, 51, 728 

— fields of Mexico between the Tamesi and Tuxpan rivers, Gulf coast. 24, 73, 

253-273, 706 

northeastern Mexico, Location of 24, 253 

. See also oil fields. 

— geologist. Ethics of the 28, 157 

— in Canada ; W. G. Miller 28. 721 

Ohio and Indiana ; J. A. Bownocker 28, 667 



PETROLEUM ^PHILLIPS 227 

Page 

Petroleum industry and world's future supply 28, 603 

— , Relation between uplift and folding areas to occurrence and quality 

of 29, 87 

— , Symposium on the geology of 28, 156, 603, 735 

— . See also oil. 

Petbolooic, Mineralogic, and Economic Section, Organization of the... 22,67 

, Papers relating to 21, 32-34 

— nomenclature, Plea for uniformity and simplicity in ; G. M. Butler. . 26, 134 

— problems of the Pacific area, Topic B, Summer Meeting in California, 

1915 26, 390 

Petrologist, Significance of glass-making to 29, 102 

Petrology of a series of nepheline syenite, camptonite, monchiquite, and 

diabase dikes in middle Shenandoah Valley, Virginia ; Thomas L. 

Watson and Justus H. Cline 24, 53, 302-334, 682 

-^ — rutile-bearing rocks ; T. L. Watson 29, 100 

the Adirondack region 25, 244 

Petrunkevitch, Alexander; Paleozoic Arachnida-scorpions and spiders 

24,106 

— elected to Paleontological Society 25, 134 

Pettersson, Otto, cited on climatic stress of fourteenth century 27, 68 

connection between hydrographic and meteorologic phenomena . . 

25, 550-552 

— , Sun-spot hypothesis of ^ 25, 552 

Pfaeffers, in the Tyrol, Vadose origin of the mineral waters of 22, 120 

Pfafp, Friederich, cited on experimental geology 29, 175 

Phwnopora expansa beds, Anticosti island 21, 705 

Phalen, W. C, Analyses by 26, 203 

— cited on hypersthene akerite 27, 196, 206, 222 

unakite 27, 220 

— , Reference to "A new occurrence of unakite" by 27, 196, 206 

Philadelphia Academy of Science, Reference to letter of Secretary from 

21,744 
— , Pennsylvania, Twenty -seventh Annual Meeting of the Geological So- 
ciety of America, December 29, 30, and 31, 1914, held at 26, 1-128 

Philipfi, E., cited on sea sediments 28, 739 

Philippi, R. a., cited on Navidad fauna 29, 642 

Philippine Islands, Geologic and physiographic influences in the.... 28,315 

, Petroleum supply of the 28, 615 

Philippines, Physiographic control in the 26, 395 

Philups, a, H., Analyses by 27, 640-642 

— cited on Kilauean rock analysis 27, 54 

Lower Silurian rocks 27, 557 

on Pele's hair 27, 54 

Phillips, D. McN., cited on Petrolia oil pool 28, 575 

Phillips, F. C. ; Gases from Yellowstone thermal springs, Analysis by. 22, 117 

Phillips, J. A., cited on grits and sandstones 21, 633 

oolitic iron ore 25, 770 

— quoted on English Bunter sandstones of Triassic age 21, 643 



228 J. STANLEY-BROWN INDEX TO VOLUMES 21 TO 30 

PMPe 

Pmujps, J. A., Reference to bis "The red sauds of the Arabian desert" 21, 643 

Phillips, John, cited on fauna of the Ludlow 27* 394 

— , Reference to work on joint systems of 22, 167 

PHI1X.1P8, W. B., Reference to geological work of 25, 166 

Philosophical aspects of paleontology ; J. M. Clarke 30, 150 

Philosophy of geology and the order of the State 28, 159, 235 

Phcenix shale 29, 350 

Phoradendrox of the West Indies 29, 652 

Phosphate deiwsits of Europe, North Africa, and North America 30, 104 

Montana 27, 62 

, Origin of the Rocky Mountain 26, 100 

— rock an economic army ; R. W. Stone 30, 104 

Phosphates of Florida, Origin of the hard rock 24, 75, 716 

Phosphobus-beabing rocks of Amherst-Nelson counties, Virginia, Igne- 
ous complex of high Titanium 24, 53, 682 

— , Geological transformations of 27, 47 

Photograph of Alexandrian rock fossils 27, 324 

Gantts quarry 27, 449 

Mayville limestone 27, 323 

old Pleistocene valleys in western North Dakota 27, 299 

schistose marble 27, 442 

Photographs, Rei>ort of Committee on 21. 19 : 22, 52 ; 23, 55 ; 

24, 48 ; 25, 48 ; 26, 57 ; 29, 69 ; 30. 76 

Photography, Anderson's method of, in vertebrate iwleontologj* 21, 75 

— , Application to optical mineralogy of colo|: 23, 51 

Photomicrograph of schistose marble 27, 443 

Phrases, The expansion into their full meaning of condensed 23, 100 

Phyletic relationship of the lemuroidea ; W. K. Gregory 26, 141 

— series, True nature of a 24, 288 

I'hylloporina corticosa. Development of 23, 363 

Phylogenetic development of the HexacHnellid dictyosponges as indi- 
cated by the ortogeny of an Upper Devonian species ; J. M. Clarke 

25, 138 

— position of the genus Stegomylus ; F. B. Loomis 21, 75 

— review of extinct and recent anthroix)ids, with special reference to the 

evolution of the human dentition ; W. K. Gregory 27, 149 

Phylooeny and correlation, Certain theoretical considerations affecting ; 

W. D. Matthew 24, 118, 283-291 

paleontology ; Robert T. Jackson and D. P. Penhallow 21, 74 

— of certain Cerithiidse ; Elvira Wood 21, 76 

the Felidie; W. D. Matthew 21,74 

higher primates, Observations on the ; W. K. Gregory 26, 153 

Lemuroidea, On the classification and ; W. K. Gregory 26, 426 

Proboscidea 29, 133 

titanotheres 25, 403 

Phylum, Correlation of homotaxial stages of a 24, 288 

Physical and structural geology, Papers on 21, 22-25 



PHYSICAL PIRSSON 229 

Page 
Physical ebeiuical system, lime-alumlua-sillca, and its geological signifi- 
cance ; F. E. Wright and G. A. Rankin 26, 92 

— relations of serpentine, with special reference to the serpentine stock 

of Staten Island, New York ; W. O. Crosby 25, 87 

Physioobaphic and glacial geology. Papers on 21, 25-27 

Section, Meeting of 22, 64 

— control in the Philippines ; W. D. Smith 26, 395 

— evidence of recent subsidence on the coast of Maine ; Charles A. Davis 

27, 108 

— features of bolsons, Some ; H. E. Qregory 26, S92 

Cretaceous of Alberta 27, 674 

the Haywards Rift; D. M. Durst 25,123 

Virgin and northern Leeward islands 27, 41 

western Europe as a factor in the war ; D. W. Johnson 26, 110 

— notes on the White Mountains ; Douglas W. Johnson 27, 108 

— studies of the driftless area ; A. C. Trowbridge 26, 76 

— study of the Cretaceous-Eocene period in the Rocky Mountain front 

and Great Plains province ; G. H. Ashley 26. 105 

Physiography, Block diagrams of State ; A. K. Lobeek 26, 77 

— of the EJast African plateau ; George Lucius Collie 23, 49 

southern Adirondacks, Early Paleoswic 24, 72, 701 

Physiology and anatomy in extinct organiams 21, 74 

Piauhy, Geology of 30, 297 

Pic d*Aubore Section ; J. M. Clarke 26, 150 

Piedmont, Paleozoic deposits in the 29, 127 

— plateau, Maryland, Rock decay in 21, 570 

— terraces of the northern Appalachians and their mode of origin ; also 

post-Jurassic history of the northern Appalachians; Joseph Bar- 
ren 24, 70, 688 

Pierce County coal field of Washington, Structure of; Joseph Daniels. 26, 132 

Piebbe-Edmonton contact 25, 368 

— , Near-shore phase of the 26, 326 

Pillow lavas, Chronological table of 26, 629-633 

, Distribution of 25, 595 

, Origin of 25, 32, 691 

Pinnipeds from Miocene and Pleistocene d^xislts of (/Ulifornia ; Rem- 
ington Kellog 29, 161 

l*i0NEEBa in Gulf Coastal Plain geology ; E. A. Smith 29, 157 

PiBSSON, L. v., cited on Bermuda boring 29, 566 

classification of metamorphic roc-ks 28, 452, 455, 457 

metamorphism 28, 385 

petrography and geology of the igneous rocks of the High wood 

Mountains, Montana 21, 109 

— ; Crustal warping in the Temagami-Temiskamiug district, Ontario,. 

Reference to 22, 148 

— , Discussion of origin of thick salt and gypsum deiioslts by 26, 103 

— , Northumberland (New York) Volcanic Plug, discussed by 24, 54, 683 

— , Reference to "Textbook of Geolog>'" by 27, 352 



230 J. STANLEY-BROWN INDEX TO VOLUMES 21 TO 30 . 

PiBSSON, L. v., Report on Nomenclature of Faults discussed by 224, 49 

— , Text-book of geology 28, 782 

— , Visiting geologists welcomed to Yale University by 24, 2 

PisANiTE and some large Staurolites from Ducktown, Tennessee, A new 

occurrence of ; Frank R. Van Horn 24, 54, 686 

PiSHEL, M. A., cited on geology of Indian reservations 25, 350 

Pisolites at San Antonio, Texas ; Alexander Deussen 26, 398 

PiTHECANTHBOPus and Plltdowu and Neandertal man,, Restoration of; 

J. H. McGregor 26, 149 

PiTTSBUBGH, Pennsylvania, Proceedings of the Twenty-third Annual 

Meeting of the Geological Society of America, held December 27, 

28, and 29, 1910, at 22, 1 

— , Sketch of the local geology of the city of ; Percy E. Raymond. . . 22, 63, 721 

PiUTTi, A., cited on minerals not radioactive 26, 193 

Plains and valleys. Eastern Washington 23, 533 

— formations. Explanations of 22, 690 

— of the interior of Bahia, Brazil, Limestone 21, 790 

Plane-table for military mapping ; A. M. Bateman 30, 111, 405 

Planetisimal h5T)otheses, Geometric plans of the earth, with special 

reference to the 28, 124 

PiJiNT-BEABiNG beds in South America , 29, 637 

— migration. Rapidity of 2T, 527 

— tissue in the Carboniferous shales of Nebraska ; E. H. Barbour 24, 113 

PiJiNTS and human remains In Florida discussed by E. H. Sellards. . . 28,197 

— associated with human remains at Vero, Florida ; E. W. Berry 28, 197 

— , Correlation by fossil 27, 529 

— from Florissant, Colorado, Some interesting new 23, 88 

— , Use in geologic hiatuses of .- 27, 528 

Platania, G., cited on origin of pillow lavas 25, 653 

Stromboli 28, 262 

Plateau of British East Africa ; George Lucius Collie 23, 297-316 

— plain of Toyalan^ and Lucero, Dominant features of. ... 7 23, 713 

Platinum-gold lode deposit in southern Nevada ; Adolph Knopf 26, 85 

' Platt, F., cited on Silurian formations in Pennsylvania 27, 552 

Platyatrbphia ponderosa var. stcvetiaom var 24. 453 

Playfaib, John, Reference to work of. 29, 173 

Pleistocene and Pliocene Foraminifera from California 21, 76 

post-Pleistocene geology of Waterville, Maine; H. P. Little.. 28,167,309 

— , Arid zones of 27, 180 

— , Asphalt formation not later than Lower 26, 167 

— Avifauna of the Pacific coast, Number of species recorded 24, 132 

— beds in the Mohave Desert region 25, 156 

— cave deposit. Fauna of the Cumberland 26, 142 

— climatic oscillations, Graphic projection of ; C. A. Reeds 26, 106 

— deformation discussed by Joseph Barrell 28, 165 

A. P. Coleman 28, 165 

H. F. Reid 28,165 

F. B. Taylor 28, 165 



PLEISTOCENE PLEISTOCENE 231 

, Pag« 

Pleistocene deformation near Rutland, Vermont ; Arthur Keith 28* 1^ 

of Ontario basin, Table showing 27, 244 

— deposits, Alberta, Canada 24, 549, 552, 553, 559 

between Manilla, in Crawford County, and Coon Rapids, in Carroll 

County, Iowa ; G. F. Kay 29, 77 

in Iowa discussed by members 29, 78 

Montana 28, 149 

the Sun River region, Montana ; Eugene Steblnger and Marcus I. 

Goldman , 28, 149 

of Minnesota and adjacent districts ; Frank Leverett 27, 68 

, Perplexity of intermingling strata 23, 709 

, Pinnipeds from 29, 161 

, Sage Creek, Montana 24, 571 

— , Dire wolves of America 29, 161 

— drainage changes in western North Dakota ; Arthur G. Leonard . 27, 80, 295 

— fauna of Europe and North America, Comparison of the late; H. F. 

Osbom 24, 120 

— features in the Schenectady-Saratoga-Glens Falls section of the Hud- 

son Valley ; Herman L. Fairchild / 27, 65 

— formations, Intermingling of 23, 48, 709-712, 738 

of Peru 29, 165 

— fossils 28, 309 

— geology of New England, Bibliography of 30, 632 

New York State ; Annual address of the President, Herman L. 

Fairchild 24, 54, 133 

— glacial period, Reference to 25, 589 

— ice age 27, 183 

— igneous rocks and thermal waters 22, 106 

• — isobases ' 27, 253 

--mammal fauna of Hawver Cave, a fissure deposit near Auburn, (Cali- 
fornia ; Chester Stock 27, 169 

— man, Geologic deposits in relation to ; C. A. Reeds 26, 109 

— map 27, 253 

— marine submergence of the Connecticut and Hudson valleys: H. L. 

Fairchild 25, 63, 219 

— of Aftonian beds, Stratigraphic relation of 21, 125 

Europe and America, Correlation of the 21, 75 

New York, Peccaries of 26, 150 

Sioux Falls, South Dakota, and vicinity ; B. Shiniek 23, 125-154 

the vicinity of Omaha, Nebraska, and Council Bluffs, Iowa; B. 

Shimek 22, 65, 730 

Sioux Falls, South Dakota (abstract) ; B. Shimek... 22,65,730 

western Washington ; J. H. Bretz 26, 131 

— period in the Psychozoic era 30, 149 

— phenomena, New York State excels any other e<iual area in 24, 134 

of central Massachusetts ; W. C. Alden *21, 31 

— publications, Important New York State Museum 24, 162 

— rodeo. Fauna of 27, 169 



232 j. stanley-brown index to volumes 21 to 30 

pmpb 

Pleistocene shoreline in Maine and New Hampshire, Late 29i 74 

— species, Pavo califomicus 2Tf 171 

— submergence at Gasp6 29, 217 

of Hudson Valley and New Jersey 29, 188 

— succession in Wisconsin ; Samuel Wiedman 24, 71 

— uplift in New York, Bibliography of 27, 255 

of New York and adjacent territory ; Herman L. Fairchild. . . 27, 66, 235 

— valley of Missouri and Yellowstone rivers 27, 290 

— valleys in western North Dakota, Photographs of 27, 299 

of western North Dakota, Outline map of 27, 297 

Plesiosaubian genus from Nebraska, Measurements of new 24, 121 

the Niobrara Cretaceous of Nebraska; S. W. Williston and Roy 

L. Moodie 24, 120 

PLEUBACANTHiDiS, Craulum of the 23, 87 

Pliocene and Pleistocene Foraminifera from California ; Rufus M. Bagg, 

Jr 21, 76 

— extension of the Gulf of Lower California 29, 164 

— fauna of Thousand Creek : 28, 226 

— floras 30, 536 

— Jacalltos formations, Vertebrate faunal zones of 27, 172 

— mammalian faunas of North America ; J. C. Merriam 28, 196 

— monodactylous horse 27, 151 

— , Notes on American rhinoceroses 29, 153 

— of eastern Oregon, Review of the fauna of the Rattlesnake.' 26, 169 

Idaho, Tulare 29, 152 

Pacific coast 27, 172 

the west coast. Reference to 29, 308 

— Pleistocene uplifts. Pulsatory nature of 28, 747 

Plummeb, F. G., Reference to list of earthquakes on the Pacific coast 

of 21, 400 

PocY, , cited on tropical hurricanes 25, 494 

PoGUE, J. E., Discussion of formite by 25, 90 

physical-chemical system of 25, 92 

— ; Emerald deposits of Muzo, Colombia 27, 63 

— ; Geology on a basis of citizenship 30, 77 

PoHLMAN, Juuus, cited on the Whirlpool -Saint Davids Valley 21, 434 

PoiJkRizED skylight and the petrographic microscope ; U. S. T. Smith. . . 25, 120 

PoLYPH YLETic genera 24, 109 

Pompeii and Herculaneum, Sand at 21, 630 

PoMPEBAuo Valley, Newark system of the, Reference to 22, 131 

— — system of Connecticut, Fracture fields in 22, 155, 167 

I'oNDViLLE arkoses of Narragaiisett series 25, 447 

Pont d'Abc, France, Description and map showing origin of 21, 316, 317 

: A natural bridge acroj^s the ArdOche River, France 21, 317 

PoNTE, G., cited on Stromboli 28, 252, 253 

Poole, H. H., cited on the conductivity of the earth's crust 26, 196 

Pope, John, Reference to survey work, by 25, 165 

Popo Agie beds 29, 595 



POPULAR — POTTSVILLB 233 

Page 
PopuLAB Science Monthly, Ck)nference papers of the First Annual Meet- 
ing of the Paleontologlcal Society puhlished in the 22, 87 

PoBT NEL80I7 limestones 30* 367 

— Rowan, Lake Erie, Interglacial beds in Canada first located at 21, 435 

Portage stratigraphy in western New York ; G. H. Chadwick SO, 157 

PoBTO Rico, Fossil mammals from . . . ^ 28, 209 

, Geologic history of 2T, 83 

, Geological reconnaissance of 26, 113, 156 

, Recent changes of level in 29, 138 

Position of the New England upland in the White Mountains ; Armin K. 

Lobeck 27,108 

PosNJAK, EuoEK, and Mebwin, H. E. ; Definition and determination of 

the mineral hydroxides of iron 27, 61 

Post-Chazt age, Pamelia, Lowville, and Black rivers, Canada, parts of 

one group of 24, 111 

— Cretaceous floras 26, 334 

unconformity. New Mexico and Colorado 23, 612 

Postglacial age of lower Little Missouri Valley, Evidence of 27, 302 

— deformation of the Ontario region , . 26, 65 

Post-Gi^cial earth movements from the Lake region to the Saint Law- 
rence Valley, Extended determination of ; J. W. Spencer 24, 74, 

217-227, 714 

— erosion and oxidation ; George Frederick Wright 23, 47, 277-296, 733 

, New York State 24, 160 

— literature, Bibliography of 29, 229 

— marine submergence of Long Island ; H. L. Fairchild 28, 142, 279 

— time, A method of measuring 28, 138 

— uplift of northeastern America ; H. L. Fairchild 29, 70, 187 

southern New England ; H. L. Fairchild 30, 597 

the New England coastal region ; H. L. Fairchild 30, 89 

— waters in Hudson-Champlain Valley 30, 90 

Post-Lacustbine deformation 27, 668 

Post-Obdovician deformation in the Saint Lawrence Valley, New York ; 

G. H. Chadwick 26, 115, 287-294 

Post-Tebtiabt history of the lakes of Asia Minor and Syria ; Ellsworth 

Huntington 21, 20, 755 

PosTMA, G. E. ; Trachytic perlite from Ix)ne Hill, near San Jos6, Cali- 
fornia 24, 94 

Potash slates 30, 112 

Pot-hole action. Natural bridges formed by 21, 321 

Potomac group, Age of the 26, 336 

— Invertebrate fauna 26, 345 

Potoni£, H., cited on origin of oil 28, 729 

"Potsdam" and "calciferous" formations no more recognized 26, 288 

Pottsviixe-Aixeoheny boundary in the interior province (Illinois and 

Missouri coal fields) ; David White 24, 75, 716 

PoTTSViLLE formation of Maryland SO, 571 

— in Ohio unconformity compared with Berea 26, 213 



234 J. STANLEY-BROWN INDEX TO VOLUMES 21 TO 30 

PouBTALfes, L. F. DE, Reference to work of '. 28, 738 

Powell, Captain, Reference to expedition to Florida 25, 162 

Powell, J. W., cited on dry regions of western United States 21, 567 

monoclinal fold 27, 90 

— , Committee appointed to confer with 21, 743 

— ; Establishment of a geological magazine favored by 21, 743 

— , Reference to 25, 177 

— , Secretary instructed to transmit resolution to the Secretary of the 

Interior approving naming a national park on the Grand Canyon 

of the Colorado after 23, 45 

— , Use of name "Uinta" by 25, 417 

Powell National Park, Resolution concerning the naming of 23, 45 

"Powell Park of the Grand Canyon," Name recommended by committee 

and approved by a resolution of the Society 23, 45 

Powell, S. L., and Watson, T. S. ; Paper on fossils of Quantico slate belt 

and slates of the Virginia crystalline regions 31, 782 

Powers, Sidney, Acadian Triasslc 26, 93 

— , Basic rocks of Rhode Island discussed by 26, 92 

— ; Geological history of the Bay of Fundy 26, 94 

— introduced by R. A. Daly 26, 93, 94 

— ; Ordovician strata beneath the Healdton oil field, Oklahoma 28, 159 

— ; Tectonic lines in the Hawaiian Islands 27, 109 

— and Warren, C. H. ; Geology of the Diamond Hill-Cumberland district 

In Rhode Island-Massachusetts 25, 435 

Practical application of geological structure theories to oil recovery; 

I. C. White ; 28, 157 

Praspora, Development of 23, 358 

Pratt, J. H., cited on allanlte 28, 477 

attraction of the Himalayan range 26, 178 

— ; Memorial of Joseph Austin Holmes 27, 22 

— ; New occurrence of monazite in North Carolina 24, 54, 686 

— , State Geologist of North Carolina 25, 160 

pRECAMBRiAN bacterla 28, 246 

— classification in Ontario, Revision of; W. G. Miller and C. W. Knight 26,87 

— deserts. Late 27, 182 

— formations in south-central British Columbia ; Reginald A. Daly 23, 36, 721 

— granite, Instrusion of Black Hills 27, 104 

— ice age. Late 27, 186 

— igneous rocks of Diamond Hill-Cumberland district 25, 449-452 

the Pennsylvania Piedmont ; F. Basconi 26, 81 

— metamorphic rocks of Alaska 25, 184 

— nomenclature discussed by members 29, 91-92 

— in Saint Lawrence basin, Limitations of 29, 90 

— of southeastern Ontario, Paper by Willet G. Miller and Cyril W. 

Knight 22. 55 

Sw^eden, and American taxonomic parallels, Paper by James F. 

Kemp on ; 22, 55, 719 

the Adirondacks 30, 155 



PRECAMBRIAN PRESIDENT 235 

Page 
Pkecambrian rocks ; Blackstone series of Diamond Hill-Cumberland dis- 
trict 26, 440 

in the Medicine Bow Mountains of Wyoming ; E. Blackwelder and 

IT. F. Crooks. 29, 97 

of Ogdenburg-Canton quadrangle 26, 287 

, Origin of foliation in New York of 27, 57 

— sedimentary rocks in the highlands of eastern Pennsylvania; E. T. 

Wherry 28, 156 ; 29, 375 

of Alaska 25, 187 

— structure of the Black Hills, South Dakota ; Sidney Paige 27, 106 

northern Black Hills as bearing on the Homestake oref body ; 

Sidney Paige 24, 73, 293-300, 704 

— unconformity in Vermont ; A. Keith ; 25, 39 

Precipitation, Historic changes in 25, 542 

— (level of maximum) as a factor in the glaciation of Mount Rainier; 

F. E. Matthes 24, 72, 701 

— , Relation of run-oflf to 26, 223 

Pbecise leveling and the problem of coastal subsidence ; D. W. Johnson . 25, 59 

Phe-Cbetaceous Dinosaurs ; W. J. Holland 23, 85, 204 

PREDENTATE diuosaurs, Species found of 26, 329 

Pre-Glacial course of the upper Hudson River; William J. Miller. .. . 22,64, 

177-186 

— drainage of central western New York ; A. W. Grabau 21, 31 

— Erie outlet 24, 231 

— geology of the Puget Sound basin, Notes on the 23, 75 

— Miami and Kentucky rivers ; N. M. Fenneman 23, 51, 736 ; 25, 85 

pRE-HuRONiAN land conditions 27, 188 

Prelimuvary geologic map of the Wayan quadrangle, Idaho- Wyoming ; 

George R. Mansfield 27, 65 

— reix)rt of the committee on the nomenclature of the skull elements in 

the Tetrapoda ; W. K. Gregory 27, 152 

Pre-Onondaga jointing at Amherstburg, Ontario, Photograph of 27, 74 

Pre-Pleistocene geology in the vicinity of Seattle; C. E. Weaver 26,130 

Presence of a median eye in trilobites ; Rudolph Ruedemann 27, 146 

Present status of areal mapping in the Coastal Plain and of the paleon- 

tologic investigations in the Coast Plain, Panama, and Windward 

Islands ; T. W. Vaughan 28, 205 

the problem of the origin of loess ; C. W. Tomlinson 20, 73 

Presentation of geologic information for engineering purposes; T. W. 

Vaughan 30, 79 

President, Annual address of 22, 55 ; 23, 49 ; 24, 54 ; 

25, 48 ; 26, 86, 171 ; 27, 175 ; 28, 159 ; 29, 167 ; 30, 117 

— , Election of F. D. Adams as 28, 12 

G. F. Becker as 25,5 

J. M. Clarke as 27,11 

A. P. Coleman as 26, 11 

Whitman Cross as 20, 11 

-W. M. Davis as 22,2 



236 J. STANLEY-BROWN ^INDEX TO VOLUMES 21 TO 30 

Pife 

Pbesident, Election of H. L. Faircblld as 23, 2 

Arnold Hague as 21, 2 

John C. Merrlam as 30, 11 

E. A. Smith as 24,9 

--, Paleontologica! Society, Annual address of 22, 92 ; 24, 106 ; 26, 130 ; 

26, 151 ; 27, 149 ; 28, 205 ; 29, 129 ; 80, 151 

, Election of R. T. Jackson as SO, 147 

F. H. Knowlton as 29,125 

J. C. Merrlam as 28, 195 

H. F. Osborn as 26,133 

Rudolph Ruedemann as 27, 144 

Charles Schuchert as 21,83 

W. B. Scott as 22,89 

E. O. Ulrich as 26,146 

C. D. Walcott as 24, 104 

David White as 23,89 

PsEssuBE, Effect on solid substances of high 24, 50, 675 

— on rocks and minerals, Some effects of ; John Johnston 26, 83 

Pbebtwich, Sib Joseph, cited on monoclines 27, 91 

metamorphism , . . 28, 380 

Pbe-Tbiabsic basement, Character of 27, 688 

Pbevaiuno stratigraphic relationships of the bedded phosphate deposits 

of Europe, North Africa, and North America 30, 104 

Pbe- Wisconsin channels in 8outheaste];n South Dakota and northeastern 

Nebraska; J. E. Todd 23,46,463-470 

— drift of the Keewatin ice-sheet, Deductions from relations of 24, 545 

on the Blackfoot peneplain 24, 536 

— glacial drift in the region of Glacier Park, Montana; William C. 

Alden and Eugene Stebinger 23, 44, 687-708 ; 24, 71, 529-572 

National Park, Montana, Summary of paper on . 24, 569 

Price, W. A., Jb., Swabtz, C. K., and Bassleb, Harvet ; Coal Me^ures 

of Maryland 30, 57 

; Stratigraphy and correlation of the Coal Measures of Mary- 
land 30. 154 

Price sandstone, Misslssippian delta of Virginia 23, 450 

Primates, Characters tending to allay Tupailds and 24, 248 

~ ; William K. Gregory 23, 194 

— , Marsupials, and Insectivores ; W. K. Gregory 23, 86, 187 

— , Observations on the phylogeny of the higher 26, 153 

Primitella n. sp.. Fossil of the Quartzite at Geneva 21, 527 

Pbince of Monaco cited on sea deposits 28, 738 

Prince William Sound and Kenai Peninsula. Alaska, Tidewater glaciers 

of 21, 20, 757 

Principles governing the use of fossil plants in geologic correlfttion; 

F. H. Knowlton 27, 625 

— in the determination of boundaries ; A. P. Brigham 30, 105 

— of classification of Cyclostome bryozoa ; F. Canu and R. S. Bassler. 29, 151 
Pbindle, L. M., cited on Devonian limestone of. Alaska 25, 103 



PRINDLE PROCJEEDINGS 237 

Page 

Pbindle, L. M., Geological work in Alaska by 25, 180 

Prior, G. T., cited on pillow lavas 26, 604 

— , Reference to division of igneous rocks advocated by 21, 114 

Pbjevalsky, X. M., Reference to work of 28, 738 

Problem of correlation by use of vertebrates ; W.^D. Matthew 26, 411 

tbe anorthosUes ; N. L. Brown 28, 154 

interpretation of sedimentary ro<'ks ; A. W. Grabau 28, 735 

Texas Tertiary sands ; K. T. Dumble 26, 447 

PBCffiosciDEA, Generic nomenclature of 29, 141 

— , Phylogeny of 29, 133 

Proboscideaits, Af tonian mammalian f nuna 22, 212 

Proceedings of the Twenty-second Annual Meeting of the Geological So- 
ciety of America, held at Boston and Cambridge, Massachusetts, 
December 28, 29, 30, and 31, 1900 ; Edmund Otis Hovey, Secretary. 21, 1 
Twenty-third Annual Meeting of the Geological Society of Amer- 
ica, held at Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, December 27, 28, and 29, 

1910 ; Edmund Otis Hovey, Secretary 22, 1 

Twenty-fourth Annual Meeting of the Geological Society of 

America, held at Washington, D. C, December 27, 28, 29, and 30, 

1911 ; Edmund Otis Hovey, Secretary 23, 1 

— Twenty-flfth Annual Meeting of the Greological Society of Amer- 
ica, held at New Haven, (Connecticut, December 28, 29, 30, and 31, 

1912 ; Edmund Otis Hovey, Secretary 24, 1 

Twenty-sixth Annual Meeting of the Geological Society of Amer- 
ica, held at Princeton, New Jersey, December 30 and 31, 1913, and 

January 1, 1914 ; Edmund Otis Hovey, Secretar>' 25, 1 

Twenty-seventh Annual Meeting of the Geological Society of 

America, held at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, December 29, 30, and 

31, 1914 ; Edmund Otis Hovey, Secretary 26, 1 

Twenty-eighth Annual Meeting of the Geological Society of Amer- 
ica, held at Washington, District of Columbia, December 28, 29, 

and 30, 1915 ; Charles P. Berkey, Secretary pro tern 27, 1 

Twenty-ninth Annual Meeting of the Geological Society of Amer- 
ica, held at Albany, New York, December 27, 28, and 29, 1916; 

Charles P. Berkey, Secretary pro tern 28, 1 

Thirtieth Annual Meeting of the Geological Society of America, 

held at Saint Louis, Missouri, December 27, 28, and 29, 1917 ; Ed- 
mund Otis Hovey, Secretary 29, i 

Thlrty-flrst Annual Meeting of the Geological Society of America, 

held at Baltimore, Maryland, December 27-28, 1918 ; Edmund Otis 

Ilovey, Secretary SO, i 

Summer Meeting of the Geological Society of America, held at 

the University of California and at Stanford University, August 

3, 4, and 5, 1915 ; J. A. CDaff, Secretary pro tern 26, 389 

Second Annual Meeting of the Paleontological Society, held at 

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, December 28-29, 1910 ; Ray Smith Bass- 

ler, Secretar3' 22, 85 



238 J. STANLEY-BROWN INDEX TO VOLUMES 21 TO 30 

Proceedings of the Third Annual Meeting of the Paleontologlcal Society, 
held at Washington, D. C, December 28, 29, and 30, 1911 ; R. S. 
Bassler, Secretary 23, 77 

Fourth Annual Meeting of the Paleontologlcal Society, held at 

New Haven, Connecticut, December 30 and 31, 1912 ; R. S. Bassler, 
Secretary .' 24. 99 

Fifth Annual Meeting of the Paleontologlcal Society, held at 

Princeton, New Jersey, December 31, 1913, and January 1, 1914; 

R. S. Bassler, Secretary 25, 127 

Sixth Annual Meeting of the Paleontologlcal Society, held at 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, December 29, 30, and 31, 1914 ; R. S. 
Bassler, Secretary 26, 141 

Seventh Annual Meeting of the Paleontologlcal Society, held at 

Washington, District of Columbia, December 29, 30, and 31, 1915 ; 

R. S. Bassler, Secretary 27» 139 

Eighth Annual Meeting of the Paleontologlcal Society, held at 

Albany, New York, December 27. 28, and 29, 1916 ; R. S. Bassler, 
Secretary 28, 189 

Ninth Annual Meeting of the Paleontologlcal Society, held at 

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, December 21, 1917, and January 1 and 2, 

1918 ; R. S. Bassler, Secretary 29, 119 

Tenth Annual Meeting of the Paleontologlcal Society, held at 

Baltimore, Maryland, December 28, 1918 ; R. S. Bassler, Secretary 

30. 143 

Summer Meeting of the Paleontologlcal Society, held at the Uni- 
versity of California and at Stanford University, August 3, 4, 5, 
and 6, 1915 ; Chester Stock, Secretary pro tern 26, 409 

Proctor, John R., on committee Cincinnati meeting, 1881 21, 742 

Producta cora. Fossil of Wasatch region 21, 530 

Productivity of oil shales ; D. T. Day 28, 157 

Productua gallatinenaia, Fossil of Wasatch region 21, 530; 

— nehraakenaiSf Fossil of Wasatch region 21, 530 

— semireticulatusyeiT, hermosanuSj Fossil of Wasatch region 21, 530 

Profiles and structures in desert ranges, Summary of 21, 562, 663 

PROLOGHOANITES, Relation of the Holochoanites and Orthochoanites to 30, 148 
Proposed correlation of the Pacific and Atlantic Eocene ; R. E. Dickerson 

29, 148 

Prospect Falls on side of the preglaclal gorge 23, 485 

Prosser, C. S., Bibliography of 28, 76 

— cited on articles on Upper Siluric strata 2T, 72 

Berea-Bedford contact at Warner Hollow, Ashtabula County, 

Ohio 26, 214 

Cussewag sandstone 2©, 210 

Kansas oil fields 28, 687 

Sherburne sandstone 30, 424, 426 

— , Dedication of paper to 30, 423 

— , Discussion of classification of aqueous habitats by 26, 159 

Hamilton group of western New York by 26, 113 



PROSSER PYROXENE 239 

rase 
PROSHER, C. S., Discussion of North Aiiiericnn continent in Upper Devonic 

time by 26, 89 

— elected Councilor 21,3 

— , Memorial of 28, 70 

— , Resolution of tbanks 23, 51 

— . Unconformity at the base of the Berea sandstone in Ohio discussed 

by 26, 96, 155 

Pbouty, W. F. ; Crystalline graphite deposits of Alabama 30, 112 

marbles of Alabama 26,104; 27,6;?, 437 

--; Further evidence of the aeje of the crystalline and semi-crystalline 

rocks in Alabama 30, 113 

— and SwABTZ, C. K. ; Silurian system of Maryland 27, 89 

PsEUDOTAFiBS of the North American Eocene 29, 152 

PsYCHOzoic period, Inclusion in the Pleistocene of the 30, 149 

Ptebygoid, epipterygoid, and alisphenoid, Relations of 24, 244 

Publication, Report of Committee on 21, 17 

— rules of the Geological Society 25, 101 ; 30, 138 

Pi'EBco fauna compared with other faunas 25, 387 

— formation 25, 338, 382 

— without equivalent in Europe 25, 396 

PuQET Sound basin, Notes on the pre-Glacial geology of the 23, 75 

Pugnax Hall and Clarke 21, 508 

— pugnns (Martin), B^gure showing and description of 21, 508 

Pugnoides, n. gen 21, 512 

— ottumica (White), Figure showing and description of 21, 512 

Pulaski shale, Misslssippian delta of Virginia 23, 448 

Pulse of life. 28, 197 

PuMA-LiKK cats of Raucho La Brea ; J. C. Merriam 29, 161 

PuMPELLY, R., cited on deposits of eastern China 21, 639 

Keweenaw series 27, 94 

— , Reference to work of 28, 738 

PuBDUE, A. H., Arkansas diamond-bearing peridotlte area discussed by. . 

23, 37, 726 

— , Discussion of Colorado glaclation by 25, 32 

Tennessee shale by 28, 207 

— elected chairman session of Saturday, December 30, 1911 23, 49 

— , Geological work In Arkansas of 25, 167 

Tennessee of 25, 168 

— , Memorial and bibliography of 29, 55, 60 

— , Report on Nomenclature of Faults discussed by 24, 49 

PuBGATOiBE formation, Berry and Haug cited on 26, 307 

P^'BOTHEBiUM bcds of Patagoula, Preliminary discussion of the stratig- 
raphy and age of the ; Frederick B. Loomis 24, 52, 107 

— fauna. Analysis of 25, 140 

— mammals, Restoration of 25, 139 

Pyboxene-beabing artificial melts. Crystallization of 25, 91 

— , Reference by Watson and Cline to 27, 231 



240 * J. STANLEY-BROWN INDEX TO VOLUMES 21 TO 30^ 

Pyboxene syenite, Hypersthene syenite compared with 27, 212 

of Adirondacks compared with hypersthene syenite 27, 212 

Pyboxenite, Analyses of 27> 232 

— , (imposition and classification of 27, 232 

— , pyrrhotlte, and norite from Litchfield, Connecticut; Ernest Howe... 26,83 

Q 

QuANTico slate belt. Discovery of fossils of 21, 31, 782 

Quantitative classification, EflPusive and intrusive in the 25, 43 

QuAJiRY methods 27, 448 

QuARTZ-BEABiNo hyperstheue-andeslne syenite 27, 197 

— — igneous rocks 27, 331 

— , Changes caused by rise of temperature in 26, 44 

— deposits of Diamond Hill 26, 471 

— diorite of Diamond Hill-Cumberland district 26, 452 

— gabbro (tonalose ( ?) ) in Virginia, Analysis and norm of 24, 311-313 

— , Megascopic and microscopic character and chemical com- 
position and classification of 24, 311-313 

— monzonite compared with hypersthene syenite 27, 204 

— monzonites, Analyses of. 27, 205 

QuABTZiTE at Geneva, Ogden quartzite now called 21, 527 

— , Cataldo 23, 527 

— , Occurrence of granite or Sioux 21, 124 

— series of the Wasatch region, Exposure and thickness of 21, 520 

QuABTZiTES of SilveT City, Kansas. . . : 28, 164, 419 

QUATEBNABY, Auts of the 28, 244 

— deformation in southern Illinois and southeastern Missouri; E. W. 

Shaw 26, 67 

— deposits of Alaska • 26, 202 

— fauna compared with other faunas 26, 387 

— lakes in the Mississippi basin, A system of ; E. B. Shaw 22, 66, 732 

— Tertiary orogenic history of the* Sierra Nevada 27, 46 

QUATBEFAOES, , cited ou the Philippines 28, 515 

QuEENSTON shales 26, 285 

QUEBCUS of the West Indies 29, 650 

QuEBEAU, E. C, cited on glacial lakes in the Adirondacks 27, 660 

— ; Reference to his "Topography and history of Jamesville Lake" . . . 24, 154 

Question of paleo-ecology ; F. B. Clements 29, 154 

QuicKsiLVEB deposits 30, 112 

QuiNGY granite. Analysis of 26, 466 

— , Massachusetts, Pegmatite in' granite of 21, 33, 784 

QuiBKE, T. T., cited on topography of Kildeer Mountains 27, 304 

R 

Radiation in glacial fiow as a factor in Drumlin formation ; William C. 

Alden 22. 66, 733 

— , Paleontologic evidences of adaptive. 21, 74 



RADIOACTIVE ^KAULIN 241 

Pag« 
Radioactive heat 30, 544 

— minerals from Texas, List of 28, 870 

Radioactivity and isostasy ; G. F. Becker 26, 86, 171-204 

— as a basis of time measurements 28, 842 

Radiou)ot, Recent advances In 26, 180 

Radium referred to by Van H. Manning 27, 25 

RAI17FALL in arid regions of the United States 21, 509 

New Mexico and Arissona, Records of 25, 535 

the United States, Records of 25, 538 

Raisin, G. A., cited on origin of pillow lavas 25, 639 

spheroidal rocks 25, 601 

Ramakn, E., cited on organic deposits 28, 740 

Rammelsberg, C. F., cited on allanite 28, 472 

Ramsay, W., cited on English boulder conglomerates 27, 184 

I Lower Silurian 27, 558 

Old Red Sandstone 27, 379 

Rancho La Bbea beds. Age of 21, 792 

, Bison of 27, 170 

, Fauna of 25, 155 

, Mammalian remains at 25, 156 

, Mylodont sloths of 27, 170 

, Puma-like cats of 29, 161 

Range of land vertebrates in typical American formations 25, 387 

Rankin, 6. A., The binary systems of alumina, lime, and magnesia. Ref- 
erence to 21, 166 

Ransome, F. L., cited on origin of pillow lavas 25, 618, 639, 653 

— , Discussion on volcanic action by 21, 23, 768 

— elected on Auditing Committee 21, 2 

— , On CJommittee on the Nomenclature of Faults 24, 163 

— , Reference to his paper, "Economic Geology" 24, 163 

— , Report of Auditing Committee presented by 21, 23 

— , Emmons, W. H., and Garbey, G. H. ; Geology and ore deposits of the 

Bullfrog district, Nevada, Reference to 22, 154 

Raphistomina lauretitina (Billings) from Romalne Island 21, 687 

Rateau, M. a., cited on oil in igneous rocks 28, 593 

Rath, G., cited on Loja Basin fossils 29, 640 

Raton coal field, New Mexico, Unconformity in the so-called Laramie of 

the, by Willis Thomas Lee 22, 54, 717 

Raton formation 25, 329 

, Correlation of the 25, 334 

, Fossil flora of the 25,331-333 

— Mesa region of Colorado and New Mexico, Coal-bearing rocks of the 24, 114 

— range. New Mexico, Mesa de Maya of the 21, 561 

— section. New Mexico, Correlation with the 23, 610 

Rattlesnake Pliocene of eastern Oregon, Review of the fauna of the. 26, 169 

Ratzel, F., cited on the Philippines 28, 515 

Raulin, Victor, cited on experiments with sand grains 21, 642 

XVI — Bull. Geol. Soc. Am. 



242 J.STANLEY-BROWN INDEX TO VOLUMES 21 TO 30 

Page 
Uay. J. C : Examples of successive replacement of earlier sulphide min- 
erals by later sulphides at Butte, Montana 26, 402 

— hitro<luced by C. F. Tolman, Jr 26, 402 

Raymond, P. E., De Lorme 13. Cairnes introduced by 23, 48 

— ; Chazy formation in the Ottawa Valley, by 22, 02, 719 

— cited on Coal Measure section of Maryland 30, 582, 586 

fauna of Mlngan formation 21, 600 

"Unsen" 27, 599 

Orthoceras limestone 27, 601 

proix)8ed name **Walchou: formation" 27. 598 

— ; Correlation of the Middle Ordovician formation of Ontario and Que- 
bec 24, 111 

-, Discussion of Paleozoic stratigraphy about Three Forks, Montana, 

by 26. 157 

— , Introduction of Richard M. Field by 28, 166 

— quoted on fauna of the Mlngan series 21, 693 

— , Reference to photograph of limestone by 28, 806 

**The correlation of the Ordovician strata of tlie Baltic basin 

with those of eastern North America" of 27, 590 

— . Richmond formations of Ontario and Quebec discussed by 24, 110 

— ; Sketch of the local geology, city of Pittsburgh 22, 63, 721 

— ; Some fundamental points in the classification of trllobites 28, 209 

Raymond, Rossiteb W., Memoir of William Phlpps Blake by 22, 36 

Read, T. I., <?ited on beach cusps 21, 604 

Read, T. T., Discussion of Park City minerals by 25, 47 

Reade, T. M., cited on chemical denudation : 28, 819, 834 

Reaoan, a. B., cited on Supai fauna 30, 492 

Recent addition to our knowledge of California Cenozoic Echinoids; 

W. D. Kew 28, 226 

— earthquakes in Panama and their causes ; D. F. MacDonald 25, 34 

of Porto Rico; H. F. Reid and S. Taber 30,83 

— results in the phylogeny of the titanotheres ; H. F. Osborn 25, 403 

— studies on skull structure of Thalattosaurus ; John C. Merrlam and 

Charles L. Camp 27, 171 

Recession of Niagara Falls remeasured in 1914 ; J. W. Spencer 27, 78 

Reck, F. B., cited on Tendagum series 29, 265 

Reconnaissance of the Algonkian rocks of south and east Newfound- 
land ; A. F. Buddington 25, 40 

Reconstruction of extinct animals 27, 153 

Records of Lake Agassiz discussed by J. B. Tyrrell 28, 146 

in southeastern Manitoba and adjacent parts of Ontario, Can- 
ada ; W. A. Johnston 28, 145 

three very deep wells drilled in the Appalachian oil fields of Penn- 
sylvania and West Virginia ; I. C. White 29, 96 

Rectigradations and allometrons in relation to the conception of the 
"mutations of Waagen" of species, genera, and phyla ; H. F. Os- 
born 25, 142,411 

Rectilinear features in the eastern Catskills : George H. Chadwlck . . 27, 107 



RED REFRACTION 243 

Pags 
Red Bed gypsum deposits of western Wyoming, Conditions of the upper 

26,222 

— Beds between Wichita Falls, Texas, and Las Vegas, New Mexico, in 

relation to their vertebrate fauna ; E. C. Case 24, 52, 679 

(Chug^'ater formation) of western Wyoming, Description of 26,218 

(eastern Oklahoma), Origin of the sediments and coloring matter 

of ; J. W. Beede 23, 36, 723 

, Juniata and Queenston ^ 24, 430 

of New Mexico 25,81 

Wasatch region, Location of 21. 529 

western Wyoming, Origin of ; E. B. Branson 26, 61, 217-230 

Wyoming discussed by E. B. Branson 28, 168 

B. Haworth... 28,168 

Arthur Keith 28, 169 

, Lithogenesis and stratigraphy of 27, 120 

, Permian floras In the western 21, 75 

Red Deer River canyon, Horizontal geologic section of 25, 363 

, Generalized section of the Bad Lands of 25, 364-365 

geologic section 25, 359-360 

section, Summary of the 25, 371-379 

— sandstones of southeastern Minnesota ; C. W. Hall 21, 30 

Redwaix limestone 30. 491 

Redwood, Sib Bovebton, cited on origin of oil 28, 731 

Reed, W. G. ; Climatic provinces of the t'nited States west of the Rockies 

25,124 

— ; Variations in rainfall in California 25, 121 

Reeds, C. A., Discussion of oolites by 25, 59 

restoration of Paleozoic cephalot)ods by 25, 136 

— , Fossiliferous conglomerates discussed by 23, 83 

— ; Geologic deposits in relation to Plelst(H»ene man 26, 109 

— ; Graphic projection of Pleistocene climatic oscillations 26, 106 

— ; Mounting of rock and fossil specimens with sulphur 25, 136 

— , New bathymetrical map of the West Indies region 29, 142 

— ; New stratigraphic units of the Hunter formation 22, 92 

— ; Oolites of the Chimney Hill formation, Oklahoma 25, 75 

— , Sediments of Center County, Pennsylvania, discussed by 24, 112 

— ; Stages in the geologic history of Porto Rico 27, 83 

Reef coral fauna of California discussed by C. Schuchert 28, 201 

E. O. Ulrich 28,201 

Carrlzo Creek, Imperial County, California, and its signifi- 
cance ; T. W^. Vaughan 28, 200 

— corals discussed by A. W. Grabau 28, 200 

C. Schuchert 28, 200 

— deposits and the formation of Paleozoic limestones 27, 147 

— encircled Islands, Subsidence of 29, 71,. 489 

Reeside, J. B., cited on Sundance formation 29, 257 

Refbaction, Demonstration of relative 23, 37, 725 



244 J. STANLEY-BROWN INDEX TO VOLUMES 21 TO 30 

Page 

KEFBAtrrivE indices with the microscope, Media of high refraction and 
some standord media of lower refraction, for the determination 

of; H. E. Merwin 24,54,685 

Regelmann, C, Reference to fracture map of southwest Germany of. . 22, 160 

Regional devolatilization of coal ; David White 21, 33. 788 

Regihteb of Fellows and Fellows-elect at Boston-Cambridge meeting 21,40,41 

Albany meeting 28, 1T5, 217 

Baltimore meeting 30, 117, 158 

Berkeley meeting 25, 126 

California meeting 26, 408 

Cordilleran section 24, 98 

Philadelphia meeting 26, 115, 160 

Pittsburgh meeting 22,69,96; 29,155 

I*rinceton meeting 26, 105 

Saint Louis meeting 29, 106 

Seattle meeting of the Cordilleran Section '. 26, 140 

Stanford meeting of Paleontological Society 29, 166 

Washington meeting 23, 53 ; 27, 125, 162 

Regolith, Relations to maximum epirotic deposition of desert 27, 57 

Reid, Clement, cited on origin of pillow lavas 25, 638 

pillow lava 25, 604 

— Pliocene flora 30, 536 

Reid, Eleanor M., cited on Pleistocene flora 30, 536 

Reid, H. F., Acknowledgment to 21, 339 

— ; Additional note on the geojnetry of faults, Paiwr by 21, 737-740 

— , Bannock thrust, southeastern Idaho, discussed by 24, 50 

- -, Beginnings of Lake Agassiz discussed by 24. 71 

— , Chairman Committee on Nomenclature of Faults, Report by 21, 29 

— cited on cause of (great) Alaskan earthquake of September 10, 1899 21,361 

geologic climates 30, 547 

Old Red Sandstone 27,349 

retreat of Muir and adjacent glaciers 21, 368 

Taku glacier 21, 371 

— , Discussion of Glacier Bay topography by 25, 89 

Pleistocene deformation by 28, 165 

rock movement by 28, 126 

the movements of glaciers by 25, 36 

theory of isostacy by 21, 25, 777 

on conditions of the Keewatin by 21, 25 

flow of diabase by 21, 24, 773 

— ; Displacements of triungulation stations in Sumatra due fo an earth- 
quake in 1892 24, 51, 676 

— ; Earthquake sea waves 25, 33 

— , Effect of high pressure on solid substances discussed by 24, 50, 675 

— ; Geometric plans of the earth, with special reference to the planet- 

esimal hypothesis 28, 124 

— , Glacial cirques discussed by 24, 51, 678 

— , Gravity anomalies and geological formations discussed by 23, 50 



REID ^REPORT 245 

Page 

Reid, H. F. ; Nomenclature of faults 22, 54 ; 23. 74 

— ; Note on mountain-producing forces 23, 74 

— ; Preliminary report of Committee on Nomenclature of Faults 23, 50 

— ; Propagation of earthquake waves 22, 54 

— , Remarks on crustal movements In Lake Erie region by 26, 67 

glacial erosion by 26, 73 

— , Report of Committee on Nomenclature of Faults, Chairman 24, 49, 163 

— and Tabeb, S. ; Recent earthquakes of Porto Rico 30, 83 

Reid, Meixabd, cited on heat action - 29, 177 

Reid, S., cited on Richmond boulder trains 21, 747 

Relation of structure to the production of oil and natural gas in the 

mid-Continent field ; C. Y. Gould 28, 158 

■ 

the Holochoanites and the Orthochoanltes to the Protochoanites 

and the significance of the Bactritidfl? ; A. W. Grabau 30, 148 

ReiATiONS of the American pelycosaurs to the South African dinoceph- 

alians ; R. Broom 25, 143 

oil-bearing to the oil-producing formations in the Paleozoic of 

North America ; A. W. Grabau 29, 92 

Reiatioivsuips between the igneous and metamorphic rocks of the Dis- 
trict of Columbia and vicinity ; C. N. Fenner 28. 155 

— of recent and fossil invertebrate fauuas on the west side of the Isth- 

mus of Panama to those on the east side ; Ida S. Oldroyd 29, 162 

the invertebrates to the >ertebrate faunal zones of the Pliocene 

Jacalitos and Etchegoin formations at Conlinga, California ; J. O. 

Nomland 27, 172 

Mesozoic reptiles of North and South America ; S. W. Williston 29, 138 

Relative age of the Detroit River series ; Clinton R. Stauffer 27, 72 

— efllciency of normative and modal classifications of igneous rooks ;' 

E. B. Mathews 30, 01 

Remarkable geologic section near Columbia, Missouri ; E. R. Branson. 28, 170 

— persistence of thin horizons ; G. U. Chadwick 30, 157 

Uknakd, a. F., cited on sea deposits 28, 738 

sedimentation 28, 784 

Renault, B., cited on origin of oil 28, 729 

Report of Auditing Committee 21, 23 ; 22, 62 ; 23, 44 ; 

24, 69 ; 26. 49 ; 26, 87 ; 27, 6() ; 28. 137 ; 29, 83 ; 30, 95 

of Paleontologlcal Society 26,150; 27.155; 28,202; 30,151 

Committee on Formation of Paleontologlcal Soi'l^t^- 21, 16 

Geologic Nomenclature 21,29; 22,52; 24,49; 26,49; 26,57 

Nomenclature of Faults 21,29; 24,49,163 

Photographs 21,19; 23,35; 24,48; 

26, 49 ; 26, 57 ; 29, 69 ; 30, 76 

Publication 21, 17 

of map of Brazil 30, 76 

Council 21, 35 ; 22, 56 ; 23, 38 ; 

24, 21 ; 26, 51 ; 26, 5 ; 27, 5 ; 28, 5 ; 29, 4 ; 30, 4 

of Paleontologlcal Society 23, 77 ; 24, 101 ; 26, 130 ; 

26, 144 ; 27, 142 ; 28, 192 ; 29, 123 ; 30, 144 



246 J. STANLEY-BROWN INDEX TO VOLUMES 21 TO 30 

Pace 

Report of Editor 21.39; 22,60; 23,42; 

24,7; 25,56; 26.10; 27,0; 28,10; 29.9; 30,9 

Geology Committee of the National Research Council by John M. 

Clarke, chairman « 29, 69 

progress in the revision of the lower Eocene faunas ; W. D. Matthew 

25, 144 

Secretary 21,35; 22,56; 23,38; 

24.3; 25,51; 26.5; 27.5; 28,6; 29,5; 30,4 

of Paleontological Society 21, 72 ; 22, 85 ; 23, 78 ; 

24. 101 ; 26, 131 ; 26. 144 ; 27, 142 ; 28. 193 ; 29, 123 ; 30. 144 

Treasurer 21,37; 22,58; 23,40; 24,5; 

25.53; 26.8; 27,7; 28,8; 29,7; 30,7 

of Paleontological Society 22,89; 23,80; 24,103; 

25, 132 ; 26. 145 ; 27, 143 ; 28, 194 ; 29, 125 ; 30, 145 

— on a collection of Oligocene plant fossils from Montana ; O. B. Jen- 

nings 29, 147 

Reptile, New genus of Permian 21, 75, 250-283 

Reptiles from the Permian of New Mexico, A complete skeleton of a 

new group of large 22, 95 

— , Homology of the "Lacrimal" and of the "Alisphenoid" in recent and 

fossil 24, 241-246 

— of the Mesozoic of North and South America 29, 138 

— , Origin of sternum In 27, 152 

— , Prefrontal, lacrimal, and adiacrlmal In 24, 241 

Reptilia, Classification and phylogeny of 28. 216 

Reptilian osteology, Mutability of names in 24, 246 

Research Council, Division of Geologj' and Geography In the 30, 166 

Residual sand type, Description of 21, 630 

Resins in Paleozoic coals ; David White 23. 37. 728 

Resistant surfaces developed by erosion and deposition In the arid and 

semi-arid regions of Arizona ; C. F. Tolman, Jr 25. 125 

Resolution concerning reprinting of United States Geological Survey 

Bulletin on names of geologic formations 24. 49 

— of condolence on death of J. C. Hawver 27, 168 

— regarding the taking of expert testimony 27, 69 

Resolutions cH>ncernlng National Research (Council 28, 123 

Resser, C. E., appointed on Auditing Committee 30, 146 

Restoration of Paleozol« cephalopods : R. Ruedemann 25, 136 

some pyrotherlum mammals ; F. B. Loomls 25, 139 

the world series of elephants and mastodons; H. F. Osborn 25,142, 

407-410 

three Pleistocene skulls from Europe ; J. II. McGregor 28, 215 

Restudy of Ornitholestes 28, 215 

Results of recent work at Rancho La Brea ; J. C. Merrlam 25, 143 

Reunino, E., cited on origin of pillow lavas 25, 638, 653 

structure 25, 636 

pillow structure 25, 598 



REVIEW RHYNCHOTREMA 247 

Paie 
Review of progress in paleontologic research in the Pacific Coast region ; 

J. C. Merriam 28, 223 

the early history of the Society ; H. L. Fairchild 25, 17 

formation of geological societies in the United States; N. H. 

Winchell 25, 27 

Pleistocene species, Paio calif omicus; Loye Home Miller 27, 171 

Revision of the Mississippian formations of the upper Mississippi Val- 
ley ; S. Weller and F. M. Van Tuyl 29, 93 

Paleozoic systems. II ; E. O. Ulrich 21, 31 

pseudotapirs of the North American Eocene ; O. A. Peterson . . 29, 152 

structural classification of petroleum and natural-gas fields; 

F. G. Clapp 28, 158, 553 

Reyeb, E., cited on experimental geology 29, 176 

metamorphism 28, 381 

monoclines 27, 91 

— and Bebtrand. Mabcel, Reference by Suess to advances made in moun- 

tain study by 21, 189 

Reynales limestone 29, 344 

Reynard. Paul, cited on chemical deposition 28, 739 

Reynolds, S. H., cited on pillow l»vas 25, 605, 608 

Rhinoceboses, Notes on Pliocene 29, 153 

Rhipidomella, Location and geologic horizon of si)e('iniens of fossil genus 

21, 298 

— , Measurements and ratio indexes of fossil genus 21, 301-310 

— , Persistence of fluctuating variations as illustrate<l by the fossil 

genus ; Henry S. Williams 21, 76, 296-312 

— , Zones and intervals relating to fossil genus 21, 299-301 

Rhodb Island, Basic rocks of 26, 92 

, Beach cusps at Westquage beach 21, 623 

coal ; Charles W. Brown 21, 31, 783 

, Cumberland-Diamond Hill district of 25, 7o 

, Distribution of nllanite in 28, 469 

, Glacial lake plains in SO, 631 

, Massachusetts Diamond Hill-Cumberland district 25, 435 

, Sand-plains of 30, 626 

Rhombotbypa and other genera, Development of 23, 364 

Rhone Glacier, Reference to decline of 25, 491 

Rhynchonella fringilla-glacialis beds, Anticosti island 21, 710 

— loxia Fischer, Reference to view of Hall and Clarke on 21. 498 

Rhynchonelloid shells, Internal characters of some Mississippian; 

Stuart Weller 21, 76, 498-516 

Hhynchopora beecheri Greger, Description of 21, 515 

— "i cooperenais (Shumard), Figure showing and description of 21, 516 

— hamhurgcnais n. sp., Figure showing and description of 21, 515 

— King, General characteristics of 21, 514 

— perainuata (Winchell) , Description of 21, 515 

— pustuUjm (White), Figure showing and description of 21, 514 

Rhynehotrema perlarnellom beds, Anticosti island 21, (^7 



248 J. STANLEY-BROWN — INDEX TO VOLUMES 21 TO 3O 

Page 

Rhynchotetra caput-testudinia (White), Figure showing and description 

of 21, 507 

— n. gen 21, 506 

Rhyolite, Mineral and chemical composition of 22, 112 

— , Physical structure of 22, 110 

Rhtolites belong to the Pliocene age 22, 108 

— from Yellowstone National Park, Table of analyses of 22, 113 

Rhythms and the measurements of geologic time ; Joseph Barrel 1 28, 745 

— in denudation. 28, 753 

sedimentation 28, 776 

Ricco, A., cited on Stromboli , 28, 255, 256, 257, 270, 274 

Rice, William North, Address at Dana centenary : Dana, the man 24, 56 

— cited on allanite 28, 469 

Connecticut geology 28, 861 

— , Climatic investigations on geological theories discussed by 24, 70, 687 

— , Discussion of submergence of Connecticut and Hudson valley 25, 64 

Rich, J. L., cited on Catskill glaciation 28, 549 

local moraines in the Adirondacks 27, 651 

oil fields of Illinois 28, 660 

— ; Dating of peneplains : an old erosion surface in Idaho, Montana, and 

Washington— is it Eocene? 29, 89 

— , Discussion of evidence of recent subsidence on the coast of Maine by 26, 91 

local glaciers in Vermont by 28, 135 

loess by 29, 73 

Pleistocene deposits by 29, 78 

on anticlines of Chagrin shales by 21, 773 

— ; Divergent ice-flow on the plateau northeast of the Catskill Mountains 

as revealed by ice-molded topography 25, 68 

— ; Local glaciation in the Catskill Mountains 28, 133 

— , Monks Moimd discussed by 26, 75 

— , Remarks on banded clays by 27, 114 

rectilinear features of Catskills by 27, 107 

— ; Some peculiarities of glacial erosion near the margin of the conti- 
nental glacier in central Illinois 26, 70 

RicHABDS, R. W^., and Mansfield, G. R. ; Bannock thrust, a major fault 

in southeastern Idaho 24, 50, 675 

; structural features of southeastern Idaho 24, 50, 675 

RicHABDS, T. W., cited on atomic weight of lead 28, 849 

— and Lambert, M. E., cited on comparative atomic weight determina- 

tions of lead 26, 192 

Richardson, C, cited on origin of oil 28, 734 

RiciiABDBON, G. B., cited on Coal Measure sections 30, 586 

— ; Monument Creek group and its relations to the Denver and Arapahoe 

formations 23, 36, 267-276 

— ; Notes on the upper Carboniferous in southeast New Mexico and west 

Texas 21, 76 

Richardson, James, cited on non-glaciation of Magdalen Islands 25,84 

sections of Anticostl and Midgan islands 2I, 678 



RICHARDSON GRIGGS 249 

Page 

RicHABDSON, James, dted on thickness of Antlcosti strata 21, 694 

— , Reference to fossils of Antlcosti and Mlngan Islands collected by . . . 21, 678 

sectional divisions of the Antlcosti series made by 21, 678, 605, 

697, 701, 705, 708, 713, 715 
study of Antlcosti and Mlngan Islands of 21, 678 

— and liOGAN, Sib W. B., Depth of strata between Mlngan and Antlcosti 

Islands estimated by 21, 682 

Richmond and Great Barrlngton boulder trains ; F. B. Taylor 21, 747-752 

— boulder train, Extent of 21, 748 

trains, Location and characteristics of 21, 747-749 

, Previous investigators of 21, 747 

— formations of the provinces of Ontario and Quebec in Canada ; A. F. 

Foerste 24, 110 

— train and distribution of Great Barrlngton boulders. Map showing. 21,748 
RicHMONDiAN age. Beneath the base of the Antlcosti series strata of 

probable early 21, 682, 693 

— beds, Antlcosti Island early 21, 696 

— formation 26, 286 

— series, Antlcosti Island 21, 694 

RicHTHOF£N, Fehdinand VON, clted ou hoIlow spherulltes in Hungarian 

rhyolites 26, 256 

monoclines 27, 91 

— , Reference to work of 28, 738 

RiDEWOOD, , cited on eplotic 28, 983 

RiEBECKiTE-iEGEBiTE granite. Analysis of 2S, 466 

of Diamond Hill-Cumberland district 26, 463 

— bearing granite porphyry 26, 467 

RiES, H., acted as secretary for Group C, Third Section 26, 43 

— cited on allanlte 28, 470 

: dolomites and limestones 28, 437 

glacial lakes of Elizabethtown group 27, 664, 666 

metamorphism 28, 386 

Pleistocene clays 28, 282, 289, 306 

— elected on Auditing Committee 21, 2 

— ; High-grade clays of the United States 30, 95 

— ; Memorial of Theodore Bryant Comstock 27, 12 

— , Recent changes in the Asulkan glacier 24, 71, 696 

RiFT-MouNTAiN, Type of rifted relict mountain, or ; J. M. Clarke 26, 90 

Rift Valley, British East Africa 28, 312 

RiGOS, E. S., cited on Brachlosaurus 26, 329 

Camarasaurus . . . . , 30, 386 

deltas in the Morrison formation 26, 320 

largest known dinosaur 26, 153 

origin of Morrison formation 26, 318 

Uinta group 26, 418 

— ; Group of twenty-six associated skeletons of Leptomeryx from the 

White River Oligocene 26, 145 

— ; Notes and slides of the Uinta Basin Eocene 23, 88 



250 J. STANLEY-BROWN INDEX TO VOLUMES 21 TO 30 

Rio de Janeiro, Geology of 30, 299 

Rio Grande, High-level plains of, Figure showing 21, 579 

. Relationship of valley terraces of, Figure showing 21, 579 

do Norte, Geology of 30, 304 

Sul, Geology of 30, 306 

Valley at Socorro, Profile of 21, 578 

— Jacar^ and Rio Verde valleys, Bahia, Limestones of 22, 196 

Rippu:-MARK phenomena 28, 913 

Ripple-marks, Study of 27, 109 

RiTTER, , cited on age of the earth 28, 901 

measurement of geologic time 28, 749 

Ritter, H. p.. Acknowledgment to 21, 339 

River heds. Alberta Belly, and Montana Judith, of Dog Creek and Cow 

Island, equivalent to. 26, 149 

— channels of limestone region of Bahia, Size and character of aban- 

doned 22, 197 

— deposits of North America, Alluvial fan, etcetera 24, 400-406 

— , Diversion of the Montreal 21, 21, 762 

— waters, Materials in solution in 26, 224 

ROBBINS, W. W., cited on climatic changes 25, 548 

Robertson, W. F. ; Memorial of William Johnson Sutton 27, 35 

Robinson, F. C, cited on allanite 28, 468 

Robinson, H. H. ; A new erosion cycle in the Grand Canyon district. . 21, 793 

Robinson, W. I., cited on Limestone Mountain 27, 94, 99 

Rochester section 26, 304 

RocK-BORiNG animals 28, 965 

shells. Preliminary inquiry into the geological significance of; Al- 
bert L. Barrow 24, 130 

— decay. Climatic effect on 21, 570 

— detritus in high mountain regions, Trend and arrangement of 21, 673 

G. H. Chadwick. 28, 125 

— movement discussed by R. T. Chamberlin 28, 126 

H. F. Reid - • 28, 126 

C. Schuchert 28, 126 

E. W. Shaw 28, 125 

— of Stark Knob, Age of igneous 24, 349 

— products and the war ; G. F. Loughlin SO, 97 

— slide in Wind River Mountains 28, 149 

— stre£^ and glacial action, Conclusions ou 21, 672 

(north), Veta peak, Character of the materials of 2I, 667 

, Description of 21, 666 

, Details of structure 21, 670 

, General characteristics of 21, 666 

, North branch of 21, 670 

, Size and elevation of 21, 668 

, South branch of 21, 671 

, Surface features of 21, 668 

, Whitman Cross and Ernest Howe, first used as a geologic term. . 21, 663 



ROCK ROGBRS 251 

Page 

Rock streams, Definition and previous descriptions of 21, 663-665 

, DiflPerenee between talus slopes and landslides and 21, 664 

, Glacial action unnecessary to development 21, 664 

of San Juan Mountains, Reference to 21, 664 

Veta peak, Colorado ; Horace B. Patton 21, 26, 663-676, 764 

— terraces in the driftless area of Wisconsin ; Lawrence Martin 28, 148 

— weathering in desert regions 21, 569 

RocKFORT, Massachusetts, Fayalite in granite of 21, 33, 787 

RocKS, Complex of alkaline igneous 21, 32, 785 

— from middle western Virginia, Chemical analyses of igneous dike. . . 24, 331 

— in central western Virginia, Petrology of igneous 24, 309 

— of northeastern Illinois and eastern Wisconsin, Alexandrian 26,95, 155 

Rhode Island, Basic 29, 95 

— , Origin of the alkaline 21, 32, 87-118 

Rocky Mountain front and Great Plains provinces. Physiographic study 

of the Cretaceous-Eocene period in the 26, 105 

oil fields ; F. A. Basher 28, 157 

phosphate deposits. Origin of the 26, 100 

region, Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary on the 25, 325 

section In the vicinity of Whitemans Pass ; C. W. Drysdale and L. D. 

Burling 29, 145 

— Mountains in Colorado and New Mexico, Relation of Oetaceous for- 

mations to the ', 26, 114, 156 

Roddy, H. J., cited on lime concretions in streams 27, 361 

— , Reference to "Concretions in streams formed bj' the agency of blue- 
green algie and related plants by 27, 361 

RoDENTiA ; W. D. Matthew 23, 184 

Rodents, Af tonian mammalian fauna 22, 215 

— of Rancho La Brea ; L, R. Dice 26, 167 

Rodeo Pleistocene, Fauna of 27, 169 

RoEMER, F., Geological work in Texas of 25, 164 

RoGEBS, A. F., Discussion of Nevada stibnite by 25, 126 

papers bearing on ore deposition by 26, 403 

on f anglomerate by 23, 72 

— ; Gypsum and anhydrite from the Ludwig mine, Lyon County, Maine 24, 94 

— introduced by C. F. Tolman, Jr 26, 395 

— , Iron-ore deposit at Barth, Nevada, discussed by 24, 97 

— , Magmatic sulflds 28, 132 

— ; Nomenclature of minerals 25, 124 

— ; Orthoclase as a vein mineral 23, 72 

— ; Paragenesis of minerals 21, 792 

— , Reference to war work of 30, 184 

— ; Sericite, a low temperature hydrothermal mineral 26, 395 

— ; Validity of the law^ of ratitmal indices of crystal faces 24, 93 

— and Boundey, E. S. ; Occurrence of free gold in granodiorite of Siski- 

you County, California 25, 124 

RooEBS, A. W., cited on Carboniferous conglomerate of Africa 25, 201 

RooEBS, G. S., cited on origin of oil 28, 729 



252 J. STANLEY-BROWN INDEX TO VOLUMES 21 TO 30 

Page 

R00EB8, H. D., cited on monoclines 27f 90-92 

New England submergence 30, 598 

Pennsylyania Precambiian 29, 376 

Richmond boulder trains 21, 747 

sandstone in South Africa 27, 181 

Silurian formations in New Jersey and Pennsylvania 27, 545-547, 

550,553 

term monocline 28, 569 

RoGEBS, W. B., cited on monoclinals 27, 90-92 

syenites 27, 196 

term monocline 28, 569 

— , Reference to "Geology of the Virginias" 27, 196 

RoHN, OscAB, cited on the Nlzina limestone of Alaska 27, 693 

— , Reference to "A reconnaissance of the Ghitina River and the Skolai 

Mountains, Alaska," of , . . . 27, 693 

observations of Alaskan earthquakes 21, 345 

RoMAiNE formation, Divisions of 21, 686-688 

, Fossils found in 21, 687, 688 

, Location and thickness of 21, 686, 688 

, Mlngan Islands, Beekmantown called 21, 686 

, Oldest Paleozoic strata of Mingan region 21, 688 

— island section, Observations in 21, 686, 687 

Roots in the underclayd of coal ; David White 24, 76. 114, 719 

RosK, GusTAV, Analysis of the lithophysse from Cerro de las Navnjas by 

26,259 

— cited on Keweenaw series 27, OH 

RosEBUBO quadrangle, Oregon, Siphonalia auitei-enHi^ zone. Fauna of the 

26,169 

RosENBUBCH, H., cltcd In discussion of alkaline rocks. . ! 21, 88 

on metamorphism 28, 383 

— , Reference to celebration of seventieth birthday of 21, 117 

his "Mikroskopische Physiographie der Massigen Gestelne" 21,91 

work of 28, 736 

Ross, O. 0. D., cited on solfataric gas hypothesis 28, 728 

Roth, Justus, cited on experimental geology 29, 182 

Roth, Santiago, cited on dinosaurs 26, 401 

RoTHPLETZ, August, cited on Investigations in Norway 27, 159 

limestone in MjSsen region 27, 571-573 

organic deposits 28, 740 

of oolites 25, 749, 753, 754 

: pillow lavas 25, 637 

pillow structure 25, 596-597 

— quoted on oolitic sand of Great Salt I^ake, Utah ^ 2I, 645, 646 

Salitre limestones of Bahia 22, 190 

RouMANiA. Oil fields of 28, 563 

— , Petroleum supply of 28, 613 

RouNDY, P. v., and Mansfield, Geoboe R. ; Stratigraphy of some forma- 
tions hitherto called Beckwith and Bear River, in southeastern 
Idaho 27, 70 



ROWE ^RXrSSBLL 253 

Page 

RowE, J. P., cited on barite selenite from Montana 25, 70 

RoYCE, W. A., Analysis of Pennsylvania oolitic limestone by 25, 758 

RrcKMAN, John H. ; Evidence indicating an unconformity at the base 

of the Tamiosoma Zone In the Goalinga oil fields, California 24, 132 

— ; Fauna and relations of the white shales of the Coallnga district. . . 26, 168 
— : Relations of the Santa Margarita formation in the Coalingu east 

side field 26, 166 

RuEDEMANN, RuDOLPH ; An alternative explanation of the origin of the 

Saratoga mineral waters 25, 38 

— cit^ on allanlte 28, 470 

eurypterids in the Shawangimk 27, 533 

graptolite shales 28, 959-9eo 

Normanskill fauna 27, 577 

Shawangunk correlated with Pittsford shale 27, 534-535 

Silurian formations in New York 27, 644 

— , The Dictyonemas of New Brunswick discussed by 28, 83 

— , Discussion of Alaska Paleozoic section by 25, 137 

new paleogeographic maps by 25, 136 

— , Fossiliferous conglomerates discussed by 28, 83 

— ; Frankfort and Utica shales of the Mohawk Valley 22, 63, 720 

— ; Graptolite zones of the Utica shales , 28, 206 

— ; Paleontology of arrested evolution 28, 705 

— ; Presence of median eye in trilobites 27, 146 

— presided at opening session of Paleontological Society 28, 192 

— , Quotation on Potsdam formation from 27, 650 

— , Remarks on Guelph formation by 27, 148 

marine faunas by 27. 160 

"mutations" by » 27, 148 

— , Report on Alaskan graptolites by 25, 194 

— ; Restoration of Paleozoic cephalopoda 25, 136 

— , Sediments of Center County, Pennsylvania, discussed by 24, 112 

— , Session of Paleontological Society, December 31, 1912, presided over 

by Vice-President 24, 108 

— ; The stratigraphic significance of graptolites 22, 93, 231 

— , "Types of inliers observed in New York," Reference to 21, 332 

— and CI4ABKE, John M. ; Mode of life of the Eurypterlda 21, 76 

Eastman, Charles R. ; Anatomy and physiology in extinct organ- 
isms 21, 74 

RurriN, E., Geological work of 25, 168 

— , State Geologist of South Carolina 25, 160 

Rules of the Society 21, 49-62 

Russell, G. S., cited on earthquake sea waves 25, 34 

Russell, I. C, cited on Albert Lake terraces 25, 660 

bitumen of New Jersey 25, 627 

chemical deposition 28, 739 

"Concentration as a geological principle" 21, 648 

dunes in the Carson desert of Nevada 21, 647 

faults in Yakutat region 21, 344 



254 J. STANLEY-BROWN INDEX TO VOLUMES 21* TO 30 

Page 

UussELL, I. C, cited on forma tiou of the Newark sorstem (Jura-Trias) 

of Appalachian region 21« 632 

his monograph on Lake Lahontau 21, 648 

intermont plains of the Great Basin region 21, 581 

— Mono Basin terraces 26, 562 

New Jersey trap sheet 25, 623 

origin of pillow lavas 25,637,640,642 

pillow lava 25, 617 

red color of the Triassic 28, 760 

rock decay 21, 570 

subaerial decay of rocks 21, 630 

the basin ranges 21, 548 

volcanoes of North America 21, 629 

— ; Geological history of Lake I^hontan, Reference to 22, 153 

— ; Monograph XI, United States Geological Survey, 1885, Reference to 22, 165 

— quoted on "rock decay" • 23, 539 

Russia, Oil fields of 28, 563, 565 

— , Petroleum supply of 28, 613 

— , Reference to climatic chanj^es in 25, 482 

RuTHEBFORD, SiB Ebnest, cltcd ou structurc of atoms 26, 190 

radioactivity 28, 843 

radio-thermal action 28, 903 

RuTiLE-BEABiNG rocks, Pctrology of 29, 100 

RuTOT, A. L., cited on the Montien of Belgium 25, 394 

— , Reference to work of 28, 738 

Rydeb, John, Reconstruction of Camarasaurus by SO, 380 

s 

Sacandaga River (New York) 22, 184 

Sacbum of Camarasaurus 27, 151 

Sadebba Mas6, Miguel, cited on Philippine geology' 28, 528 

Sabnstbom, G., Analyses by 27, 207 

Saffobd, J. M., Comment on Troost's reports by 25, 161 

— , Geological work in Tennessee of 25, 167 

— , Work on cotton reports of 25, 176 

Sagabd, G., cited on oil sewage in New York 28, 620 

Saginaw Basin, Relation to uplift of glacial lakes of 29, 75 

Sahaba and other deserts, Character of sand of 21, 639 

Saint Cboix, Geology of 29, 620 

— Ellas range, Alaska, Height of 21, 343 

— Lawrence basin. Changes of altitude of the 29, 214 

, Limitations of Precambrian nomenclature in 29, 90 

, Ordovlcic-Siluric section of the Mingan and Antlcosti islands. Gulf 

of 21, 677-716 

River, Scour of 27. 79 

, Twenty-foot terrace and sea-cliff of the lower; James Walter 

Goldthwait 22, 64, 723 



SAINT SALTON 255 

Page 
Saint La wren ck Valley and the I^ke region, Post-Glaolal earth move- 
ments in 24, 74 

, New York, Post-Ordovician deformation in the 26.115.287-294 

— rx»ui8 limestone, Brecciatlon in 27, 122 

meeting, Register of 29, 106 

— Paul, Minnesota, Section at 25, 267 

— Peter sandstone, C. P. Berkey quoted on origin of 23, 437 

— Vincent island. Ash and sand derived from La Soufriere and Walllibu 

and Rabaka rivers, 1902, in 21, 637 

Salfield, H., cited on Peruvian fossils 29. 611 

Saijent features of the geology of the Cascades of Oregon, with some 
correlations between the east coast of Asia and the west coast of 

America ; W. du P. Smith 29, 81 

Salina beds of Pennsylvania and New York 24, 488 

Saune fumerole deposits of the South Italian volcanoes ; Henry S. Wash- 
ington 27, 61 

— water and mud. Separation of salt from 29, 80 

Sausbuby, R. D., cited on Delaware terraces 25, 86 

duration of Glacial period 28, 812 

Olacial geology of yew Jersey 27, 253 

Low^er Ordovicic formations 27, 557 

metamorphism 28, 383 

New Jersey Pleistocene 28, 283, 287, 303, 306 

uplift 27,239 

Pennsylvania peneplains 29, 578 

— , Discussion of earth-movement in Minnesota by 25, 35 

intraformational corrugation 25, 37 

Ontario glaciation by 25, 72 

Red Beds by 25,82 

— elected Second Vice-President 24, 9 

— ; Glacial work in the western mountains in 1901, Reference to 23, 706 

— , Introduction of J. H. Bretz by 28, 170 

— , Meeting of the First Section called to order by 25, 65 

— , Paleozoic glaciation discussed by 25, 31 

— , Reference to war work of 30, 180 

— , Remarks on Pleistocene uplift by 27, 239 

Salitbe Valley, Bahia, Catinga limestones of 22, 191 

Salomon, Wilhelm, quoted on hydrographic system of the Alps and the 

Tyrol 22, 161 

Salt beds of Seneca Lake 23, 481 

— deposits, Eurypterids and the Shawangunk conglomerates 24, 494 

, Origin of 24, 490 

— from saline water and mud ^ 29, 471 

— marsh formation near Boston and its geological significance ; Charles 

A. Davis 21, 29, 766 

— , Separation from saline water and mud of 29, 80 

— water of the Mexican oil fields 24, 270 

Salton Sea, Interesting changes in the composition of the ; A. E. Vinson 

26,402 



256 J. STANLEY-BROWN — INDEX TO VOLUMES 21 TO 30 

Past 

Salts of silver, Occurrence of balogen 21, 791 

Sampaio, Azevedo, cited on size of ant colonies 21, 455 

Sampaio, Theodobe F., Age of Catlnga limestone of Bahla. . . « 22, 198 

Samuelson, G., cited on organic deposits 28, 740 

San Andreas ridge, New Mexico, Erosional processes In an arid region 

typified by. . .' 21, 561 

San Diego County, Fauna of the Tejon in 27, 173 

Sand and dust storms of arid regions. Occurrence and character of . . . 21, 584 

Sand-blast, Corraslve efficiency of natural ; Charles Keyes 26, 63 

Sand-ghbome deposits of Maryland ; J. T. Singewald, Jr 30, 111 

— dunes, Character of 21, 640 

— erosloB from studies in the Libyan desert. Range and rhythmic action 

of; William H. Hobbs * 26, 63 

— grains, Classification of 21, 626, 627 

, Criteria for the recognition of various types of ; W. H. Sherzer. . 21,25, 

625-660 

, Difference between aqueo-residual and vf^Hduo-aqueos 21, 627 

, Explanation of plates showing types of 21, 657-660 

, Thesis stated of criteria for the recognition of the various types of 

21, 625, 626 
, Typical assemblages reveal geological history of 21, 625 

— (gray) of Escambia County, Florida •. 21, 635 

Sahara and other deserts, Character of 21, 639 

— type. Concentration 21, 647 

, Glacial 21, 628 

, Organic 21, 643-647 

, Residual 21, 630 

, Volcanic 21, 629 

— types, Aqueous 21, 632-638 

, Composition of organic 21, 644 

, Eollan 21, 638-643 

Sandia range, Geologic cross-section of the, Figure showing 21, 566 

Sands, Arabian Desert red 21, 643 

— , Beach, dune, and desert 21, 640 

— containing magnetite, Mechanical analysis of 25, 727 

— , Problem of the Texas Tertiary 26, 447 

Sandstone at the State prison near Carson City, Nevada, Origin of the. 23, 73 

— beds, Absence of water In dry 29, 105 

— , Extent of Berea 26, 209 

— In Ohio, Berea 26,96,155,205-216 

— of the San Jos^ and Mount Hamilton quadrangles, Thickness of 24, 96 

— , Principle of recognition of sand grains applied to Sylvanla 2I, 650 

— , Wind-blown ...» 24, 112 

Sandstones of the delta deposits of North America, Bays, Clinch, Long- 
wood, and Keefer 24, 446-482 

— in deltas, Stratification of 23, 427 

— of Ontario, Orlskany 23, 83, 371-375 

southeastern Minnesota, Red 21, 30 



SAN ^SAUROPOD 257 

Page 

San Joaquin Valley, Geology of the 25, 123 

San Josfi and Mount Hamilton quadrangles, General geology of 24, 96 

; California, Traohytic perlite from Lone Hill, near 24, 94 

San Juan district of Colorado, Physiographic studies in the ; Wallace W. 

Atwood 22, 66, 735 

Mountains of Colorado, Glacial epochs in 23, 46, 732 

, Reference to rock streams of 21, 664 

since close of Mesozoic era. History of 27, 38 

San I^renzo formation of California 29, 299 

Oligocene 25, 153 

San PABiiO, Echinoderms of the 25, 152 

formation on the north side of Mount Diablo, California ; Bruce L. 

Clark 24, 130 

series, Fauna of the 25, 152 

Sangbe de Christo divide, Colorado, Reference to 21, 666 

Santa Ana Mountains, Cretaceous faunas of the 26, 169 

, Fauna in the Cretaceous of 27, 174 

Santa Catalina Mountains, Arizona, Bajadas of the 26, 391 

Santa Catharina, Geology of 30, 313 

Santa Cruz, California, Natural bridge at 21, 326-327 

Santa Margarita forma tibn in the Coalinga east side field. Relations of 

the ; J. H. Ruckman 26, 166 

Santa Monica Mountains, Vaqueros of the 25, 153 

Santa Ynez River district, Santa Barbara County, California, Geology 

of a portion of the ; W. S. W. Kew '. 26, 401 

Santos, J. R., Analyses of allanite by 28, 486 

Sao Paulo, Geology of 30, 316 

Safonite, tbalite, greenalite, and greenstone; N. H. Winchell.. 23,51,329-331 

Sapper, Carl, cited on Honduras fossils 29, 608 

Sapropelic hypothesis. Microscopic study of certain coals in relation to 

the ; E. C. Jeffreys 21, 33, 788 

of the origin of coal, Inadequacy of the ; Edw. C. Jeffrey 24, 73, 706 

Saratoga oil field, Barite from 25, 77 

Saratoga- Schenectady-Glens Falls section. Pleistocene features of . . . 27, 65 

Saratoga Springs, Exposure of the fault escarpment at 25, 38 

, Origin of mineral waters of 25, 38 

Sardeson, F. W. ; Characteristics of a corrosion conglomerate 25, 39, 265 

Sargent, H. C, cited on metamorphism 28, 413 

Sarle, C. J., cited on fossils from Irondequoit limestone 29, 352 

— , Discussion of classification of aqueous habitats by 26, 158 

Shawangunk formation of Medina age of 26, 150 

Saskatchewan gravel, Dawson and McConnell 24, 550, 558 

Satsop formation of Washington and Oregon ; J. H. Bretz 28, 170 

Saunders, E. J. ; Relation between the Tertiary sedimentaries and lavas 

In Kittitas County, Washington 26, 137 

Sauquoit beds 29, 341 

Saurofod dinosaurs, Heads and tails; a few notes relating to 26, 153 

, Structure of the 21, 74 

XVII — Boll, Geol. Soc. Am. 



258 J. STANLEY-BROWN INDEX TO VOLUMES 21 TO 30 

Page 

Saubopoda and Stegosauria, Geographic and geologic distribution of.. 26,326 

of Europe 26, 332 

the Morrison compared with those of South America, England, 

and eastern Africa ; R. L. Lull 26, 90, 151. 323-334 

— of the Morrison, 300 titles on the 26. 290 

— ; K. S. Lull 23, 209 

— , Restoration of ('ope*s 30. 151 

Sauropods, Deteniiinatiou of species in 27, 151 

— of Cope, Camarasaurus, Amphicoelias, and other 30, 379 

Saussure, H. B. de, cited on structure of Alps 29, 175 

Savage, T. E. ; Alexandrian rocks of northeaFtern Illinois and eastern 

Wisconsin 26, 95, 155 ; 27, 305 

series in Missouri and Illinois — stratigraphy and paleontologj' ; 

Part I : 24, 111 

— cited on Chemuung fauna 30, 465 

"Silurian of Hudson Bay region 30, 367 

— , Devonian of central .Missouri discussed by 26, 112 

— ; Fauna of the Girardeau limestone and of the Edgewood formation. 21,76 
— ; Geology of the area of Paleozoic in the vicinity of Hudson and James 

bays, Canada 28, 171 

— ; New points in Ordovician and Silurian paleogeography 29, 88 

— quoted on natural bridges in Jackson County, Iowa 21, 332 

— ; Tentative correlation of the Pennsylvania strata in the eastern in- 
terior, western interior, and Appalachian regions by their marine 
faunas 29. 97 

— , Francis M. Van Tuyl introduced by 27, 122 

— and Van Tuyl, F. M. ; Geology and stratigraphy of the area of Paleo- 

zoic rocks in the vicinity of Hudson and James bays 30, 339 

Saving the silts of the Mississippi River ; Wallace W. Atwood and Rod- 
erick Peattie 28, 149 

Sawyer, , cited on Maine marine clay 28, 315 

Saxony, Pillow lavas in 25, 595 

Sayles, Robert W. ; Banded glacial slates of Permocarboniferous age, 

showing possible seasonal variations in deposition 27, 110 

— cited on tillites near Boston 27, 185 

— ; Microscopic structural features of the banded glacial slate of Permo- 

Carboniferous age at Squantum, Massachusetts 28, 152 

Saylorsburg, White clays at 30, 96 

Scale of hardness ( dark) ; Alfred C. Lane 23, 37, 725 

Scaled amphibia of the Coal Measures ; R. L. Moodie 26, 154 

Scallops and meanders ; N. S. W. Jefferson 21, 26 

Scania, Ordovicic of 27, 611 

ScAPuix>-coRAcoiD in reptiles and mammals. Homologies of the borders 

and surfaces of the 28, 216 

ScARBORO Heights, Canada, Correlation Whirlpool drift with 21, 438 

, Interglacial beds of 21,435,438,439 

ScHARDT, H., cited on experimental geology 29, 176 

ScHAUBERT, C, Remarks on "mutations" by 27, 148 



SCHAUBERT ^SCHUCHERT 259 

t 

Page 

ScHAUBEBT, C, Reuiarks on reef deposits by 27, 147 

Schenectady- Sabatoga-Glens Falls section, Pleistocene features of . . . 27,65 

ScHEBZEB, W. H., cited on ice work in southeastern Michigan 26, 70 

origin of oolites 25, 753 

ScHiLLEB, F. (\ S., cited on radioactive transformations 26, 194 

Schist, Occurrence of chlorltic or ampliiholite 21, 747, 751 

Schley, Go\t5bnob, Recommendation for Georgia Geological Survey by 25, 173 

ScHLOEsmc, , cited on geologic climates 30, 557 

ScHLUNDT, HEBNfAN, and MooBE, R. B., quoted on the radioactivity of 

thermal waters of the Yellowstone National Park 22, 121 

SCHMAIJ5, K., cited on anatomy of horse and tapir 25, 406 

ScHMELCK, v.. Analyses by 27, 207 

Schmidt, C. W., cited on metamorphism 28, 402 

Schmidt, Fr., cited on Esthonia studies 27, 590 

— , Reference to "Glaukonitkalk" by 27, 596 

Schneider, E. A., Analyses by 27, 233, 640 

ScuNEiDEB, Hyrum ; Gcologic age of the Coal Creek batholith and its 
bearing on some other features of the geology of the Colorado 
Front Range 26, 398 

— introduced by H. B. Patton 26, 398 

ScHOEPF, J. D., Coastal Plain investigations by 25, 158 

ScHOFiELD, S. J., cited on belt terrane of British Columbia 25, 189 

Schott, Abthub, Geological work in Texas of 25, 165 

Schott, G., cited on sea sediments 28, 739 

SCHBADEB, F. C, Reference to observations of Alaskan earthquakes. . . 21,345 
"The geology and mineral resources of a portion of the Copper 

River district, Alaska," of 27, 693 

— and Spenceb, A. C, cited on the Nazina limestone of Alaska 27, 693 

ScHBCEPPEL shale 29, 350 

ScHUCiiEBT, Chables, Acknowledgments to 27, 310 ; 29, 330 

— - ; Age of the American Morrison and East African Tendaguru forma- 
tions 28, 203 ; 29, 245 

— ; Alpheus Hyatt and his principles of research discussed by 24, 105 

— ; Biologic principles of paleogeography 21, 73 

— ; The Cataract : A new formation at the base of the Slluric in Ontario 

and New York 24, 107 

— ; Chart of glaciatlon and land distribution 25, 586 

— cited on Cambrian brachiopoda 25, 421 

Classification of geologic records 27, 524 

"Climates of geologic time" 27, 185 

Clinton basal shale 29, 331 

coral fauna 27, 478-479 

correlation of the Medina with other formations 25, 292 

discontinuity of Paleozoic water bodies 28, 819 

genus Clorinda 27, 311 

geologic climates 30, 509 

Gun formation of Anticosti Island 27, 312 

Jurassic climate 30, 520 



260 J. STANLEY-BROWN INDEX TO VOLUMES 21 TO 30 

8CUUCHEBT, Charles, cited on Martville and Bear Creek faunas 29. 342 

Medina and Cataract formations of the Siluric of New York and 

Ontario 27,313 

: — Medinan deposits in New York and Pennsylvania 27, 464 

metamorphism 28, 385 

Mexican stratigraphy 29, 601 

Morrison formation 30. 381 

Old Red Sandstone 27,352 

Ordovidan of Froblsher Bay 30, 343 

rocks 27, 560 

I)aleogeographical map 27, 384 

paleogeography of North America 28, T70 

reference to paleogeographic map by 25. 353 

Silurian formations in Maryland and West Virginia 27, 553 

Supai fauna • SO, 492 

shales 30. 491 

the Cretaceous sea 25, 335 

Edgewood formation of Illinois and Missouri 21, 708 

Ix)wville beds 28, 806 

Ordovicic of Ellis Bay formation 21,704 

volcanic hypothesis of climatic changes 25, 544 

— , Conference on the criteria in Paleogeography proposed by 22, 88, 217 

— ; Correlation and chronology in geology on the basis of paleogeography 

26, 411 ; 27, 491 

— , ( 'Ubau fossil mammals discussed by 24, 109 

— , Devonian of central Missouri discussed by 26, 112 

— , "Diastrophic action is at the basis of chronogenesis," Quotation from 

26,306 

— ; Discussion of Alaska Paleozoic section by 25, 137 

algal and bacterial deposits in the Algonkian Mountains of Mon- 
tana by 26, 148 

classification of aqueous habitats by 26. 158 

Colorado glaciation by 25, 32 

corrosion conglomerate by 25, 39 

geological reconnaissance in Porto Rico by 26, 114 

new paleogeographic maps by 25, 136 

paleontologic criteria in time relations by 26. 411 

Paleozoic faunas by 25, 135 

stratigraphy about Three Forks, Montana, by 26, 157 

reef-coral fauna of California by i 28, 200-201 

rock movement by 28, 126 

symposium papers by 25, 130 

Tennessee shale by 28, 207 

the paleontology of arrested evolution by 28, 205 

Triassic faunas by 26, 412 

on Permian floras in the western "red beds" 2I, 75 

the symposium "Correlation of the Cretaceous*' by 26, 414 

— elected First Vice-President 21, 2 



8CHUCHERT SCOTT 261 

Pag« 

ScHUCHEBT, Chables, elected President Paleontolo^cal Society, 1910.. 21,72 

— ; The Labrador-Newfoundland Paleozoic section 22, 96 

— ; Medina and Cataract formations of the Slluric of New Yorlc and 

Ontario 26, 277 

— , Ozarkian and Canadian systems discussed by 24, 51 

— ; Paleogeographic and geologic significance of recent bracbiopoda 22, 93, 258 

— , Paper of R. S. Lull on "Terrestrial Triassic forms" read by 26, 413 

— , Preliminary meeting for the organization of a paleontological society 

called to order by 21, 09 

— quoted in a review of Hennig's work "Am Tendaguru" 26, 328 

on the Brassfleld (Ohio Clinton) limestone 24, 352 

=- marine Triassic of California, Oregon, Nevada, Idaho, and 

eastern Wyoming 26, 218 

— , Reference to annelid burrow by k 27, 536 

paleogeographic maps by 28, 837 

"Synopsis of American fossil Bracbiopoda" of 21, 498 

— ; Shawangunk formation of Medina age 26, 150 

— , Shinarump conglomerate discussed by 24, 52 

— ; Silurian formations of southeastern New York, New Jersey, and 

Pennsylvania 27, 531 

— ; Subdivisions of the Ordovieian and Cambrian 28, 882, 883 

— ; Synopsis of American Bracbiopoda, Reference to 22, 258 

— ; Text-book of geology 28, 782 

— , Thanks rendered to 27, 387 

— and TwENHOFEL, W. H., cited on Ordovicic- Slluric section 27, 312 

; Ordovicic- Slluric section of the Mingan and Auticostl islands.. 

21, 75, 677-716 

ScHucHEBT's map of the Salina Sea, Reference to 26, 238 

ScHWENKEL, H., clted on metamorphism 28, 402 

Sciences, Classification of the : 23, 97 

Scope and significance of paleoecology ; F, E. Clements 29, 369 

ScoBPiONs and spiders — Paleozoic Arachnida 24, 106 

Scotland, Lower Ordovicic deposits in 27, 560 

— , Pillow lava in 25, 606 

Scott, R. F., cited on ice-flowers 29, 475 

Scott, W. B., African mammals discussed by 23, 85 

— cited on metamorphism 28, 384 

"monoclinal flexure" 28,568 

the horizons of the Morrison 26, 300 

— , Discussion of Pyrotherium fauna by 25, 140 

mammals 25, 139 

titanotheres by * 25, 139 

— , Marine mammals discussed by 23, 85 

— , Mesozoic and Cenozoic fishes discussed by 23, 86 

— , Paleontological Society called to order by President 23, 84 

— , Paleozoic fishes discussed by 23, 86 

— ; Permanency of the continents and oceans 24, 106 

— , Pre-Cretaceous Dinosaurs discussed by 23, 85 



262 J. STANLEY-BROWN INDEX TO VOLUMES 21 TO 30 

Pace 

Scott, W. B., Primates, Marsupials, and Inseetivores discussed by 23, 86 

— , Pyrotherium beds of Patagonia discussed by 24, 52, 107 

— , Reference to address by 25* 5 

— , Remarks on Diplodocus and Apatosaurus by 27, 153 

origin of sternum by 27, 152 

IX)licy of Vertebrate Section l)y 27. 153 

skeleton of Canis diru8 by 27, 153 

skull elements in the Tetrapoda 27, 152 

— ; Restoration of Tertiary mammals 24, 105 

— ; South American mammals 23, 85 

Scour of the Saint Lawrence River and lowering of Lake Ontario ; J. W. 

Spencer 27, 79 

ScuDDER, S. H., cited on occurrence of interglacial beds in Canada. . . . 21,435 
Permian elements 30, 593 

— quoted on fossil beetles from the Scarboro beds < 26, 247 

Scuij»TURiNo of rock by wind in the Colorado Plateau province; H. E. 

Gregory '. 26, 393 

"Sea and Land," N. S. Shaler, Reference to 21, 600 

— clifiF erosion, Observations on rate of ; Charles P. Berkey 21, 29, 778 

— deposits 28, 163 

— waves caused by earthquakes 25, 33 

Sears, J. H., cited on allanite 28, 468 

augite syenites 27, 208 

Seattle, Washington, Meeting of the Cordilleran Section of the Geolog- 
ical Society in conjunction with the Pacific Association of Scien- 
tific Societies at 26, 130 

, Pre-Pleistocene geology in the vicinity of 26, 130 

Second report of the Committee on the Nomenclature of the Cranial Ele- 
ments in the Permian Tetrapoda ; W. K. Gregory, Secretary of 
the Committee 28, 210, 973 

Secondary pseudostratification in Santa Barbara County, California ; 

G. D. Louderback 21, 791 

Secretary of the Interior, Letter of Committee on Powell National Park 

to • 23, 45 

— , Report of 21, 35 ; 22, 56 ; 23, 38 ; 

24, 3 ; 25, 51 ; 26, 5 ; 27, 5 ; 28, 6 ; 29, 5 ; 30, 4 

Paleontological Society 21» 72 ; 22, 85 ; 23, 78 ; 

24, 101 ; 25, 131 ; 26, 144 ; 27, 142 ; 28, 193 ; 29, 123 ; 30, 144 

Section at Saint Paul, Minnesota 25, 267 

— of Bad Lands of the Red Deer River 25, 364-365 

Invertebrate and General Paleontology 27, 153 

— ^- the Edmonton-Pierre wntact 25, 369 

Red River, Summary of the geologic 25, 371-379 

Vertebrate Paleontology 27, 149 

Sections illustrating the lower i)art of the Silurian system of south- 
western Ontario ; M. Y. Williams 25, 40 

— of Coal Measures in Maryland 30, 578-582 

the Siluric from Rochester to Lake Huron 25, 304-320 



SECTIONS — SEISMOLOGISTS 263 

Pa^e 

Sections through Copper Mine Hill and Cumberland Hill 25* 469, 471 

Sederholm, J. J., cited on Bothnian slates 27, 189 

metamorphism 28, 413 

Upper Cambrian rocks 27, 557 

8EDIMENTABIES and lavas in Kittitas County, Washington, Relation be- 
tween the tertiary 26, 137 

Seoimkntaby character of garnetiferous hornblende schist, Hanover, New 

Hampshire ; J. W. Merritt 25, 75 

— method in stratigraphy 27, 498 

— rock composition study discussed by J. M. Clarke 29, 85 

— rocks 28, 163 

, Interpretation of 28, 735 

of Pennsylvania 28, 156 

, Significance of sorting in 28, 925 

, Symposium on the interpretation of 28, 162, 206 

, Triassic 27, 624 

— succession in southern New Mexico ; N. H. Darton 27, 86 

Sedimentation along the Gulf Coast of the United States ; E. W. Shaw 27, 71 

— , Catskill 21. 286 

— , Hypothesis of origin of iron ores 23, 323 

— in diastrophism and vulcanisra, R61e of ; F. M. Handy 26, 138 

— , Laws governing 25, 732-737 

— of the interior province 25, 343 

— , Rhythms in 28, 1G2, 776 

Sediments, Climatic types of 28, 920 

— , Composition of clastic 25, 655 

— , Differences between water and wind 25, 740 

— in relation to landslides 27, 58 

— . Modes of origin of 27, 352 

— of Center County, Pennsylvania, Upper Cambrian and Lower Ordo- 

vician 24, 112 

— , Unaltered Paleozoic 26, 85 

— , Usefulness in studying earth history of 29, 84 

Seeley, H. G., cited on oolitic texture 25, 749 

Seely, Henry Mabt^n, Bibiography of 29, 68 

— cited on origin of oolitic texture in limestone rocks 21, 645 

specimen of Stegosauria in Woodwardlan Museum, Cambridge 26, 332 

— , Memorial of 29, 65 

Seidel, , cited on uplifted coral islands 29, 558 

Seishograms, Plates showing 21, 375, 376 

Seismogbaph rec'ords and studies: Alaskan earthquake of 1899... 21,374-383 

. Intervals and times of maxima. Table showing 21, 377, 378 

— , Speed of transmission of earthquake shocks determined by 21,391-395 

— stations, Map showing location of 21, 383 

— , Time of Yakutat Bay earthquake determined by 21, 386 

Seismoobaphic data, Tables establishing 21, 379-382 

Seismogbaphs, Origin of earthquakes located by 21, 376 

Seismologists, Studies of Alaskan earthquake by exi>erienced 21, 374-394 



264 J. STANLEY-BROWN INDEX TO VOLUMES 21 TO 30 

Seismoloot, Resolution concerning 21, 7d4 

Seismotecton^ic lines, Character of * 22, 146 

Seixabds, E. H., cited on natural bridge near Homosassa, Walton County, 

Florida 21, 332 

— ; Correlation between the middle and late Tertiary of the South At- 
lantic Coast of the United States with that of Pacific Coast... 26,416 

— ; Dead lake of the Chipola River, Florida 27, 109 

— , Discussion of plants and human remains in Florida by 28, 197 

— ; Fossil vertebrates from Florida 28. 214 

— , Geological work in Florida of 26, 176 

— ; Origin of the hard rock phosphates of Florida 24, 75, 716 

— quoted on sand of interior of Florida 21, 635, 636 

— ; Stratigraphlc relations of the fossil vertebrate localities of Florida 26, 154 

Selma chalk 25, 332 

Selwyn, Alfred R. G., Reference to report on exploration in British Co- 
lumbia of 27, 716 

Semple, Ellen C, cited on Philippine population 28, 536 

Philippines 28, 515 

Seneca Lake, Depths in and near 23, 480 

Separation of salt from saline water and mud ; E^ M. Kindle 29, 471 

Seroipe, Geology of 30, 321 

Sericite, a low temperature hydrothermal mineral ; A. F. Rogers 26, 395 

Serpentine of Staten Island. . . t 25, 87 

— veins of Diamond HUl-Cumberland district 25, 451 

Serpentines of the central coast ranges of California; H. E. Kramm. 21,793 

Severn River limestone 30, 367 

Sextant sandstone and shale 30, 375 

Sexton Creek limestone 27, 313 

Shackleton, E. H., Reference to work of 29, 475 

Shale and associated deposits of northern Ohio, Olentangy 26. 95 

— , Bedford and Cleveland, Ohio .' 26, 209 

— beds of central New York 28, 131 

— , Graptolite-bearing 28, 205 

— of central Ohio, Olentangy 26, 112, 156 

New Mexico, Mancos 23, 594 

Shaler memorial voyage of 1914 referred to by W. M. David 27, 46 

Shaler, N. S., "Aspects of the earth," Reference to 2I, 330 

— cited on Blackstone series 25, 443-444 

geology of Marthas Vineyard and Nantucket 28, 300, 303 

Marthas Vineyard submergence 29, 188 

Mount Desert 29, 212 

natural bridge at Santa Cruz, California 2I, 326 

New England submergence 30, 593 

origin and nature of soils 23, 630, 632 

wave action 29, 213 

— , Description of beach cusps by 21, 599 

— quoted on beach cusps 21, 599, 600 

— , Reference to his paper "Phenomena of beach and dune sands".... 21,636 



SHALER — SHENANDOAH 265 

Pace 

Shaler, N. S., Reference to his paper "Sea and land" 21, 000 

— ; Spacing of rivers, with reference to hypothesis of baseleveling, Ref- 
erence to 22, 127 

— , Theory of formation of beach cusps 21, 615 

— , Work in Diamond Hill-Ciimberland district by 26, 438 

Shales, Age of Ohio and Chattanooga 27, 465 

— , Brain structures of fossil fishes from the Caney 24, 119 

—.Chagrin, at Cleveland, Ohio 21,24,771 

— of Green River formation. Oil-yielding 27, 159 

Nebraska, Plant tissue in the Caboniferous 24, 113 

— , Regional alteration of oil 26, 101 

Shammatawa limestone 30. 352 

— River, Ordovician section and fossils on 30, 349 

I Shabpe, Daniel, cited on metamorphism 28, 379 

SiiASTAN time, Discussion of 27, 509 

Shaw, E. W. ; Ages of the Appalachian peneplains 28, 128 

peneplains of the Appalachian province 29, 575 

— ; Characteristics of the upper part of the till of southern Illinois and 

elsewhere 29, 76 

— cited on mechanical analyses 28, 934 

mud lumps .' 28, 329 

— , Discussion of geological education of engineers by 28, 138 

rock movement by 28, 125 

on Mississippi silts by 28, 150 

— ; lutermolecular attraction and oil and gas accumulation 28, 158 

— , Mexican petroleum and the war 30, 109 

— ; Quaternary deformation in southern Illinois and southeastern Mis- 
souri 26, 67 

— ; Relation between occurrence and quality of petroleum and broad 

areas of uplift and folding 29, 87 

— ; Sedimentation along the Gulf coast of the United States 27, 71 

— ; Significance of sorting in sedimentary rocks 28, 163, 207, 925 

— ; System of Quaternary lakes in the Mississippi basin 22, 66, 732 

Shawangunk and I^ongwood delta deposits. Conclusions regarding origin 

of 24, 526 

— conglomerates, Delta deposits of North America 24, 492 

— formation, Front Ridge of the northern Appalachians 24, 480 

of Medina age ; Charles Schuchert 26, 150 

— grit and its facial relationships ; Gilbert Van Ingen 22, 55 

Shear scone, Northumberland Volcanic Plug 24, 340 

Shedd, C. B., cited on Chicago blue clay 29, 243 

land-level changes due to glaciation 29, 240 

Sheldonville quartz vein 26, 473 

Shells from the shale slope. New Mexico, List of 23, 616 

— . Internal 4^*haracters of some Mississlppian rhynchonelloid 21, 76, 498 

— , Kock-boring 24, 130 

Sjienanuoah Valley, Virginia, Petrology of a series of nepheline syenite, 

camptonite, monchiquite, and diabase dikes in middle 24, 53, 302-334, 682 



266 J- STANLEY-BROWN — INDEX TO VOLUMES 21 TO 30 

Page 
Shepabd, C. T'., (^i^ological work In Georgia of 25, 173 

Shepard, K. M., oited on natural bridjjefl In (ireen (\muty, Missouri. . . 21,329 

Shepherd, E. S.. The binary systems of alumina witli silica, lime, and 

magnesia. Reference to 21, 166 

— cited on origin of pillow lavas 25, 643 

volcanic phenomena 28, 274, 278 

— and Day, Arthi'r L., The lime silica series of minerals, Reference to 21. 166 
Sherburne bar in Devonian stratigraphy 29. 127 

— sandstone 30, 423 

, Fossils from 30, 427 

Sherzer, W. H., cited on article on Upi)er Siluric strata 27. 72-73, 75-77 

— ; Criteria for the recognition of various types of sand grains 21, 25, 

625-660, 775 

Shetland Islands, Old Red Sandstone of 27, 378 

Shifting and migration of Devonian faunas 21. 76, 285-294 

— Devonian faunas, Facts sustaining the hypothesis of 21, 286-290 

— of Devonian faunas, Limited range of recurrent species in 21, 288 

faunas. Interpretation of the facts relating to 21, 280 

Shimek, B., cited on depauperation of molluskan shells 28, 369 

— ; Evidence that the fossiliferous gravel and sand l>eds of Iowa and 

Nebraska are iVf tonian 21. 31 

— ; Intermingling of Pleistocene formations 23, 48, 709-712. 736 

— ; Loess a llthological term 23. 48, 738 

— , Memoir of Samuel Calvin by 23, 4 

— ; Pleistocene of Sioux Falls, South Dakota, and vicinity....... 22,65,730; 

23, 125-154 
— ; Pleistocene of vicinity of Omaha, Nebraska, and Council Bluffs, Iowa 

22, 65, 730 

— , Reference to field-work on Aftonian gravels of 22. 207 

— ; Tj'pes of loess in the Mississippi Valley 27, 82 

Shimer, F. II., cited on Kaibab limestone 30, 493 

Shimer, H. W., cited on beach cusps 21. 604 

— ; Permo-Triassic of northwestern Arizona 30, 155, 471 

— , Spiriferoids of the Lake Mlnnewanka section. Alberta 24, 112, 233-239 

— and Ci^PP, C. II., Reference to **The Sutton Jurassic of the Vancouver 

group, Vancouver Island," of 27, 709 

Shinarump conglomerate, Herbert E. Gregory 24, 52, 679 

— , Section of the 23, 74 

Shoreline in Maine and New Hampshire, Late Pleistocene 29. 74 

Shorelines, Contra-imiwsetl ; Charles H. Clapp 24, 72, 679 

— of the glacial lakes in the Oberlin quadrangle, Ohio; Frank Carney.. 

21. 21, 762 

Shumard, B. F., Geological work of 25, 165 

Shumard, G. G., Geological work of 25, 165 

Shumardella mUaouHensis (Shumard), Figure showing and description 

of 21, 512 

— n. gen. 21,512 

— (ihsolencrns (Hall) , Figure showing and description of 21, 513 



SIBERIA — SILURIC 267 

Poge 

Siberia, Mammoth tusks from Lena River 26, 407 

SicKENBEBGEB, E., cited OD Origin of oil 28, 730 

SiEBEBO, A., cited on Stromboli 28, 255 

Sierra de los Cabalix)s, Reference to fault-scarps of 26, 65 

Sierra Nevada bedrock complex, General features of the structure of the 24, 98 

, Structure of the southern ; J. P. Bulwada • 26, 403 

, Tertiary-Quaternary orogenlc histoiy of 27, 46 

SiESTAN and Orindan formations, Fauna of 26, 156 

Signal Corps School of Meteorology' ; O. L. Fassig 30, 106 

Significance of glass-making processes to the petrologist ; N. L. Bowen 29, 102 

sedimentary- rhythm ; J. Barrell 28, 162, 206 

sorting in sedimentary rocks ; E. W. Shaw 28, 163, 207, 925 

the Sherburne bar in the Upper Devonic stratigraphy ; A. W. Gra- 

bau 29, 127 

sandstone in upi)er Devonic stratigraphy; A. W. Grabau... 30,423 

SiLEXiTE dikes of New York 30, 93L 

Silica, The various forms and piutual relations of; Clarence E. Fenner. 

24, 53, 681 

SiiJCATE melts. Diffusion in 27, 48 

, Hydrous 29, 102 

Siliceous oolites in shale ; W. A. Tarr 29, 103 

SiLicispoNGi,« of the Cretaceous 29, 142 

Silliman, B., cited on early oil fields. t 28, 621 

Silurian calcareous algie 25, 137 

— dei)osits of the Appalachian region 28, 202 

— Devonian climates, Influence on air-breathing vertebrates of 27, 387 

vertebrates of 27, 40 

— Downtonian formations. Stratigraphy of uppermost 27, 364 

— floras 30, 507 

— formation of Hudson Bay region. Correlation of 30, 367 

— formations of southeastern New York, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania ; 

Charles Schuchert. ; 27, 531 

— fossils of Hudson Bay region 30, 353-370 

— of Brazil 30, 207 

— Ordovician boundary, Inconsistencies in drawing the 27, 463 

— l)aleogeography, New Points in 29, 88 

— rocks of Hudson Bay region 30, 353 

— section of England, Brachiopods of the Edmunds fauna in the 24, 382 

— sections 27, 540 

— strata of the Anticosti embay men t correlated with Alexandrian rocks 

27, 312 

— , Stromatopora from the 30, 157 

— system of Maryland ; C. K. Swartz and W. F. Prouty 27, 89 

southwestern Ontario 25, 40 

SiLURic and Ordovicic systems. Contacts between 26, 286 

— be<ls, Reference to Gulf of Saint Lawrence region, Bay de Chaleur 

and Arisaig, Nova Scotia 21, 716 

— , Comparison of the European and American 28, 129 



268 J- STANLEY-BROWN INDEX TO VOLUMES 21 TO 30 

■ 

Page 

SiLURic discussed by Marjorle 0'Ck)nnell 28, 130 

W. H. Twenhofel : 28,130 

M. Y. Williams 28, 129 

— , Further studies in New York 29, 92 

— in Ontario and New York, The Cataract : A new formation at the base 

of the : 24. 107 

— , Medina, and Cataract formations of the 25, 277 

— sections from Kochoster to Lake Huron 25, 304-320 

— S3'stem, Anticostl Island Niagaran (Anticostian) series 21, 704-716 

Silver City quartzites, A Kansas metamorphic area ; W. H. Twenhofel. . 

28, 164, 419 
Sir.vERTON folio (Colorado), Remarkable rock debris described by Cross 

and Howe in 21, 663 

SiLVESTRi, O., cited on Kilauean rock analysis 27, 54 

Simmer, Hans, quoted on direction of fracture lines in Africa 22, 162 

Simpson, -> — , cited on occurrence of interglaclal beds in Canada 21, 435 

— , Fossils secured near the house of 25, 367 

Sinclair, J. H. ; Cretaceous of Alberta, Canada 27, 85, 673 

Sinclair, W. J., acted as secretary at meeting of Vertebrate Paleontology 

Section 27, 149 

— cited on OJo Alamo beds 25, 379 

— Nacimento terrane 25, 382 

Puerco mammals .• ; •. . . 25,338 

Torrejon stratigraphy 25, 401 

— ; Contributions to geologic theory and method 23, 86, 262 

— , Correlation and paleogeography discussed by 23, 85 

— , Discussion on Varanosaurus species, a Permian Pelycosaur 21, 74 

— ; Labyrinthodont from the New^ark series 28, 213 

— ; "Laramie?" Puerco and Torrejon in the San Juan Basin, New Mexico 

25, 138 

— , Pyrotherium Beds of Patagonia discussed by '. 24, 52, 107 

— , Reference to investigations by : 25, 323 

studies of JCocene faunas by 25, 144 

symposium paper by 25, 130 

— ; Some Glacial deposits east of Cody, Wyoming, and their relation to 
the Pleistocene eroslonal history of the RocTiy Mountain region.. 

23, 45, 731 

— and Granger, Walter ; Kocene and 01igo<rene of W^ind River and Big 

Horn basins 22, 63, 722 

;The Lambdotherium zone in the Big Horn basin, Wyoming... 22,95 

— and Ulrich, E. O. ; Interdependence of stratigraphy and paleontology 21, 73 
SiNGEWALD, J. T., Jr.; Microstructure of titaniferous magnetites. . 24,73,704 

— ; Sand-chrome deposits of Maryland 30, m 

SiNNOTT, E. W., cited on evolution of herbs 30, 528 

Sioux Falls and vicinity, Bluff sections 23, 136-144 

, Loesses of 23,153 

^ Pleistocene of , 23, 125-154 

, Table of elevations ^ . . . 23, 153 



SIOUX ^SMITH 269 

Page 

Sioux Falls and vicinity, Terrace or bench sections 23, 144 

, Topography of 23, 130 

section, Pleistocene formation of the 23, 711 

, South Dakota, The Pleistocene of the vicinity of 22, 65, 730 

Siphonalia sutterenais zone in the Roseburg quadrangle, Oregon, Fauna 

of the 26, 169 

of California 29, 163 

Sitka, Alaska, Installation of magnetograph and seismograph at 21,400 

Sjogren, Otto, Reference to studies on Abisko Canyon, in Swedish Lap- 
land 22, 145 

Skeats, E. W., cited on atolls , 20, 565 

chemical deposition 28, 739 

Tertiary coral reef 28, 434 

Skeleton and restoration of Camarasaurus ; H. F. Osborn and C. C. 

Mook 28, 215 

— of Bla8toceru8 pampwus (fossil deer) 27, 153 

Canis dirus. Mounted 27, 153 

Diatryma, a gigantic bird of the Lower Eocene ; W. D. Matthew 

and Walter Granger 28, 212 

Notharctus, an Eocene lemuroid ; W. K. Gregory 25, 141 

Skeletons of Diplndw^us and Apatosaurus in the Carnegie Museum ; 

W. J. Holland 27, 153 

Skiou, Invention and explanation of term 23, 116 

Skull elements in the Tetrapoda 27, 152 

— of Tyrannosaurus ; 11. F. Osborn 21, 75 

— structure of Thalattosaurus 27, 171 

Slates at Slate Springs, California, Jurassic age of ; Charles H. Davis 24, 131 

— of Permocarboniferous age, Banded glacial 27, 110 

Slipper, S. E., cited on modifications necessary in Cairnes' map 27, 676 

Sloan, E., State Geologist of South Carolina 25, 160 

Slosson, E. E., cited on Popo Agle beds 29, 597 

Sloths, Megalocnus and other Cuban ground- 26, 152 

— , Posterior foot of Mylodont • 27, 170 

Sluiteb, C. p., cited on coral reefs .• 29, 527 

Smith, Burnett, cited on Brewerton shale 29, 349 

— , Discussion of fish fauna of Eighteen-mile Creek, New York, by. . . . 26, 154 

Smith, Elliot, Reference to his observations on the Tupalidse 24, 248 

Smith, Eugene A., cited on life of Mr. Tuomey 25, 169 

— , Delivery of presidential address by 25, 48 

— elected President 24, 9 

— , Geological work In Alabama of 25, 170 

— , Meeting of December 31 called to order by 25, 48 

First Section called to order by 25, 84 

Group B, Second Section, called to order by 25, 39 . 

— ; Memoir of Daniel W. Langton, Jr 21, 13-16 

— , Memorial of E. A. Hilgard by .^ 28, 40 

-• Robert Hills Loughridge by 29, 48 

— , Opening of meeting by 25, 4 



270 J. STANLEY-BROWN INDEX TO VOLUMES 21 TO 30 

Page 

Smith, Eugene A. ; Pioneers In Gulf Coastal Plain };eology 26. Vu 

— , Reference to speech at dinner by 25, 80 

— , Work on cotton reports of 26, 176 

Smith, 6. O., cited on amygdaloidal diabases 26, 620 

effects of weather on vegetal growth 26, 529 

— ; Economic limits to domestic indei)endence in minerals 30, 98 

— , Geology and public service by 28, 127 

— t Letter concerning formation names by 26, ^ 

— , Military contribution of civilian engineers 30. 70, .'599 

— , Reference to speech at dinnor by 26. 80 

Smith, G. S. ; American mapping in France 30, 110 

Smith, H. IL, quoted on phosphorescent termites 21, 492 

— , Specimens of genus Rhipidomella collected by 21, 300 

Smith, J. P. ; The biogenetic law illustrated in the development of fossil 

Cephalopoda 24. 129 

— , California Meeting of the Paleontological Society, Session August 4, 

1915, called to order by 26, 412 

— cited on coral fauna of Lower Noric age 27, 709 

"Cordilleran Revolution" 2T, 508 

fossils from Nevada of the Middle Trlassic 27, 705 

Mesos&olc fossil 29, 601 

studies and correlations of Triassic rocks of California, Nevada, 

and Oregon 27, 687 

Sundance formation 29, 257 

Triassic and Jurassic faunas 27, 500 

west coast Triassic 27^505, 507 

— ; Climatic relations of the Tertiary of the west coast 28, 226 

zones in the Pliocene of the Pacific coast 27, 172 

— , Discussion of paleontologic criteria in time relations by 26, 411 

Triassic deposits of Japan by 26, 413 

on the symposium "Correlation of the Cretaceous" by 26, 414 

— , Pacific Coast Section of the Paleoiitologi(»al Society presided over by 

President 24, 126 

— , Reference to "The Middle Triassic marine invertebrate faunas of 

North America" of 27, 705 

occurrence of coral reefs in the Triassic of North America 

of 27, 699-700, 709 

— ; Relations of the invertebrate faunas of the American Triassic to 

those of Asia and Europe 26, 412 

— , Remarks on Monotis fossil form by 27, 173 

— , Species identified by 27, 680 

— , Structure of the Sierra Nevada bedrock complex discussed by 24, 98 

— , Terrestrial Triassic forms discusseil by 26, 413 

— , Thanks rendered to 27, 679 

— ; Tropitidie of the Upper Triassic of California 29, 162 

Smith, P. S., elected Fellow 21. 4 

— ; Geology of the Lake Ida ta rod region, Alaska 27, 114 

— ; Glaciation in northwestern Alaska 23, 44, 563-570 



SMITH SOIL 271 

Page 
Smith, P. S., Reference to "Notes on the jceology of Gravina Island, 

Alaska," of 27, 700 

"The Noatak-Kobuk region, Alaska" 27, 704 

war work of 30, 176-181 

Smith, R. A., cited on salt in rainwater 29, 474 

Smith, W. D., cited on increasing oil production 28. 676 

island subsidence 29, 518 

— elected Fellow 21, 4 

— ; Geologic and physiographic influence in the I*hilii>pines 28, 515 

— ; Geology as a synthetic science 30, 77 

— ; Physiographic control in the Philippines 26, 395 

— ; Salient features of the geology of the Cascades of Oregon, with some 

correlations between the east coast of Asia and the west coast of 

America 29, 81 

— ; War work of the Department of.Geologj' at the I^niversity of Oregon 30, 83 

Smith, William, cited on determinable stratigraphy 27, 492 

stratigraphic geology 27, 177 

stratigraphy 28, 735 

Smith, W. S. T., elected Councilor Cordilleran Section 23, 70; 25, 125 

— ; Origin of the sandstone at the State prison near Carson City, Ne- 
vada 23, 73 

— , Orthoclase as a vein mineral discusse<l by ' 23, 72 

— ; Polarized skylight and the i)etrographic microscope 25, 120 

— ; Some graphic methods for the solution of geologic problems 25, 120 

— ; Tables for the determination of crystal dassc's 21, 731-736, 790 

SMITHFIEI.D limestones 25, 440, 443 

Smithsonian Institution, Reference to investigation of solar heat by. 25,485 

Smock, J. C, cited on Catskill glaciation 28, 549 

Smyth, C. H., Jr., Acknowledgments to 25, 244 

— , Analyses by 27, 215 

— cited on Adirondack rocks 25, 246, 254 

derivation of alkali-rich rocks 27, 329 

Furnacevllle iron ore 29, 343 

oolitic iron ore of the Clinton formation 21, 648 

syenite and granite of Adirondacks '. 27, 213 

— quoted on Sylvania sandstone 21, 655 

Smyth, II. L., cited on Keweenaw series 27, 95 

Marquette greenstones 25, 614 

Snow arch in Tuckcrmans Ravine on Mount Washington : James Walter 

Goldthwait 28, 144 

Soci#:t6 Geologique de France, Cablegram of congratulations to 30, 116 

SoDA-SYENiTKS from Maine 29, 463 

, Relation of litchfieldite to 29, 99 

SoDDY, F., cited on "isotopes" and radio-elements 26, 191 

radio-thermal action 28, 903 

SoDUS shale 29, 345 

Soil characteristic's. Geologic relation of 27, 114 

— flow as a transporting agency in northern Greenland, Imi)ortance of. 29, 72 



272 J. STANLEY-BROWN — INDEX TO VOLUMES 21 TO 30 

Page 

SoKOLOW, N., cited on cosmic theory 228, 728 

experiments with sand grains 21, 641 

— , Reference to work of 28, 737 

SoKOTRA granite, Analysis of 25, 466 

Solar liypotfaesis of climatic changes; E. Huntington 25, 82, 477-484 

80LID substances, Effect of high pressure on 24, 50, 674 

Solidification, Uncertainty of undercooling 21, 148 

SoLLAS, W. J., cited on duration of Paleozoic era 28, 815 

geologic time 28, 815 

measurement of geologic time 28, 754 

sedimentation 28, 793, 813 

thickness of the post-Archean 28, 820 

— , Reference to work of 28, 738 

* Solomon, ,* cited on war geology 30, 169 

Solution of carbonates in subalkaline magma. Effects of the 21, 108 

SoMBEB beds 25, 325 

Some contact metamorphic minerals in crystalline limestone at Crest- 
more, near Riverside, California ; A. S. Eakle 25, 125 

— definite correlations of West Virginia coal beds in Mingo County, 

West Virginia, with those of Letcher County, southeastern Ken- 
tucky ; I. C. White 29, 96 

— factors which' affect the deposition of calcium carbonate; John John- 

son ;...,.... 27, 49 

— features of the Kansan drift in southern Iowa ; George K. Kay .... 27, 115 

— fossil algse from the oil-yielding shales of the Green River formation 

of Colorado and Utah ; Chas. A. Davis 27, 159 

— fundamental points in the classification of trilobites ; P. E. Raymond 28, 209 

— further consideration of the forces developed in crystal growth; 

Arthur L. Day 28, 154 

— graphic methods for the solution of geologic problems ; W. S. T. Smith 

25,120 

— historical evidence of coastal subsidence in New England ; C. A. Davis 25, 61 

— littoral and sublittoral physiographic features of the Virgin and north- 

em Leeward Islands and their bearing on the coral-reef problem ; 
Thomas Wayland Vaughan 27, 41 

— morphological variations in Platystrophla ; Mrs. Eula D. McEwan.. 28,201 

— new paleogeographic maps of North America ; A. W. Grabau 25, 136 

— observations of the volcano Kilauea in action ; A. L. Day 25, 80 

on the osteology of Diplodocus ; W. J. Holland 29, 130 

— physical features of Hawver Cave ; J. C. Hawver 25, 155 

— problems of the Adirondack Precambrian ; H. L. Ailing 30, 155 

international readjustment of mineral supplies as indicated in 

recent foreign literature ; E. F. Bliss 30, 101 

— structural features in the Green Mountain belt of rocks ; C. E. Gordon 

27, 101 

of a fossil embryo crinoid ; George H. Hudson 28, 204 

— west coast mactridee ; E. Packard 25, 151 

SoBBY, H. C, cited on age of sand grains, deposits wherein found 2I, 626 



80RBY — SPENCER 273 

Pace 

SoBBY, H. C, cited on classification of sand grains 21, 026, 637 

experimental geology 29, 175 

metamorphism 28, 379 

origin of oolites 25, 760 

sand derived from wave action 21, 644 

grains from the new red sandstone of Penrith, England. . . . 21, 649 

structure and origin of noncalcareous stratified rocks. ... 21, 628, 632 

— , Reference to work of 28, 736 

SosMAN, R. B., cited on igneous rocks 28, 273 

— , Reference to work of 29, 186 

— and Day, A. L., Reference to their work on high temperature 21, 145 

HosTETTEB, J. C. ; Fcrrous iron content and magnetic properties of 

the natural oxides of iron as an index to their origin and history 27, 60 
SouLE, Frank, and Humphrey, R. L., cited on San Francisco earthquake 

and fire of 1906 21. 406 

Sources and tendencies in American geology ; J. Barrell 30, 77 

South America, Age of certain plant-bearing beds in 29, 637 

plant-bearing beds and associated marine formations in. . . . 30, 153 

, Bibliography of the geological and geographical literature of the 

Andean Republic of 24, 75 

, Fresh-water fish faunas of 29, 138 

, Mesoasoic fioras of 29i 129, 607 

reptiles of 29, 138 

, Paleoacoic floras of «... 29, 129 

, Petroleum supply of 28, 611 

, Tertiary and Pleistocene formations of Peru 29, 165 

crustal movements in 21, 215 

South American mammals ; W. B. Scott 23, 85 

South Carolina, Creation of Geological Survey of 26, 160 

, Distribution of allanite in 28, 477 

, Geological work in 2S, 168 

mastodon ; F. B. Loomis 28, 210 

South Dakota, Lance formation of 26, 348 

, Long-Jawed mastodon skeleton from 29, 133 

, Natural bridge at Buffalo Gap 21, 320 

in Bad Lands 21,315 

Big Bad Lands 21, 325, 326 

, Pleistocene of Sioux Falls and vicinity 23, 125-154 

, Precambrian structure of Black Hills 27, 106 

Southern Illinois, Characteristics of upper part of till of 29, 76 

— Ontario, Deformation of unconsolidated beds in 28, 163 

Spaixanzani, L., cited on Stromboll 28, 265 

Sparnacian and Ypresian equivalent to Wasatch 26, 396 

Species, Intracolonial acceleration and retardation and its bearing on; 

Amadeus W. Grabau 21, 76 

Specific weight of drill cores ; Alfred O. Lane 27, 49 

Speculative nature of geology ; W. M. Davis 24, 70, 687 

SPEI7CER, A. C, cited on glaciation in Alaska 21, 725 

XVIII — ^BuLL. Geoi/. Soc. Am. 



274 J. STANLEY-BROWN INDEX TO VOLUMES 21 TO 30 



Spencer, A. C, cltod on I*euiisylvauia Precambrian 29t 376 

— and ScHRADEB, F. C, Uefereuce to "The geology and mineral resources 

of a portion of the Copper River district, Alaska,*' of 27, 693 

Spencer, J. W., Altitude of Algoncjuin beach, 1887. measured by 21,233 

— : Cause of the i>ostglacial deformation of the Ontario rej^ioii 25, 65 

— cited on channel of ancient Algonquin River 21, 241 

deformation of the Iroquois beach and birth of Lake Ontario. . 21.242 

Dundas section, Ontario 25, 315 

evolution of the Falls of Niagara 21, 242 

Hamilton section, Ontario 25, 313 

interglacial wood 26, 251 

Iro<iuois shore ^ 27, 242 

James Bay uplift 29, 2a3 

the focus of regional post-Glacial uplift 21, 242 

— f (Moslng phase of glaciation in New York discussed by 23, 47, 737 

— ;Covey Hill revisited 23.36.471-475,721 

— , Deformation of the Algonquin Beach discussed by 24, 71 

— , Discussion of coastal subsidence by 25, 60-61 

earth-movements in Minnesota by 25, 35 

Nebraskan and Kansan drifts by 23, 47 

sul>mergenc?e of Connecticut and Hudson valleys 25, 64 

time measures in the Niagara gorge by 25, 36 

on gorge of the Hudson by 21, 21, 760 

isobases of the Algonciulu and Iroquois beaches by 21, 21, 760 

natural bridges of North America by 21, 22 

— ; Evolution of the Falls of Niagara, Reference to 21, 43;^ ; 24, 226 

— ; Extended determination of i)ost-(}lacial earth movements from the 

Lake region to the Saint Lawrence Valley 24. 74, 217-227, 714 

— .Geological light from the Catskill Aqueduct distrussod by 24,74,711 

work in Georgia of 25, 174 

— , Glacial erosion in the Genesee Valley system and its bearing on the 

Tertiary drainage problem of eastern New York, discussed by 24, 76, 718 
— ; Great I^ke basins in their relationship to the Niagara limestone 24, 76, 229 

— . Lifting of the Algonquin beach first recognized by 21, 231 

— , Names "lake Algonquin," "Algonquin beach," and "Algonquin river" 

first used by 21, 229 

— ; Partial drainage of Niagara Falls in February, 1009 21. 26, 447-448 

— , Post-Glacial earth movements discuss3d by 24, 715 

erosion and oxidation discussed by 23, 47, 739 

— ; Recession of Niagara Falls remeasured in 1914 27, 78 

— ; Relationship of the Niagara River to the Glacial period 21, 26, 433-440, 763 

— ; Relative work of the two falls of Niagara 21, 22, 763 

— , Remarks on New England terraces by 27, 66 

— ; Scour of the Saint Lawrence River and lowering of Lake Ontario. . 27, 79 

— , Stability of the Atlantic coast discu-'sed by 23, 49, 741 

— , Submarine cham«?cypari8 lx)g at Woods Hole discussed by 24, 72 

— , Term "Forest Glen Epoch" given by 21, 439 

— ; Terrestrial stability of tlie Great Lake region 27, 79 



SPHERULITES — STANTON 276 

Page 
Spherulttes and lithophysie 26, 262 

Spirifer boonenaisf. Fossil of Wasatch region 21, 530 

— cameratusf. Fossil of Wasatch region 21, 530 

— kentuckyensisT, Fossil of Wasatch region 21, 530 

— rockynwntanus, Fossil of Wasatch region 21, 520 

Spiriferoids, Affinities of the fauna 24, 234 

— of Lake Minnewanlca section, Alberta ; H. W. Shimer 24, 112, 233-239 

, Description of Devonian, Mississippiau, and Pennsylvanian 

species 24, 235-239 

, Distribution of 24, 234 

Splitting of beaches, Reference by H. L. Fairchild to 27, 245 

Spoerer*s law of shifting sunspots. Reference to 25, 510 

Spring, W., cited on experimental geology 29, 175 

Spring Mountain range. Ancient syncline of the. Figure showing 21, 553 

Springer, Frank, collection of Crinoids, Reference to 24, 110 

— ; Crinoid genus f^cyphocrinus and its bulbous root, Camarocrinus . . . 24, 110 
Springs, Changes produced by a sinking water table on ; T. C. Hopkins. . 

21, 25, 774 

Spruce, Richard, quoted on operations of ants 21, 459, 460, 461, 462 

Spurr, J. E., cited on Birch Creek series of Alaska 25, 186 

mountain ranges of Nevada 21, 546 

— ; Commercial control of the mineral resources of the world 30, 108 

— ; Investigation of the Mesabi ores 23, 323 

— ; Origin and structure of the basin ranges, Reference to 22, 153 

— quoted on **chief faults of the basin ranges of Nevada and California" 

22, 153 

— , Reference to statement on fault-planes 26, 65 

war work of 30, 177 

Spurs, Characteristics of glacier junctions 21, 721 

Squantum, Massachusetts, Glacial slate of 28, 152 

Stabler, H., cited on measurement of geologic time 28, 754 

rate of denudation 28, 821 

Staff, H. von, cited on Tendaguru series 29, 264 

Stages in the geologic history of Porto Rico ; Chester A. Reeds 27, 83 

Stalder, W., Eocene of the Coalinga-Cantua district, California, dis- 
cussed by 24, 127 

Standard sections, Use in geologic correlation 27, 526 

Stanford University Meeting of the Pacific Coast Section of the Paleon- 

tological Society, Papers of the 26, 166 

Summer Meeting of the Geological Society of America, 1915, held 

at 26, 389 

Stanley-Brown, Joseph, Editor's report by 21, 39 ; 22, 60 ; 23, 42 ; 

24,7; 25,56; 26,10; 27,9; 28,10; 29,9; 30,9 

— elected Editor 21,3; 22,3; 23,2; 24,9; 

25, 5 ; 26, 11 ; 27, H ; 28. 12 ; 29, 11 ; 30, 11 

— ; History of the Bulletin 25, 24 

— , Reference to speech at dinner by 25, 80 

Stanton, T. W., Acknowledgments to 25, 356 



278 J. STANLEY-BROWN — INDEX TO VOLUMES 21 TO 30 

Stock, Chesteb; Gravigrade edentates In later Tertiary deposits of 

North America 29, 161 

— ; Ha wver Cave : its Pleistocene fauna 25, 155 

— ; Minutes of the Eighth Annual Meeting of the Pacific Coast Section 

of the Paleontological Society 29, 160 

— ; Occurrence of Nothrotheriuiu in Pleistocene cave deposits of Cali- 
fornia 28, 233 

— ; Pleistocene mammal fauna of Ha wver Cave, a fissure deposit near 

Auburn, California 27, 160 

— ; Structure of pes in Mylodon. harlani and its bearing on the problem 
of supposed human origin of footprints o(?curring near Carson, 

Nevada 28, 226 

the posterior foot in the Mylodon t sloths of Rancho La Brea. . 27, 170 

— ; Succession of Miocene faunas in the John Day Region 28, 215 

— ; Supplementary data bearing on the composition and age of the Thou- 
sand Creek Pliocene fauna 28, 226 

— , Systematic position of the Milodont sloths from Rancho La Brea . . 25, 143 
— , Merbiam, John (>., and Moodv, C. L. ; Fauna of the rodeo Pleistocene 

27.169 

Stockton, C. H., cited on ice-action at Point Barrow 28, 333 

Stokes, G. G., cited on relation between gravity and latitude discovered 

by Clairaut 26, 174 

Stokes, H. N., Analyses by 27, 206 

Stolleb, J. H., cited on differential uplift 27, 66 

uplift in Schenectady-Albany district 27, 244 

— ; Topographic features of the Hudson Valley and the question of post- 
glacial marine waters in the Hudson-Champlain Valley 30, 90, 415 

Stone, G. H., cited on deltas 29, 190 

glacial gravels and clays of Maine 29, 198 

Maine coast 29, 213 

marine sands 28, 316 

submergence in Maine 29, 211 

Stone, R^W., cited on Livingston formation of Montana 25, 346 

stratigraphic relations of Livingston formation 25, 346 

— ; Glacial Lake Missoula 25, 87 

. — ; Magnesite industry 30, 115 

— ; Phosphate rock an economic army 30, 104 

— and Calvert, W. B. ; Stratigraphic relations of the Livingston beds of 

central Montana 21, 31, 781 

Stone age of Europe, Migration and succession of human types of the 

old 26, 149 

Stony Creek divide, Cause of passage of the Hudson (River) over the 22, 183 

section, Ontario 25, 311 

Storm belt of the United States, Chart of 25, 570 

— record in Europe 25, 499 

— tracks in Europe, Chart of 25, 500 

the United States, Chart of ; . . 25, 498 

Storms in China, Dust 24, 92 



STOSE STRATIGRAPHY 279 

Page 

Stose, G. W., cited on edgewise conglomerate 26* 275 

Pennsylvania peneplains 29, 577 

— , Delta deposits discussed by 23, 48, 744 

— , Fossiliferous conglomerates discussed by 23, 83 

— , Reference to geologic map of 29, 601 

— , Remarks on homoclines by 27, 92 

Maryland stratigraph by 27, 80 

— and Lewis, J. Volney ; Triassic igneous rocks in the vicinity of Get- 

tysburg, Pennsylvania 27, 55, 623 

Strah AN, A., cited on pillow lava 25, 605 

Strand and undertow records of lTpi>er Devonian time as indications of 

the prevailing climate ; J. M. Clarke 29, 83 

— line. Correlation by displacements of the 27, 451 

— lines, Suess on the cause of deformation of 21, 221-234 

Stratiqbapiiic and faunal relations of the later E]ocene of the Pacific 

coast ; Harold Hannibal 26, 168 

Xjincoln formation in Washington; C. E. Weaver 26,169 

succession of the Chester group in Illinois and Kentucky ; Stuart 

Weller 27, 156 

paleontologic geology, Papers on 21, 30, 31 

— break between Pennsylvania f.nd Permian in western North America 28, 169 

— disturbance through the Ohio Valley, running from the Appalachian 

Plateau in Pennsylvania to , the Ozark Mountains in Missouri ; 
James H. Gardner 26, 66, 477 

— geology of Brazil 30, 203 

— relations of the fossil vertebrate localities of Florida ; E. H. Sollards 26, 154 
Livingston beds of central Montana; R. W. Stone and W. B. 

Calvert 21, 31, 782 

Tully limestone and the Genesee shale of New York and Penn- 
sylvania ; A. W. Grabau 28, 207 

— relationships of the Tully limestone and the Genesee shale in eastern 

North America ; A. W. Grabau 28, 945 

— study of the Appalachians and central States with reference to the 

occurrence of oil and gas ; George H. Ashley 23, 37, 725 

— succession of the Cambrian faunas in the Rocky Mountains of British 

Columbia ; C. D. Walcott 24, 52 

Stbattgrapuy and a^e of the Pyrotherium beds of Patagonia, Prelimi- 
nary discussion of the . . . .' 24, 52, 107 

correlation of the Coal Measures of Maryland; C. K. Swartz, W. A. 

Price, Jr., and Harvey Bassler 30, 154 

faunal horizons of the Huerfano basin ; Walter (Granger 28, 216 

paleontology, Interdependence of; W. J. Sinclair and E. O. I'lrich. 21,73 

of southwestern Washington, Tertiary 24, 131 

the Alexandrian series in Missouri and Illinois 24, 111, 351-375 

Salinas and Monterey quadrangles, California; H. J. Haw- 
ley 28, 225 

- structure of the Newark system in Maryland and its relation to the 

Newark system of eastern America ; G. R Dorsey 30, 155 



280 J. STANLEY-BROWN INDEX TO VOLUMES 21 TO 3O 

Page 

Stbatiqrapht in eastern Pennslyvania 29» M 

-- of Alexandrian rocks in Illinois 87, 306-307 

Wisconsin 27,308-310 

Biri limestone, Norway 27, 570 

Goal Measure of Maryland 30, 570 

Lower Devonian— Lower Old Red .•. 27, 366-370 

Ordovicic of Christiania region 27, 609 

Middle Old Red— Orcadian formations 27, 370-378 

Old Red Sandstone 27, 364 

Paleozoic rocks of Hudson and James bays 30, 339 

Red beds of New Mexico ; N. H. Darton 25, 81 

some formations bitlierto called Beck with and Bear River, in south- 
eastern Idaho ; George R. Mansfield and P. V. Roundy 27, 70 

the Canadian cordlllera ; Lancaster D. Burling 27, 158 

coal fields of northern central New Mexico; Willis T. Lee. 23,571-686 

Lower Kinderhooklan 29, 93 

Pennsylvanian of northeastern Oklahoma ; D. W. Ohern. 22,63, 720 

New York Clinton; G. H. Chadwick 29,327 

• — region about Three Forks, Montana, New facts bearing on the 

Paleozoic; W. P. Haynes ' 26,157 

Wasatch Mountains 21, 618-533 

Wyoming red beds. 27, 120 

— , Significance of Sherburne sandstone in ^vonic 30, 423 

— , Upper Cretaceous 26, 149 

Stream meanders ; E. B. Brantson 29, 79 

Streams of Veta peak, Colorado, Rock 21, 663-676 

Stbeno, a., cited on pillow structure 25, 598 

Stricklandinia lens beds, Anticosti island *. 21, 714 

Stromatofoba growth on edgeon conglomerate from the Silurian ; J. M. 

Clarke 30, 157 

Strom atofoboids from Pennsylvania, Exhibition of polished specimens of 

Ozarkian ; G. R. Wieland 24, 115 

Strombou, Persistence of vents at 28, 165, 249 

— volcano, Italy 26, 387 

Stboner, R. C. ; Occurrence of mammalian remains at Rancho La Brea 26, 156 
Structural and physical geology. Papers on 21, 22-25 

— classification of petroleum and natural-gas fields • 28, 553 

— features of the Green Mountains 27, 101 

Tsin Ling Shan ; G. D. Louderback 26, 405 

— geology of the Hanover district. New Hampshire, Notes on 24, 50, 672 

Structure and affinities of the Multltuberculata ; U. Broom 26, 140 

— of some mountains in New Mexico ; N. H. Darton 29, 72 

the bedrock complex of the Sierra Nevada, General features of the 24» 98 

Pacific ranges, California ; B. Willis , 30, 84 

pes in Mylodon harlatU and its bearing of the problem of sup- 
posed human origin of footprints occurring near Carson, Califor- 

nia ; Chester Stock 28, 226 



STRUCTURE 8UESS 281 

Pag» 
Stbuctube of the posterior foot in the Mylodont sloths of Rancho La 

Brea ; Chester Stock ^. 27, 170 

Sauropod Dinosaurs ; W. J. Holland *. 21, 74 

southern Sierra Nevada ; J. P. Bulwada 26, 403 

Strutt, R. J., cited on accumulation of helium 28, 875 

helium 26, 190 

— ; On the distribution of radium in the earth's crust and on the earth's 

internal heat. Reference to 22, 122 

— and KoENiosBEBGEB, JoHAjvN, Cited on equation of earth's rediation. 26,197 

Stbykeb, M., Acknowledgments to 28, 420 

Stuabt, M., cited on origin of oil 28, 731 

Studer, 6., cited on metamorphism 28, 378 

Studies of glaciation in the White Mount4iius of New Hampshire ; James 

Walter Goldthwait 2T, 67 

Study of ripple-marks ; Walter A. Bucher 27, 109 

the recent activity of Mauna Loa ; Arthur L. Day 28, 127 

sediments as an aid to the earth historian ; E. Black welder 29, 84 

Stupabt, R. F., Seismograph record of Alaskan earthquake of September 

3, 1899, reproduced by 21, 375 

Stub, Diomys ; Dominance of the diagonal and meridional directions of 

drainage, controlled by fractures, shown by 22, 162 

SuBALKAUNE and alkaline rocks. Association of 21, 89, 90 

— coast range bathollth of British Columbia and Alaska, Area of 21, 90 

— magma, EfiTects of the solution of carbonates in 21, 108 

— magmas, Alkaline rocks genetically connected with 21, 90 

Subdivisions of the Thaynes limestone and Nugget sandstone, Mesozolc, 

in the Fort Hall Indian Reservation, Idaho ; George R. Mansfield 27, 70 

Traverse group of Michigan and its relation to ^ther mid-De- 

vonic formations ; Amadeus W. Grabau 27, 159 

SuBLACusTBiNE glacial erosion in Montana ; W. M. Davis 25, 86 

SuBMABiNE chamfecyparis bog at Woods Hole, Massachusetts, and its re- 
lation to the problem of coastal subsidence; Douglas W. Johnson. 

24, 72, 699 

— topography of Glacier Bay, Alaska ; L. Martin 25, 88 

SuBMEBGED ''deeps" in the Susquehanna River ; E. B. Mathews 28, 335 

Submutations and mutations among invertebrates 27, 148 

SuBPBOviNCiAL limitations of Precambrian nomenclature in the Saint 

Lawrence basin ; M. E. Wilson 29, 90 

Subsidence of reef -encircled islands ; W. M. Davis 29, 71, 489 

— on the coast of Maine, Evidence of recent ; C. A. Davis 26, 91 

Subtebbanean "chalk streams" of northern France; E. M. Burwash •30,91 

Succession of Miocene faunas in the John Day region ; J. C. Merriam, 

Chester Stock, and Clarence L. Moody 28, 215 

Sudan, Observations on sand-blast made in the Anglo-Egyptian ; W. H. 

Hobbs 26, 396 

SuESS, Edouakd, cited on denudation 28, 822 

independent movements of the sea .,. . . 27, 493 

monoclines 27, 91 



282 J. STANLEY-BROWN INDEX TO VOLUMES 21 TO 30 

• Pag« 

SuESS, Edouabd, Congratulatory cablegram at annual dinner sent to 23t 47 

letter sent to 21. 28 

— elected Correspondent 21, 4 

— ; Interpretation of the plan of Asia 21, 183-188 

— f Method of interpretation of phenomena of crustal deformation of . . . 

21, 188-190 

— , Reference to his work "The face of the earth" 21, 183 

work on sedimentaries by 28, 737 

— , Reply to congratulatory letter 21, 28 

— , Secretary reports letters received in answer to cablegram to 23, 47 

SuEss, F. E., cited on australites 27, 51 

moldavites as of meteoritic origin 26, 281 

SuLFOMiNERALfi relation to bomite 25, 90 

Sulphide minerals at Butte, Montana : examples of successive replace- 
ment of earlier by later sulphides ; J. C. Ray 26, 402 

— ore enrichment, Some chemical factors affecting secondary; S. W. 

Young 26, 393 

Sumatra, Displacements of triangulation stations in 24, 51, 676 

Summary of geological investigations connected with the Catskill Aque- 
duct ; Charles P. Berkey 28, 174 

the results of investigations of the Floridian and Bahaman shoal- 
water corals ; T. Wayland Vaughan 27, 154 

Summers, H. S., cited on australites 27, 52 

Sun, Uranium and the 26, 194 

Sundance invertebrate fauna 26, 347 

SuNDius, N., cited on pillow lavas 26, 609 

Sun-spot cycles. Chart of 2S, 554 

■ 

— hypothesis of Pettersson 26, 552 

Sun-spots, Effects on storminess 26, 545-546 

— , Nature of 26, 565 

SupAi fauna 30, 491-492 

SuPAN, A., cited on sea sediments 28, 739 

Supplementary data bearing on the composition and age of the Thou- 
sand Creek Pliocene fauna; J. C. Merriam, Chester Stock, and 

E. M. Butterworth 28,276 

Surface forms on faulted structures. Nomenclature of 24, 187-215 

Survey of the 40th parallel, Fault at Waterfall canyon described by. . 21, 539 

, Interpretation of Wasatch structure derived from 21,533 

Susquehanna River, Submerged "deeps" of the 28, 151, 335 

Sutton, W. J., Memorial of 27, 35 

— , Photograph of 27, 35 

— limestone of Vancouver Island 26, 82 

Swallow, G. C, on committee Cincinnati meeting, 1881 2I, 742 

SwARTZ, C. K., Acknowledgments to 29, 330 

— cited on proposed classification of crystals 21, 731 

— ; Generalized section through the Appalachian Mountains of Maryland 

21, 24, 709 

— and Bassler, Harvey ; Typical section of the Allegheny formation . . 30, 153 



SWAirrZ SYSTEMATIC 283 

Page 
8WABTZ, C. K., Price, W. A., Jk., and Bassleb, H. ; Coal Measures of 

Maryland 30, 567 

; Stratigraphy and correlation of the Coal Measures of Mary- 
land 30, 154 

Prouty, W. F. ; Silurian system of Maryland 27, 89 

Sweden, Origin of the Iron ores at Kiruna 26, 99 

~, Pillow lavas in 26, 609 

— , Reference to glacial geology of 25, 213 

SwEDEiVBORo, Emmanuel, Cause of displaced strand-lines suggested hy 21,225 
SwENSKA, K., Reference to "Vetenskaps Akademlens Handlingar** by. . 27,586 

Swifts Camp Creek, Campton, Kentucky, Rock bridge across 21, 315 

Switzerland, Natural bridges of 21, 333, 334 

Syenite, Age relations of 27, 233 

— (akerite) of the middle and northern Blue Ridge region, Virginia, 

Hypersthene ; T. L. Watson and J. H. Cllne 26, 82 

— , Analyses of 27, 199 

feldspar composition of 27, 216 

hypersthene 27, 202 

— (andesiue anorthosite) , Analyses of 27, 211 

of Virginia compared with hyi)ersthene syenite 27, 209 

— of Blue Ridge region, Hypersthene 27, 193 

— , Quartz-bearing hypersthene andesine 27, 197 

Syenites from Adirondacks, Analyses of 27, 214 

Sylvania sandstone. Application of principle of recognition of types of 

sand grains to 21, 650-656 

, W. H. Sherzer quoted on 23, 437 

Symphysunts ( ?) yoldfussi Walcott, Fossil of the quartzite at Geneva. 21,527 
Symposium on correlation of Oligocene faunas and formations of the Pa- 
cific Cx)ast 29, 165 

ten years progress in vertebrate paleontology ; R. S. Bassler, Secre- 
tary 23, 85, 155-266 

the close of the Cretaceous and opening of Eocene time in North 

America 26, 130 

geology of petroleum 28, 156, 603, 735 

interpretation of sedimentary rocks 28, 162, 206, 735 

passage from the Jurassic to the Cretacei>us, Joint session with 

the Paleontological Society for the 26, 90, 151 

— problems of faunal and floral relationships In the Antillean Isthmian 

region 29, 129 

"Syntectics" word adapted from Loewinson-Lesslng 21, 90 

Syria and Asia Minor, Post-Tertiary history of the lakes of 21, 20, 755 

— , Reference to climatic changes in 25, 529 

Systematic position of several American Tertiary lagomorphs; Lee R. 

Dice 27, 169 

the dire wolves of the American Pleistocene ; J. C. Merriam. . . 29, 161 

Mylodont sloths from Rancho La Brea ; C. Stock 26, 143 

— rank of mutations and submutations in orthogenetic series among the 

invertebrates ; Amadeus W. Grabau 27, 148 



284 J. STANLEY-BROWN INDEX TO VOLUMES 21 TO 3O 

Szab6, Sm and Roth, Justus, cited on the litbophysse 26, 256 

SzAJNOCHE, L., cited on Argentine fossils 29, 609 

T 

Tabbb, Stephen, cited on gabbro 27, 230 

syenite 27, 197 

titanium-bearing rocks 27, 200 

— ; Origin of veinlets in the limestone, shale, and gypsum beds of c^itral 

New York 28, 131 

— and Watson, T. L., cited on comagmatic area near the Blue Ridge. . 27, 226 

gabbro-nelsonite 27, 228 

; Nelsonite: a new rock t>pe, its occurrence, association, and com- 
position 21,33 

, Reference to "Qeology of the titanium and apatite deposits of 

Virginia" by 27, 197,200 

Tablsb for the determination of crystal classes 21, 731-736 

Tacokic Mountains, Further discoTeries in the ; Arthur Keith 24, 53, 680 

Tatf, J. A., Acting Secretary Summer Meeting, Session August 5, 1915 26, 395 

— cited on unconformity in California Eocene 29, 293 

— , Alexander Deussen introduced by 26, 398 

— , Discussion of Washington coal-bearing fi}ocene by 25, 122 

— , Dust storms in China discussed by 24, 93 

— ; Eocene of the Coalinga-Cantua district, Fresno County, California. 24, 127 

— , Remarks on the unconformity^ at base of Tamiosoma zone by 24, 132 

— , Secretary Summer Meeting, Session August 4, 1915 26, 393 

— and Calkins, F. C, Excursion of California Meeting, August 10, 1915, 

in charge of 26, 408 

Tait, Charles, Reference to Eocene shells collected by 25, 161 

Tait, p. G., cited on age of the earth. .*. .- 28, 901 

measurement of geologic time 28, 749 

Taku glacier, Report of advance of 21, 371 

Talbot, Mionon; A new Dinosaur from the Triassic of the Connecticut 

Valley 22, 94 

Talmaoe, J. E., cited on mirabilite about Great Salt Lake 21, 648 

Talus? Can U-shaped valleys be produced by remoTal of 26, 75 

Tamiosoma zone in the Coalinga oil field, California, Evidence indicating 

unconformity at the base of the ; John H. Ruckman 24, 132 

Tarr, R. S., Acknowledgment to 21, 339 

-— , Bibliography of 24, 41 

— cited on Cape Ann gravel bars 80, 609 

glaclation in Maine 27,264,291 

of the Mount Katahdin region 26, 78 

peneplanation 28, 756 

"through" valleys 21, 720 

White Mountain glaciation 28, 551 

— , Memoir of ; J. B. Woodworfch 24, 29 

— quoted on glacial erosion of the Finger l4ike valleys 24, 139, 140, 141 



\ 



TARR — TAYLOR 285 

Page 

Tabb, R. S., quoted on ori^ of the Great Lakes basin 23, 479 

— , Recent advance of glaciers in the Yakutat Bay region, Alaska, Refer- 
ence to 21, 341, 362 

— , Reference to work in Yakntat Bay region of 21, 339 

— and Martin, LAWBEarcE; Olacial deposits of the continental type in 

Alaska 28. 44. 729 

.Glaciers and glaciation of Yakutat Bay, Alaska, Reference to 21,361 

, Map of Yakutet Bay by • 21, 360 

, Oscillations of Alaskan glaciers by 21,20,758 

; Recent changes of level in the Yakutat Bay region, Alaska, Ref- 

ermice to 21, 841, 361 ; 22, 174 

Tarb, W. A. ; Barite deposits of Missouri 28, 132 

— cited on origin of chert 29, 599 

— , Contribution to the origin of dolomite 80, 114 

— ; Genesis of Missouri lead and zinc deposits 29, 86 

— ; Glauconite in dolomite and limestone of Missouri 29, 104 

— ; Oolite in shale and their origin 29, 587 

— ; Siliceous oolites in shales 29, 103 

Tabumai, a cumulo-volcanic eruption in Japan, 1909; T. A. Jaggar, Jr.'. 

21, 23, 768 

Tatonic question, Arthur Keith on new evidence on the 23, 35, 720 

Taxonomy, Stratigraphic !l7, 457 

Tatu>b, F. B., Acting as Secretary of Gladology and Physiography Sec- 
tion 21, 21 

— ; Bearing of the Tertiary mountain belt on the origin of the earth's 

plan 21, 179-226 

— ; Characters of the older sections of the Niagara Gorge and their cor- 
relation with Great Lakes history 24, 72, 702 

— cited on changes in Lake Chicago 29, 243 

diastrophism 29, 205 

glacial clays. 27, 111 

lakes in the Adirondacks 27, 656 

level changes due to glaciation 29, 241 

measurements of geologic time 28, 747 

Medina formation 85, 287 

moraines of recession .' 28, 826 

till overlying Birds Hill esker gravel and sand 21, 414 

— , Closing phase of glaciation fn New York discussed by 23, 47 

— ; Correlation and reconstruction of recessional ice borders in Berk- 
shire County, Massachusetts 27, 273 

— , Discussion of crustal movements in Lake Brie region by 26, 67 

deformation of the Ontario region by 26, 66 

elevation beaches of Lake Michigan by 28, 142 

glacier erosion by 26, 73 

local glaciation in the Catskill Mountains 28, 133 

Ontario glaciation by 26, 73 

Pleistocene deformation by 28, 165 

on isobases of the Algonquin and Iroquois beaches by 21, 21, 761 



286 J. STANLEY-BROWN INDEX TO VOLUMES 21 TO 30 

Page 

Taylob, F. B., Discussion on Niagara River and tlie Giacial period 21,763 

— ; Landslips and laminated clays in the basin of Lake Bascom 27, 81 

— ; Old shorelines of Mackinac Island and their relations to lake history 26, 68 

— presided at afternoon meeting, December 29 27, 69 

— ; Recent studies of the moraines of Ontario and western New York. . 23, 46 

— , Reference to his study of the moraines of recession 21, 756 

"Lake Adirondack" of 27, 656 

— , Remarks on laminated clays by 27, 113 

— ; Richmond and Great Barrington boulder trains. 21, 747-752 

— , Secretary of Section of Glacial and Physiographic Geology 21, 25 

— ; Study of ice-sheet erosion and deposition in the region of the Great 

Lakes 22, 65, 727 

— , Time measures in the Niagara gorge and their application to Great 

Lake history 25, 35 

Taylor, W. P. ; History of the Aplodontia group 26, 417 

— , Reference to description of antelopes by 25, 155 

Taxonomic parallels (American), The pre-Cambrian of Sweden, with 

comments on 22, 55, 719 

Teall, J. J. H., cited on metamorphism 28, 381 

pillow lava 25, 603, 606 

spheroidal greenstones 25, 635 

TECTONIC lines in the Hawaiian Islands; Sidney Powers 27,109; 28,501 

Tectonics of the basin ranges. Character of the older 21, 548 

, Nature of the younger 21, 547 

f desert region 21, 546, 549 

Tehachapi region, Miocene mammalian fauna from 27, 170 

Tejon-Eocene, lone formation of the Sierra Nevada foothills, a local 

facies of the Upper .^ 26, 168 

— group, Fauna of 27, 173 

of California, Section of 29, 285 

— in San Diego County, Fauna of 27, 173 

Teleological considerations, Reference by A. P. Coleman to 27, 192 

Teixeb, F., Reference to "Die Pelecypod-I'auna von Werchojansk in Ost- 

siberian" of 27, 716 

Temasopa limestone, Mother rock of petroleum of Gulf coast of Mexico 24, 255 
Temblob fauna of the San Jos6 and Mount Hamilton quadrangles. Thick- 
ness of 24, 96 

TEMisKAMiTE, A ucw uickel arsenide from Ontario ; T. L. Walker 25, 76 

Tempebatube anomalies for various degrees of cloudiness, Chart of . . . 25, 583 

— measurements, Assurance and range ot 21, 141 

— of melting and solidification in a eutectic series, Diagram showing. 21,152 

Tempebatubes in the United States, List of underground 23, 50 

Templbtton, E. C. ; General geology of the San Jos6 and Mount Hamilton 

quadrangles 24, 96 

Tendaoubu district of German East Africa 26, 328 

— formation of East Africa, Age of 20, 245 

— section 29, 268 

Tennessee, Devonian and black shale of 38, 207 



TEN N ESSKE ^TERTIARY 287 

Page 

Tennessee (east ) , Onyx deposits In 23, 37, 729 

— , Geological Survey of 25, 161 

work in 25, 167 

— , Natural bridge at Lookout Mountain 21, 327, 329 

— , New occurrence of pisanlte and staurolites in 24, 54, 686 

— , Oil development in 28, 624 

— , Pennsylvanian of 27, 70 

— , Reference to limestone region of Kingston 21, 331 

— shale discussed by R. S. Bassler 28, 207 

A. W. Grabau 28, 207 

A. H. Purdue 28,207 

Charles Schuchert 28,207 

E. O. Ulrich 28, 207 

Tentative correlation of the Pennsylvania strata in the eastern interior, 

western interior, and Appalachian regions by their marine faunas ; 

T. E. Savage 29, 97 

Term, An experiment in the invention of a 23, 115 

Term lER, P., cited on metamorphism 28, 396 

Terminal moraines In New England ; C. H. Hitchcock 27, 294 

Termite nests, Relation to soU of 21, 487 

, Relation to vegetation of , 21, 488 

— structures. Age of the mounds of 21, 487 

Termites, Structures of 21, 479-487 

— , White ants or * 21, 476-496 

T^RMs over phrases, Advantages of 23, 112 

Terraces, Glacial 25, 227 

— in Delaware 25, 86 

— of Mount Toby, Cirques and rock-cut 22, 681 

Terrestrial Oligocene of the basin region and its relation to the marine 

Oligocene of the Pacific Coast province ; J. C. Merrlam 25, 153 

— stability of the great lake region ; J. W. Spencer .' 27, 79 

— Triassic forms, Correlation between western North America and Eu- 

rope ; R. S. Lull 26, 413 

Tertiaries, Correlation of American 23, 234 

Tertiary American lagomorphs. 27, 169 

— and Cretaceous correlated with the European succession 25, 394 

floras of Alaska, Correlation of 24, 116 

formations of western North Dakota and eastern Montana; 

A. G. Leonard 22, 63, 722 

In North America, Boundary between 25, 341 

of California, Relation between 25, 152 

periods. Division between 25, 398 

late Cretaceous formations, Correlations of early 25, 393 

later formations, New Mexico and Colorado 23, 607 

Pleistocene formations of the north coast of Peru, South America ; 

G. C. Gesler 20, 165 

Quaternary geology' of western Montana, Northern Idaho, and east- 
ern Washington ; Oscar H. Hershey 23, 75, 517-535 



288 J. STANLEY-BROWN ^INDEX TO VOLUMES 21 TO 30 

Tertiary climate 26, 375 

— Cretaceous boundary in the Rocky Mountain region 25t 325 

problem, Evidence of the Paleocene-vertebrate fauna on the 25, 381 

— crustal movements, Distribution of the deforming force of 21, 219 

In the southern hemisphere 21, 212-218 

— deposits in the Pacific coast and basin regions of North America, CJor- 

relation of the 23. 74 

of Oahu ; C. H. Hitclicock 23, 71 

on west coast of America 29, 298 

— drainage problem of eastern New York, Glacial erosion in the Genesee 

Valley system and its bearing on the 24, 76, 718 

— fauna of the Mojave Desert area 29, 162 

— faunas of the John Day region, Reference to 23, 535 

— floras 30, 528 

of South America 29, 633 

— fold-mountains, Extent of 21, 179-183 

of Eurasia, Figure showing trend limits of 21, 187 

— formations in California 26, 168 

, Method of determining age of 25, 152 

western Washington, Correlation of the 2B» 170 

, Occurrence of dinosaurs in 25, 400 

of Nebraska 28, 197 

Pacific coast and basin regions, Correlation of 25, 156 

South Atlantic and eastern Gulf Coastal Plains, Correlation 

tables of 29, 620 

— geological scale of the Great Basin to that of the Pacific Coast mar- 

ginal province. Relation of the ; J. C. Merriam 26, 136 

— glaciatlon in Colorado 25, 81 

— (later) fauna compared with other faunas 25, 387 

— mammals, Restoration of ; William B. Scott 24, 105 

— moUusks and echinoderms from the vicinity of Tuxpan, Mexico ; R. E. 

Dickerson and S. W. Kew 28, 224 

— mountain belt. Bearing of, on the origin of the earth's plan; Frank 

Bursley Taylor 21, 179-226 

, Description of 21, 179-183 

, Figure showing distribution of 21, 182 

ranges. Map of the world showing 21, 211 

— Nassldffi of the west coast of America ; Stanley C. Herold 28, 227 

— of Brazil 30, 221 

California and Oregon, Corals from the 27, 174 

— of the south Atlantic coast of the United States and that of the Pacific 

coast. Correlation betwfeen middle and late; E. H. Sellards 26, 416 

— paleontology and stratigraphy of southwestern Washington, Prelimi- 

nary report on the ; Charles E. Weaver 24, 131 

— Quaternary orogenlc history of the Sierra Nevada in the light of re- 

cent studies in the Yosemlte region ; F. E. Matthes 27, 46 

— reefs and reef corals 26, 59 

— rocks of Oahu ; C. H. Hitchcock 26, 133 



• 



TERTIAKY — THERMOMETER 



289 



Page 
Tertiaby sands, Problem of the Texas 26t 398, 447 

— sedimentaries and lavas in Kittitas County, Washington, Relation be- 

tween the ; E. J. Saunders 26, 137 

— sedimentary formations of Panama and the West Indies, Correlation 

of the 29. 621 

— , State of our knowledge of the middle American 23, 82 

— stratigraphy divisions of west coast 29, 298 

of the Santa Inez Mountains, Santa Barbara County, California . 29, 164 

Teschenite or analcite-basalt (monchiquoseC?) ) in Virginia, Megascopic 

and microscopic character and chemical composition and classifica- 
tion of 24, 316-320 

Tetracamera, n. gen 21, 503 

— suhcuneata (Ilall), Figure showing and description of 21, 503 

— 8ubtrigona (M. & W.), Figure showing and description of 21, 505 

Tbtbafoda, Cranial elements in the Permian 28, 973 

— , Skull elements in 27, 152 

Tetbaseptata, Classification of 27, 148 

Texas and southeast New Mexico, Notes on the upper Carboniferous in 

western 21, 76 

— , Barite from the Saratoga oil field of • 25, 77 

— , Character of the Permian beds of northern 21, 250 

— , Climatic oscillations In the Permo-Carboniferous beds of 25, 41 

— , Composition of allanite from 28, 482 

— , Descriptions of formations of east 26, 459 

— , Distribution of allanite from 28, 482 

— , Equus scotti and Mylodon from Panhandle region of 24, 117 

— Geological surveys and studies in 25, 164 

— , Llano series of 28, 862 

— , Oil fields of 28, 565, 572, 702 

map of 28, 705 

pools of northern 26, 102 

— Permian, Chelydrosauria from 21, 75 

—, PlsoUtic at San Antonio 26, 398 

— Tertiary sands. Problem of the ; E. T. Dumble 26, 398, 447 

— , West Coffee Creek, Baylor County, Discovery of new genera of Per- 
mian vertebrate in 21, 280 

Thacheb, Emma Tbeadweu^ Land for John Boyd l%acher Park donated 

by 26. 110 

Thacheb Park, John Boyd 26, 110 

TuALATTOSAUBUS, Skull structure of 27, 171 

Than£tian beds of France and Belgium 25, 323 

— equivalent to Torrejon 25, 395 

— time, Reference to fossils of the : 25, 322 

Thaynes limestone. Subdivisions of 27. 70 

Thebmal activity in Yellowstone region, Duration of 22, 108 

" — Springs," by Arnold Hague. Reference to 22, 104 

of Yellowstone Park, Classification and composition of 22, 114 

Thebmometeb, The Geologic 21, 176 

XIX — Bull. Gbol. Soc. Am. 



290 J. STANLEY-BROWN INDEX TO VOLUMES 21 TO 30 

Page 

TiiEBMOMETRY, GooIokIc 21f 32, 783 

TiiEBOPODA ; R. S. Lull 23, 208 

Thick salt and gypsum deposits, Origin of 26, 103. 231-242 

Thiessen, Reinhardt, cited on origin of oil 28, 732 

Thin horizons. Remarkable persistence of 30, 157 

Thomas, II. II., cited on pillow lava 25, 003 

Thomassy, R., Geological work in rx)uiRiana of 25, 172 

Thompson, O. B.. cited on oil fields 28, 088 

origin of oil ^ 28, 730 

Roumanian oil fields 28, 588 

Thomson, James, cited on origin of pillow lavas 25, 638 

prismatic jointing 25, 634 

Thomson, J. A., cited on granite and slate 27, 326 

respiratory organ of amphibians 27, 418 

Thomson. Sir J. J., cited on gas analysis and atomic weight determina- 
tions 26, 191 

Thomson, Sir Wili.iam, cited on measurement of geologic time 28, 749 

Thomson and Tait's Natural Philosophy quote<l on early conditions of 

the earth 26, 177 

Thorkelij^on, Thorkell; "The hot springs of Iceland," Reference to. 22,120 

Thornton. W. M., Jr., Analyses by 27, 211, 230 

Thoroddsen. Th., citetl on physiographic development of Iceland 21, 718 

— ; Lysing Islands, Reference to 22, 129 

Thorold section, Ontario 25, 310 

Thorvaldsen, , cited on atomic weight of lead 28, 849 

Thoulet, J., cited on mechanical analyses of sediments 28, 927 

— , Reference to work of 28, 738 

Thousand Creek Pleistocene fauna 28. 226 

Three Forks, Montana, New facts bearing on the Paleozoic stratigraphy 

of the region about 26, 157 

"Through Valley," Illustration of 22. 179 

Thrust-faults in eastern New York 28, 160 

Th WATTES, T. F., cited on dolomitic ledge in Saint Lawrence 27, 477 

Keweenaw series 27, 94 

Tidewater glaciers of Prince William Sound and Kenai Peninsula, 

Alaska ; U. S. Grant 21, 20, 757 

Tiffany beds. Fossil mammals from the 29, 152 

Tight, William George, Memoir of (with bibliography and portrait), by 

J. A. Bownocker 22, 19 

Till, Characteristics of upi)er portion of lUinoian 20, 76 

— , Mechanical analysis of 25, 692 

— overlying Birds Hill esker gravel and sand 21, 414 

TiLLo, Alexis de, cited on measurement of geological time 28, 770 

Time as measured by uranium minerals 28, 892 

— , Measurements of geologic 28, 884 

— measures in the Niagara (iorge and their api^Iication to (Jreat Lake 

history ; F. B. Taylor 25, I^"> 

— , New table of geologic 28, 884 



TIME TOLMAN 291 

Pag« 
Time scale, European 26, 335 

TiNDiR groups of Alaska 26. 187 

TiTANiPEBors niajaietite, Microstructure of 24, 73, 704 

TiTANOTHEBES froiii Uiuta formation of Utah 26, 144 

— , Phylogeny of the 26, 130, 403 

Titles and abstracts of papers presented in general session and discus- 
sions thereon 26, 58 

— of papers and names of disputants / 21, 20-26 

presented before the combined sections and names of disputants 24, 75 

first section and names of disputants 24, 50 

second section and names of disputants 24, 51 

third section and names of disputants 24, 53, 72 

in general session and names of disputants 24, 49, 70 

TiTTMANN, O. H., cited on floating ice near Muir glacier 21, 368 

records of geodetic surveys of northern Europe 26, 184 

ToDD, J. E., cited on direction of Missouri River flow 27, 29(5 

— , Discussion of origin of mounds by 29, 81 

Pleistocene deposits by 29, 78 

— ; Pre- Wisconsin channels in southeastern South Dakota and north- 
eastern Nebraska 23, 46, 463-470 

— ; South Dakota Geological Survey, Reference to 23, 126 

— and Upham, Warbeiv, cited on glacial lakes Agassiz and Dakota... 21,339 

ToRNEBOHM, A. E., citcd on limestone in Mjosen region 27, 571 

ToBNQUiST, S. L., cited on Ordovicic of Dalarne 27, 604 

— , Reference to "Ofversigt ofver bergbyg-gnaden inom Siljasomrfidet 1 

Dalarne" of 27, 607 

ToLLESTON beach 29, 235 

ToLMAN, C. F., Jr., Bajadas of the Santa Catalina Mountains, Arizona 26, 391 
— , Chairman of the Cordilleran Section, Summer Meeting called to order 

by - 26, 390,395 

— cited on gel molecules .' 29, 599 

types of deposits 28, 921 

— , Discussion of five types of wind erosion by 26, 392 

papers bearing on ore deposition by 26, 403 

— elected as chairman of Section 26, 126 

Fellow 21, 4 

— ; Examples of progressive change in the mineral composition of copper 

ores 26, 394 

— ; Magmatic sulfids 28, 132 

— , Paper of H. E. Gregory on bolsons read by 26, 392 

on wind sculpture yt rock in the Colorado Plateau province 

read by 26, 393 

— , J. C. Ray introduced by 26, 402 

— , Remarks on physiographic control in the Philippines by 26, 396 

the structure of the southern Sierra Nevada by 26, 404 

-^ ; Resistant surfaces developed l)y erosion and deposition in the arid 

and semi-arid regions of Arizona 26, 125 

— , A. F. Rogers Introduced by 26, 395 



292 J.. STANLEY-BROWN INDEX TO VOLUMES 21 TO 30 

rage 
ToLMAN, C. F., Jr., Se<"on(lary sulphide ore enriohment discussed by . . . 26, 394 

— , A. E. Vinson introduced by 26, 402 

— . S. W. Young introduced by '. 26, 393 

ToMLiNSON, C. W. ; Present status of the problem of the orif^in of loess. 29, 73 

ToNOPAH, Nevada, Mineral associations at 23, 70 

Topographic features of the Hudson Valley and the question of post- 
glacial marine waters in the Hudson-Champlain Valley; J, II. 

Stoller 30, 90, 415 

^ Bibliography of 30, 421 

— mapping 30, 110 

— maps. Relief patterns in 22, 120 

Topography, Checkerboard 22, 129. 152 

— of marble 27, 438 

— , Typical fault 22, 125 

fold 22, 126 

ToRNQUiST. A., citetl on metamorphlsm 28, 385 

Toronto, Don and Scarboro beds at 26, 244-248 

River glacial deposits near 25, 205 

"— formation," Name given by T. C. Chamberlin 21, 439 

— , (rlaclal deposits in 25, 71 

Torre, Carlos de ij^. Discoveries of extinct land vertebrate fauna in 

Cuba by 24, 118 

— and Matthews, W. D. ; Megalocnus and other Cuban ground-sloths. 26,152 
ToRREJON fauna compared with other faunas 25, 387 

— formation 26, 382 

ToRREY, J., Jr., Analyses of allanite by 28, 474 

— ; Analysis of Pennsylvania oolites by 25, 707 

— cited on oolites 25, 700-761 

Tourmaline in Alabama I3egmatite 29, 104 

Tower, W. L., cited on chrysomelid beetles 20, 618 

ToYALANft and Ijucerno: their structure and relations to other plateau 

plains of the desert ; Charles R. Kejes 23, 50, 713-718 

— , Ix)cation of 23, 715 

Trachytic perlite from Lone Hill, near San Jos4, California ; G. E. 

Postma 24, 94 

Traquair, R. H., cited on fishes in the Ordovician 27, 393-394 

Old Red Sandstone 27, 384 

— , Reference to *'The bearings of fossil ichthyology on the problem of 

evolution'* by 27, 393 

Traverse group of Michigan 27, 159 

Travertine and siliceous sinter, Vegetation of hot springs the formation 

of 22, 116 

— of Mammoth Hot Springs, Oldest deposit of 22, 108 

Treasurer, Election of 21, 3 ; 22, 3 ; 23, 2 ; 24, 9 ; 

25, 5 ; 26, 11 ; 27, 11 ; 28, 12 ; 29, 11 ; 30, 11 

— , Report of 21, 37 ; 22, 58 ; 23, 40 ; 24, 5 ; 

25,53; 26,8; 27,7; 28,8; 29,7; 30, 7 



TREASURER ^TRIASSIC 293 

Page 

Treasurer of Paleontologlcal Society, Election of 225. 90 ; 23, 81 ; 24, 104 ; 

25, 13;^ ; 26, 146 ; 27, 144 ; 2^, 195 ; 20, 126 ; 30, 147 

.Report of 22,89; 23,80; 24,103; 26,132; 

26. 145 ; 27, 143 ; 28. 194 ; 29, 124 ; 30. 147 
Trechmann, C. T. ; Marine Triassie invertebrate fauna from New Zea- 
land 27, 172 

Tree growth, Effect of climate on 25, 495 

Trelease, Wilijam ; Bearing of the distribution of the existing flora of 

Central America and the Antilles on former land connections 29, 129, 649 

— cited on agaves 29, 635 

TREMATOPsiDiC, Family new 21, 278 

Trcmodoc series 27. 573 

Trenton limestone oil field In Ohio and Indiana 28, 668, 671 

Trefostom ATA, Authorities cited on the morphology of the 26, 350 

— , Communication pores of 26, 356 

— , Function of Acanthoporls of the 26, 363 

— , Intrazooecial spines of the 26, 358 

— morphology. Summary and conclusions 26, 365 

— or Monticuliporoids, Bibliography of 26, 366 

, Studies of the morphology and histology of the ; E. U. Cumings 

and J. J. Galloway 26, 158, 349-374 

— , Cinffulum of the 26, 361 

— , Wall structure of 26, 358 

Tresca, H., cited on experimental geology 29, 178 

Trianout^tion of earth-movements recorded in the beaches 24, 221 

— stations in Sumatra, Displacements of 24, 51, 676 

Triasbic, Acadian 26, 93 

— age. Dikes of central western Virginia of 24, 334 

— and early Jurassic time. Earth movements in 30, 516 

— , Arid period of 27, 181 

— deposits of Japan ; H. Yabe 26. 413 

— floras 30, 515 

— genus Placerias lucaSt Note on 25. 141 

— , History of 27, 629 

— igneous rocks,. Crystallization of 27, 633 

in the vicinity of Gettysburg, Pennsylvania ; George W. Stose 

and J. Volney Lewis 27. 55, 623 

, Texture of 27, 633 

— invertebrate faimas of America and their relations to those of Asia 

and Europe 26, 412 

— limestones of ('allfornia. Fauna of the 25, 155 

— marine invertebrate f aima 27, 172 

invertebrates, Comparison of 26, 413 

— of Brazil 30, 220 

Mexico and Pacific coast 29, 602 

North and South America 29, 607 

— rocks, Dlabasic characters of 27, 630-637 

of Alaska, Correlation of 27, 704 



294 J. STANLEY-BROWN INDEX TO VOLUMES 21 TO 30 

Page 

Triassic rwks of Alaska, General character of 27* 6H7 

; George C. Martin 27, 119, 6«> 

— time, DlBouaslon of 27. 505 

Tbicebatops zofte 25. 356 

Trilobites, Discovery of antenna* and other appendages of Middle Cain- 

hrian 22. 96 

— , Median eye in 27, 146 

— , Some fundamental i)olnts In the classification of 28, 209 

TamiDADE, Geology of SO, 299 

Trinity Bay, Manganese deposits of 25, 73 

Tbinucleus beds of Sweden 25, 286 

Triplccia ortoni beds, Antlwstl Island 21, 713 

Trochonema tricarinatum Billings, Found In Romalne Island 21, 687 

Tboost, Gebabd, Geological work of 25, 160 

— , State Geologist of Tennessee 25, 161 

Tbopidoleptus (Recurrent) fauna In the Watkins Glen-Catatonk folio.. 

21,300 

Tropitid.« of the Upper Triassic of California ; J. P. Smith 29, 162 

Tboxell, E. L. ; An early Pliocene monodactylous horse 27, 151 

— ; An Oklahoma Pleistocene fauna 28, 212 

Tbowbbidge, a. C ; Physiographic studies in the driftless area 26, 76 

Tbue, F. W. ; Marine mammals 23, 85, 197 

Tbumbull, L. W., cited on oil in igneous rocks 28, 593 

TscHEBNYSciiEW, Th., cltcd OH liusslau fauna 27, 77 

Tsin Lino Shan, Structural features of the 26, 405 

Tufas of Lake Lahontan, Origin of the ; J. C. Jones 26, 392 

Tulare Pliocene of Idaho, Fauna of 29, 152 

Tullbero, S. a. T., cited on Ordovlclc of Scania 27, 616 

TuLLY limestone, Stratigraphic relationships of 28, 945 

Tuomey, M., Geological work In Florida of 25, 174 

of 25, 168 

— , State Geologist of South Carolina ' 25, 160 

TuPAiiD osteology and relationships 24, 248 

TuPAiiD.* and of Eocene Lemurs, especially Notharctus, Relationship of 

the; W. K. (iregory ,24, 117, 247-252 

Turkey, Petroleum supply of 28, 614 

Turner, H. W., cited on monzoulte analyses 27, 206 

— , Discussion of California rainfall by 25, 121 

Coast Range glaciatlon by 25, 121 

(ireat Basin deformations by 25, 122 

— , Remarks on pisolites at San Antonio, Texas, by 26, 398 

Turner, T. W., cited on ('alifornia Eocene 29. 282 

Turtles accredited to the Judith River formation, Remarks on the fossil 22, 95 

TuscABOBA deep. The deepest abyss known 21, 200 

Twenhofel, W. H., Acknowledgments to 27, 316 

— ; Autlcostl Island faunas 27, 311-312 

— citeil on correlations of the Median with other formations 25, 292 

fossil zones on Anticosrl Island 27, 312 



• 



TWENHOFEL ULRICH 295 

Page 

TwENHOFEL, W. II., oitcd on genus Vir^niana 27, 311 

Gun River formation on Antioosti Island 27, 312 

— , Discussion of Siluric by 28. 130 

— ; Silver (Mty quartzites : a Kansas metainorphlc area 28, 164, 419 

— and ScHUCHERT, Charles; Ordovioic-Siluric sections of the Miugan 

and Antioosti islands, Gulf of Saint Lawrence.. 21,75,677-716; 27,312 

Twin Mountain House, Dispersion of boulders near 27, 282 

TwiTCHELL, M. W., State Geologist of South Carolina 26, 161 

Two Medicine Glacier, Comparison and extension of 24, 542 

— phase convection of igneous magmas ; F. F. Grout 29, 101 

Tyndall, J., cited on cause of glaciation 30, 557 

experimental geology 29, 178 

Tvpes of loess in the Mississippi Valley ; B. Shimek 27, 82 

North American Paleozoic oolites; F. M. Van Tuyl and H. F. Crooks 

29,102 
Typical section of the Allegheny formation; C. K.Swartz and Harvey 

Bassler 30, 153 

Ty'rannosaurus, Additional characters of 27, 150 

— , Skull of 21, 75 

Tyrbeu^ J. B., cited on beaches of Hudson Bay 29, 227 

Cretaceous strata 26, 36Ji 

Hudson Bay limestones 30, 355 

Ordovician 30, 343 

I*askapoo formation 25, 361 

till overlying Birds Hill esker gravel and sand 21, 414 

Wisconsin glaciation 26, 72 

— , Discussion of geological education of engineers 28, 138 

records of Lake Agassiz and Ontario, Canada, by 28, 146 

— , Glacial lnvesti;?ations in Minnesota in 1911 discussed by 23,46,733 

Cdden, J. A. ; Anticlinal theory as applied to some quicksilver deiwsits 30, 112 

— cited on dust and sand storms in the west 21, 641 

erosion, transi>ortation, and sedimentation jjerformed by the at- 
mosphere 21, 638 

mechanical analyses of sediments 28, 927 

Petrolia oil pool 28, 575 

— ; Flattening of limestone gravel boulders by solution 26, 66 

— ; Mechanical composition of clastic sediments 26. 655 

— , Reference to work on sedimentation by 28, 737 

Uhler, R. R., cited on Sankatay Head sands 30, 608 

Uinta Basin Eocene, Notes and slides of the 23, 88 

— formation, Geology of the 26, 144, 417-420 

of Utah 26, 144 

— Tertiary 26, 417 

Ulrich, B. O., California Meeting of the Paleontological Society called 

to order by 26, 410 



* 



296 J. STANLEY-BROWN INDEX TO VOLUMES 21 TO 30 

Ulbich, E. C, The Cataract discussed by 24, 107 

Chester controversy 27, 15T 

— cited on argillites 30, 552 

classification of geolo$:ic records 27. 524 

Ordovlcic rock 27,570 

correlation by faunas 27, 529. 530 

dlastrophic activity 25, 335 

dolomltized fossils 28, 442, 446 

Falrmount formation 28, 808 

fauna of Mlngan formation 21, 690 

fossil sponges 25, 272 

geologic climates 30, 545, 560 

"infundibular diaphragms** 26, 351 

Kief er sandstone 27, 89 

Little Falls dolomite 27, 589 

migration of a living shell 27, 527 

morphology of Trepostomata 26, 350 

Oklahoma fossils 28, 159 

oolites 25,764 

Ordovlclan-Sllurlan boundary 25. 331 

Ostracoda 27, 538 

Pennsylvania i)eneplaln8 29. 579 

revision of Paleozoic systems 28, 889 

"— *' or "Rawvlsion** 27, 472 

unconformity l)etween new i>erlods 27, 497 

— ; Clinton formation in the Anticostl section 29, 82 

— ; Correlation by displacements of the strand- line and the function and 

proper use of fossils in correlation 27, 451 

problems of Eastport Quadrangle, Maine, discussed by 24, 52 

— ; Criteria of correlation from the point of view of the Invertebrate 

paleontologist 26, 410 

— , Discussion of Alexandrian rocks by 26, 95, 155 

algal and bacterial deposits in the Algonkian mountains of Mon- 
tana by ae, 148 

corrosion conglomerate by 36, 39 

paleontologlc criteria In time relations by 26, 411 

reef-coral fauna of California by 28, 201 

Silurian system of Ontario by 26, 41 

Tennessee shale by 28, 207 

on Ordovlcic-Sllurlc section of the Mlngan and Anticostl islands. . 21, 75 

Permian floras In the western "red beds'* 21, 75 

the symposium "Correlation of the Cretaceous** by 26, 414 

— elected First Vice-President Paleontological Society, 1910 21, 72 

— , Fossils of quartzite at Geneva tentatively determined by 21, 527 

— , Hamilton group of western New York discussed by 26, 113 

— ; Kinderhookian age of the Chattanoogan series 26, 96, 156 

— , Medina of Ontario discussed by 23, 83 

problem 24, 107 



ULRICH UNITED 297 

Page 
TTlrich, E. O. ; New data on the relations of the Ozarklan and Canadian 

systems 24, 51 

— ; Nomenclature, structure, and chisslflcation of the Cremacrinidw . . . 24»109 

— ; On the derivation of Paleozoic faunas 22, 96 

— ; Ostracoda as guide fossils in the Silurian deposits of the Appalach- 
ian region 28, 202 

— ; Ozarklan fauna 23, 84 

— ; Presidential address, "The use of fossils in correlation** by 27, 149 

— quoted on Caney shales of Oklahoma • 23, 458, 459 

diastrophic boundaries 26, 310 

faunas of the Mingan series 21, 693 

the distribution of Graptolite f aimas 22, 236 

— , Reference to views on black shales of 24, 113 

— ; Relations of Paleozoic bryozoa to paleogeography 22, 93, 252 

— , Remarks on corals by 27, 147 

Devonian formations by 27, 160 

marine faunas by 27, 160 

: Mississippian controversy by 27, 158 

"mutations** by 27, 148 

reef deposits by 27, 147 

— ; Revision of the Paleozoic systems 21, 31 ; 22, &% 281-680 

— , Session of Paleontological Society opened by 27, 142 

— and CusHiNo, H. P. ; Age of the "Calciferous** formation of the Mo- 

hawk Valley 21, 30, 780 

Sinclair, \V. J.; Interdependence of stratigraphy and paleontology- 21,73 

17lbicu*s Revision of the Paleozoic systems. Index to 24, 625-668 

Umpijeby, J. B. ; World view of mineral wealth 30, 107 

Unakite, Analysis of 27, 222 

— , Distribution and characteristics of 27, 220 

— first brought from Virginia by Fontaine 27, 196 

— , Origin of 27, 222 

— t5T)e 27,220 

Unconformity, Tamiosoma Zone, California 24, 132 

Underclays of coal, Roots In the 24, 76, 114 

Underground temperatures in the United States; presented without 

manuscript by N. H. Darton 22, 54, 716 

Undertow records. Indications of climate through 20, 83 

Unger, C. W., cited on amphibian footprints 27, 411 

Unoui-ates, Af tonlan mammalian fauna 22, 210 

United States and northern Mexico, Arid provinces of 21, 566 

, Chart of storm belt of . . . . .' 25, 570 

tracks In the 25, 498 

, Clays of the SO, 95 

Coast and Geodetic Survey, Acknowledgment to 21, 339 

, Effect of sun-spot on storminess in 25, 545-549 

Geological Survey, Analyses of rhyolite made by 22, 112 

as a civic Institution during the war ; S. Paige 30, 78 

, Reference to 21, 663, 664, 665 



298 J. STANLEY-BROWN INDEX TO VOLUMES 21 TO 30 

Page 

I'NiTED States Geological Survey, Reference to Held obHervation of 

Yakiitat Bay region by 21, 339 

maps of limestone regions in Tennessee and Virginia. . . . 21, 331 

, Glacial formation in the western 28f 143 

Lake Survey, Survey of Niagara Falls. 1906, by 21, 442 

, Petroleum supply of 28, 610 

, Pillow lavas of 25, 612 

, Records of rainfall in various States of 25, 538 

Units of geological olassiflcation. Suggestions as to definitions of terms 

used in designating 23f 71 

University of California, Summer Meeting of the Geological Society of 

America, 1915, held at the 26, 389 

Chicago, Collection of Permian vertebrates from Texas and Okla- 
homa of the 21, 281 

Oregon, War work of 30, 83 

Washington Meeting, Papers of 26, 169 

, Seattle, Washington, Fifteenth Annual Meeting of the Cordil- 

leran Section at 26, 130 

Upham, Warren ; Birds Hill : an esker near Winnipeg, Manitoba 21, 26, 

407-432 

— cited on Ammonoosuc glacier 27, 288 

Bethlehem moraine 27, 272-273 

calculations of glacial lake shorelines 27, 237 

Carroll moraine 27, 279, 282-283 

Connecticut Valley terraces 25, 222 

glacial geology of Hudson River 28, 292 

glaclation in New Hampshire 27, 264-265, 269-270, 291 

Lake Agassiz 25, 34 

origin of eskers and kaiiies in New Hampshire 21, 418 

Pleistocene 28, 811 

sealevel at stage of greatest glaciation 21, 240 

shoreline of Lake Agassiz 25, 209 

waning ice-sheet 27, 244 

White Mountain Ice-cap 27, 67 

— , Glacial Investigations in Minnesota in 1911 discussed by 23, 46, 734 

— , Letter on records of Lake Agassiz and Ontario, Canada, from 28, 146 

— , Memorial of Newton Horace Winchell by 26, 27 

— ; Moraines and eskers of the last glaclation in the White Mountains 27,265 

-^ quoted on lakes Dakota and Agassiz '. 21, 239 

— , Reference to papers on eskers and kames of 2I, 431 

— and Todd, J. E., cited on glacial lakes Agassiz and Dakota 21, 239 

Uplift and folding areas, Relation to petroleum fields of 29, 87 

— , Glacial lakes of Saginaw Basin In relation to 29, 75 

— of northeastern America, Postglacial 29, 70 

Upper Cambrian and Lower Ordovlclan sediments of Center County, 

Pennsylvania, Origin of 24, 112 

— Carboniferous In southeast New Mexico and western Texas, Notes on 

the 21, 76 



UPPER — ^VAN 



299 



Page 
TAPPER Cayiigan of Maryland ;. T. Poole Maynard 21, 30, 781 

— Cretaoeoufl deiK>sits of Atlantic and Gulf Coastal Plain 27, 154 

floras 30, r>24 

of e(|uatorial America 29, 632 

stnitigrapliy, Paiier by C. H. Sternl)erg l>earing on 26, 149 

time, Climate of 30, .'^25 

— Devonian period, Strand and undertow records of 29, 83 

time. North American continent in 26, 88 

— Laramie beds 25, 325 

— Neocene In the Sarjfent oil fields, California, Faunal relations of the 24, 129 

— Triassic rocks 27. 690 

U-SHAPED valleys. Can they be produced by removal of talus? Alfred C. 

Lane 26, 75 

Uranium and the sun 26, 194 

— minerals, Age points given by 28, 875 

, Analyses of 28, 863-864 

from Texas, List of 28, 870 

Use of criuoid arm in studies of phylogeny ; BI Wood 25, 135 

fossil fishes in correlating strata ; E. B. Branson 28, 716 

** fossils In correlation," Presidential address by E. O. Ulrlch 27,149 

UsiGLio, J., cited on chemical deposition 28, 739 

UssHEB, W. A. E., cited on pillow lava 25, 604 

UssiNG, N. v.. Reference to handbook by 27, 618 

Utah a rchieo logical expedition. Discovery of Nonnezoshl natural bridge 

by 21, 318 

— , Coal-bearing formations In 25, 345 

— , Fossil algie from Green River formation In 27, 159 

— , General map of northeastern 21, 521 

— , Mesaverde formation In 25, 345 

— , Minerals from the ore deposits at Park City 25, 47 

— , Natural bridges of southeastern 21, 317 

— , New light on the geology of the Wasatch Mountains. 21, 517-542 

— . Oolitic sand of Great Salt Lake 21, 645 

— Uinta Basin, Artlodactyls from the Upper Eocene of 29, 153 

formation of 25, 144 

Utica and Frankfort shales of the Mohawk Valley; Rudolf Ruedemann. 

22, 63, 720 

V 

Valentine, E. P., Analyses of allanlte by 28, 486 

Valentine, W., Analyses by 27, 206 

Valley glacier erosion, Features of Iceland 21, 719-723 

Valleys and plains. Eastern Washington 23, 533 

— , Characteristics of hanging 21, 721 

— , Clearwater County, Idaho 23, 532 

Vancouver Island, Marine Ollgocene of 29, 297, 303 

Van Delden Laebne, C. F., quoted on ants and coffee culture 21. 456 



SOO J. STANLEY-BROWK INDEX TO VOLUMES 21 TO 3O 

PiLge 

Van deb Bboek, A., oited on positive electric chances In atomic weights 

of the elements. 26* 190 

Vandergbift, J. J., cited on oil 28, 676 

Van deb Stok, J. P. ; '*T\('o earthquakes in Eurofie and at Batavla/' Ref- 
erence to 21, 375 

Van Hise, C. R., cited on allanite 28, 492 

belt terrane of British Columbia 26,189 

classification of metamorphic rocks 28, 452-454, 457 

Keweenaw series 27, 94, 97 

magmatic assimilation 26, 261 

metamorphism 28, 383 

origin of pillow lavas 26, 638 

pillow lavas 26, 616 

Precambrian geology 28, 861 

schistose character of marble 27, 441 

'Treatise on metamorphism** 21, 630, 649 

— Wisconsin volcanic rocks 26, 253 

— ; Origin of the dells of the Wisconsin, Reference to 22, 145 

— spoke at annual dinner 26, 104 

Van Horn, F. R., Acted as secretary of Third Section 26, 73, 90 

— , Deep boring near McDonald, Pennsylvania, diacussed by 24, 73 

— , Discussion of fomite by 26, 91 

organic origin of some mineral deposits in unaltered Paleozoic 

sediments by 26, 86 

on present and future of natural gas fields in the northern Appa- 
lachians 21, 34 

— ; Local anticlines in the Chagrin shales at Cleveland, Ohio. . 21, 24, 771-773 

— , Minerals from the ore deposits at Park City, Utah 26, 47 

— ; Natural gas at Cleveland, Ohio 26, 102 

— ; A new occurrence of pisanite and some large staurolites from Duck- 
town, Tennessee 24, 54, 686 

— ; Occurrence of a large tourmaline in Alabama pegmatite 20, 104 

silver, copper, and lead ores at the Veta Rica mine, Sierra 'Mo- 

Jada, Coahuila, Mexico 22, 67, 738 

— , Paragenesis of the sseolites discussed by 28, 38, 727 

— , Remarks on Kentucky faulting by 27, 104 

Vakhobnbville sandstone 29, 350 

Van Inqen, Gilbert; Attention called to action of Pennsylvania Rail- 
road requiring permission for geologic work by 22, 91 

— ; Cambrian and Ordovician fauna of southeastern Newfoundland... 26,138 

— cited on Armorican grit 27, 579 

A rthrophycus alleohaniense 27, 542 

Clinton shales 27, 534 

fossil bacteria 28, 246 

Shawangunk of Salinau time 27, 533-534 

Silurian formations in New York 27, 546 

— , N. C. Dale introduced by 26, 73 

— , Discussion of geological reconnaissance in Porto Rico by 26, 114 



VAN VARAN0SAURU8 301 

Page 

Van Inoen, Gilbert, First SecMon, Group B, presided over by 26, 05, 154 

— ; Fossil algie of the Ordovician iron ores of Wabana, Newfoundland 26, 148 

— , A. O. Hayes Introduced by 26, 74 

— ; Organic region of some deposits in unaltered Paleozoic sediments. . . 26, 85 
— presided at afternoon session of Invertebrate and General Paleontol- 
ogy, December 29 27, 153 

— , Reference to articles on Silurian sections by 27, 540 

**The Sbawangunk grit and its facial relationships" of 27, 534 

— , Remarks on corals by 27, 147 

marine faunas by 27, 100 

reef deposits by 27, 147 

— , Sediments of Center County, Pennsylvania, discussed by 24, 112 

— ; The Shawangunk grit and its facial I'elatlonships 22, 55 

—, Vote of thanks to 25, 84 

Van Rensselaeb, Stephen, Reference to 26, 297 

Vant Hofp, J. H., cited on cheaiical deposition 28, 739 

Van*t Hoff's law. Application by Vogt 21, 175 

Van TiTYL, Fbancis M. ; Brec<*i:itlon effects in the Saint Louis limestone 

27,122 

— cited on Chemung fauna 30, 405 

— ; Geology of the area of Paleozoic rocks In the vicinity of Hudson and 

James bays, Canada 28, 171 

— introduced by Stuart Weller 26, 02 

— ; New points in Ordovician and Silurian paleogeography 29, 88 

on the origin of dolomites 26, 02 

— ; Origin of dolomite 26, 00 

— ; Revision of the Misslssippian formations of the upi)er Mississippi 

Valley 29, 93 

— ; Types of North American Paleozoic oolites 29, 102 

— and Moon, R. C. ; Late Mii^sisslpplan organic movements in North 

America 80, 88 

Savage, T. E. ; Greology and stratigraphy of the area of Paleoaoic 

rocks in the vicinity of Hudson and James bays SO, 339 

Vanuxem, Labdneb, cited on Cayuga sandstone 26, 287 

Klrkland limestone 29, 337 

Medina formation. 26, 285, 280, 303 

Niagara formation 25, 287 

Oswego sandstone 26, 287 

Sherburne sandstone 80, 423 

— , Geological work of 26, 100 

— , Influence on James Hall of 26, 300 

— , State Geologist of South Carolina 26, 100 

Van Winckle, K. B. ; Paleontology and stratigraphy of the Porter di- 
vision of the Oligocene In Washington 29, 100 

Van Winkle, W., Water analyses by 29, 598 

Vaquebos formation in California ; W. F. Loel 29, 105 

— of the Santa Monica Mountains of southern California 26, 153 

Vabanosaubus from the Permian of Texas, A mounted skeleton of . . . . 22, 95 



302 J. STANLEY-BROWN INDEX TO VOLUMES 21 TO 30 

VABANOSArBus speoies, a Permiau Pelycosaur; S. W. Willlston 21,74 

Variable eoini)o8ition of nielanoohalcite ; W. F. Hunt and E. H. Kraus. 27,61 

Vabiations in rainfall In California ; W. G. Reed 25, 121 

Vasello, D., cited on Stromboli 28, 255 

Vatnajokull, Iceland, Remnants of ice-cap in 21, 718 

Vauqhan, F. E. ; Evidence in San Gorgonio Pass, Riverside County, of a 

late Pliocene extension of the Gulf of Lower California 29, 164 

Vaughai"?, T. W., Bacterial studies of Great Salt Lake and sea water 

suggested by 26, 58 

— ; Cenozolc history of Central America and the West Indies 29. 138 

— ; Chemical and organic deposits of the sea 28, 163, 207, 933 

— cited on Coastal Plain deposits 29, 583 

condition of submergence 28, 805 

correlation of South American formations 29, 639 

island subsidence 29. 500 

organic deposits 28, 739 

origin of oolites 25. 752 

theory of submerged platforms 27, 46 

— ; Coastal plain investigations conducted by the United States and State 

geological surveys 23, 82 

— ; Continuity of development from the paleontologic standpoint 21, 74 

— ; Coral reefs and reef corals of the southeastern United States, their 

geological history and significance 26, 58 

— , Discussion of Bahama and Florida oolites by 25, 59 

corrosion conglomerate by 25, 39 

— , Funa Futi boring 26, 60 

— ; Geologic history of Central America and the West Indies during 

Cenozoic time 29, 615 

— ; Geological history of the Florida coral-reef tract and comparisons 

with other coral-reef areas 25, 41 

section Isthmus of Panama discussed by 23, 82 

— , Introduction of C. Palmer by 25, 91 

— ; Karl F. Kellerman Introduced by 26, 58 

— , D. F. MacDonald introduced by 23, 82 

— , Member of Auditing Committee 25, 49 

— ; Physical conditions under which organic and chemically precopitated 

limestones are formed 23, 82 

Paleozoic coral reefs were formed 22, 93, 238 

— , Precipitation of calcium carbonate and formation of oolites. Refer- 
ence to 26, 58 

— ; Present status of areal mapping in the Coastal Plain and of the 

paleontologic investigations in the Coastal Plain, Panama, and the 

Windward Islands 28, 205 

— ; Presentation of geologic information for engineering purposes 30, 79 

— ; Some littoral and sublittoral features of the Virgin and Northern 

Leeward Islands and their bearing on the coral-reef problem 27, 41 

— ; Summary of the results of investigations of the Floridian and Ba- 

haman shoal-water corals 27, 154 



VEATCH — ^VERTEBRATES 



303 



Page 
Vkatch, a. C, Geological work in Arkansas of 25. 167 

— piled on Long Island geology 28, 283, 294, 305 

Louisiana underground waters 28, 710-711 

saline domes 28, 580 

the Livingston unconformity 25, 348 

pre-Lance unconformity 25, 328 

Vegas range, Ancient structure of the, Figure of 21, 552 

Venezuela, Petroleum supply of 28, 612 

Ventura County oil fields ; Robert W. Moran 24, 97 

Verbeek, R. D. M., cited on melaphyres 25, 610 

nioldavltes as of meteoritic origin 26, 281 

Vebmejo formation, Flora of the , 25, 331-333 

Vermiijon Creek formation of Ihe 40th parallel survey, Reference to. 21,541 

Vermont, Confplex of alkaline igneous rocks at Cuttlngsville 21,32,785 

— , Distribution of aUanite in 28, 469 

— , Gabbro (with diorite) and diabase of Ascutney Mountain 21, 89 

— , Glacial phenomena in 29, 209 

— , Glaciers in Green Mountains of 28, 134 

— , Natural bridge over Lamoille River 21, 322 

— , Pleistocene deformations near Rutland 28, 165 

— , Pre-Cambrlan unconformity In 25, 39 

— uplift in 29, 188 

Verona iron ore 29, 346 

Vertebrate fauna In the marine Tertiary of ("alifornia ; their signifi- 
cance in determining the age of California Tertiary formations; 

J. C. Merriam 26, 168 

of the Orindan and Siestan formations ; J. C. Merriam 25, 156 

Trlassic limestones at Cow Creek, Shasta County, California ; 

H. C. Bryant 25, 155 

, Red Beds between Wichita Falls, Texas, and I^s Vegas, New Mex- 
ico, In relation to their 24, 52, 679 

— faunal zones of the Pliocene Jacalitos and Etchegoin formations... 27,172 

— faunas, Interpretation of 25, 390-393 

of the Pacific Coast region ; J. C. Merriam 26, 416 

— localities of Florida, Stratlgraphlc relations of the fossil 26, 154 

— Paleontologists (American Society of), Amalgamation with the Pale- 

ontological Society of. 22, 87 

, Formations named and described by 23, 262 

— paleontology, Minutes of sectional meeting on 24, 117 ; 25, 139 

, Organization of section on 24, 107 

, Photography in 21, 75 

, Section of 26, 151 ; 27, 149 

, Symiwslum on the ten years' progress in 23, 85, 155-266 

Vertebrates, Correlation by fossil 27, 515 

— , Diagrammatic view of respiratory-circulatory system of 27, 420 

— , Influence of Silurian-Devonian climates on 27, 40 

— (marine) of western North America compared with those of other 

Trlassic areas 26, 413 



304 j. fitanley-brown index to volumes 21 to 30 

pmb 

Vertebrates, New genera of Permian 21, 75, 250-283 

— of the Pleistocene, Establishment of faunal divisions among the 23, 87 

— , Paleogeographlc significance In Paleozoic strata of land ; S. W. WU- 

liston 22, »4 

— , Problem of correlation by use of 26, 411 

— , Range In typical American formation of land 25, 387 

— , Rise of air-breathing 27. 387 

Vesuvius 26, 376 

— , Review of history of 28, 270 

Veta Mountain, Colorado, Rock streams of 21, 26, 663-676, 764 

, Veta peak also called 21, 665 

— peak, Colorado, Absence of ;;laclated valleys near 21, 665, 666 

, Description of 21, 665, 666 

plates 21, 675-676 

, Rock streams of 21, 6a3-676 

— peaks (north and south), Colorado, Composition of 21, 665, 673 

— Rica mine, Sierra Mojada, Coahulla, Mexico, Occurrence of silver, 

copper, and lead ores at the 22, 67, 738 

Vice-Presidents, Election of 21, 2 ; 22, 2 ; 23, 2 ; 24, 9 ; 

25, 5 ; 26, 11 ; 27, 11 ; 28, 12 ; 29, 11 ; 30, 11 

V1CK8BURG floras of North America 29, 633 

Vinson, A. E. ; interesting changes In the comix)sltion of the Salton Sea 26, 402 

— Introduced by C. F. Tolman, Jr 26, 402 

Virgin Islands, PByslographlc features of 27, 41 

Virginia, Age of dikes of central western 24, 334 

— , Camptonite in 24, 321 

— , Chemical analyses of igneous dike rocks from middle western 24, 331 

— , Composition of allanlte from 28, 481 

— crystalline regions. Association of volcano-sedimeiitary beds with 

slates of 21, 31, 782 

— dikes. Distribution and geologic field relations of the 24, 306 

— , Distribution of allanlte In 28, 475 

— , Formations recognized In central western 24, 305 

— , Granlte-felsophyre in 24, 309 

— , Hypersthene syenite of the Blue Ridge region 26, 82 ; 27, 193 

— Igneous dikes. Contact metamorphlsm not noted in 24, 308 

, Petrologlc relations of rock types to each other 24, 329 

-:-, Mlneraloglcal and textural characters of Igneous dike rocks In 24, 383 

— , Misslsslppian delta In 23, 48, 447-455, 743 

— natural bridge. Description of 21, 327 

— , Nepheline syenite In 24, 314 

— , Olivine diabase in 24, 327 

— , Outline map of 27, 195 

— , Paleozoic deposits of the Piedmont in 29, 127 

— , Quartz-gabbro in 24, 313 

— , Reference to limestone region of Bristol 21, 331 

— , R§sum^ of the geology of middle western 24, 303 

— syenite compared to hypersthene syenite 27, 200 



VIRGINIA WALCOTT 305 

Pate 

Virginia, Teachenite or analcite-basalt in , 24, 318 

ViBLET d'Aoust, T.. cited on metamorphism 28, 378 

VooT, J. H. L., cited on melting point of minerals 29, 185 

precipitation of barium sulphate 21, 109 

— , Die Sililvatsclimelz68ungen, Reference to 21, 152, 175 

Volcanic activity, Water and 24, 573-606 

— gases, Attempt to collect 24, 581, 583 

— bygrometric observations, Brun's 24, 578 

— hypothesis of climatic changes 25, 483 

— islands, Reference by Daly to •. 27, 326 

— mechanism at Stromboli 28, 165 

, Relation of Stromboli to 28, 240 

— observations of Green and Brun, Discussion of 24, 575 

— Plug, Northumberland (New York) 24, 53, 335, 683 

— sand type, Description of 21, 629 

— vents, Mesh-like arrangement of 22, 148 

, — water, Analyses table of Hawaii 24, 592 

Volcano cloud. Explanation of the 24, 577 

Volcanoes, Age as the determinant of character in ; D. C. Curtis 26, 78 

— , Genetic classification of active 21, 23, 708 

— , Hawaiian 21, 22. 767 

— in southern Italy, Saline fumarole deposits of 27, 61 

— of Hawaii, Succession in age of the 23, 747 

southern Italy, Present condition of the; H. S. Washington and 

A. L. Day .• 26, 105, 376-388 

— , Some writers on 24, 574 

— . Tectonic lines in Hawaiian 28, 501 

VoN DEB LiNTH, A. E., clted ou Structure of Alps 29, 175 

Voss, E. L,, cited on aridity of Ceara, Brazil 22, 206 

VuLCANisM and diastrophism, UOle of sedimentation in 26, 138 

V'ulcano, a. Bergeat, G. Ponte, and O. de Fiore cited on solfataric activ- 
ity of 26, 384 

— volcano, Italy 26, 384 

w 

• 

Waagen, Evolutionary relationship of mutations of 27, 148 

— , "Mutations" of 25, 142 

Waagen's theory of mutations. An illustration of 24, 109 

Wabana Iron ores of Newfoundland 25, 74 

— , Newfoundland, Fossil algie of the Ordovician Iron ores of 26, 148 

Wade, W. R., cited on allanlte 28, 467 

Wadswobth, M. E., cited on augite syenites 27, 208 

Keweenaw series 27, 94 

Wailes, B. L. C, Geological work in Mississippi of 25, 170 

Walcott, C. D., Alhertella fauna 28, 209 

— , Brigham quartzite named by 21, 523 

— ; Cambrian of western North America 25, 130 

XX — Bull. Geol. Soc. Am. 



3()(> J. STANLEY-BROWN INDEX TO VOLUMES 21 TO 30 

Page 

Walcott, C. 1)., citeil on Algonkiaii nlgal flora 30, OtW 

Cambrian braehioiKKla • 25» 421-422 

formations in the Wasatdi region 21, 518, 523 

Ceratopyge canailennis in tlie lower G<H>(l8ir formation of British 

Columbia 27,595 

Durness limestone 27, 569 

fishes in tlie stratigraphii* column 27, 392, 393 

geologic time as indicated l>y Paleozoic dejiosits 28, 810, 882. 88:1 

Lipalian era 28, T74 

Llano series of Texas •' 28. 862 

Paleozoic intraformational c<mglomerate 25, 265, 276 

sedimentary rocks as indicating geologic time 28. 815 

— ; Comparison of the Yellowstone Park alga* with Algonklan forms. . 27.156 
— ; Discovery of antennas and other apiiendages of middle Cambrian 

trilobites 22, 96 

— , Discussion of pre-Cambrlan unconformity in Vermont by 25, 40 

— elected President Paleontological Society 24. 104 

Third Vice-President 24, 9 

— ; Fossil medusJB from Cambrian rocks of British Columbia 22, 95 

— ; Fossils of lower limestone of Steep Rock series 23. 46, 723 

— , F. W. True Introduced by 23, 85 

— , Holmes, W. H., and Rizer, H. C, (^omniittee on Powell National 

Park 23, 45 

— ; Middle Cambrian crustaceans from British Columbia 23, 84 

— ; Oi'currence of algal and iTacterial deposits in the Algonkian Moun- 
tains of Montana 26, 148 

— , Ozarkian fauna discussed by 23. 84 

— , Photograph of natural bridge, Big Horn Mountains, Wyoming 21. 331 

Yellowstone natural bridge by 23. 323 

— quoted on the Archaeocyathina* 22, 246 

Virginia natural bridge 21. 327 

— , Reference to fossil discoveries of ; . . 28, 247 

"Preliminary notes on the discoverj- of a vertebrate fauna in 

Ordovician strata" by 27, 393 

— , Secretary Smithsonian Institution, Paleontological Society welcomed 

by 23, 77 

— spoke at annual dinner 26, 104 

— ; Stratigraphlc succession of (he Cambrian faunas in the Rock>' Moun- 
tains of British Columbia 24, 52 

— , Telegram of sympathy sent to 29, 83 

— , "The Cambrian of westeni North America,'' presidential address by 25. 65 

Wales, Pillow lavas of 25, 601 

Walker, F. A., Reference to support given to research by 25, 176 

Walkeb, G. T., cited on climatic changes in India 25, 481 

Walker, Lucian, Maps of Kansas oil fields by 28, 692 

Walker, T. L. ; Temlskamlte, a new nickel arsenide from Ontario 25.76 

Wallace, A. R., cited on armadillos of Brazil 21, 478 

tropical storms 29, 665 



WALLACE WARREN 307 

Page 

Wallace, R. C, cited on dolomite 38, 441 

Ordovician limestone in Manitoba 25, 270 

Waltebshauskn, S. von, cited on Etna 28, 271 

Walther, Johannes, cite<l on ability of minerals to resist decomposi- 
tion 21, 635, 639 

deflative effects in the Grand Canyon 21, 577 

desert processes 27, 179 

geologic climates 30, 553 

graptolite shales 28, 959-960 

Old Red Sandstone 27,39,350,353 

origin of oolites 26, 751 

Sparagmite 27, 571-572 

wind scour in dry regions 21, 581, 584 

— ; Origin and peopling of the deep sea. Reference to 22, 267 

— quoted on sand storms 21, 641 

— , Reference to the worl£ in sedimentaries of 28, 736 

Wamsutta Red Beds of Narragansett series 26, 447 

— volcanoes 26, 462 

Wang, , Northern anthracite coal field discussed by 24, 51 

War geologj'. Review of 30, 165 

— , Physiographic features of western Euroi3e as a factor in the 26, 110 

— time development of the optical Industry ; F. E. Wright 30, 103 

— work by the Deiwrtment of Geology a J the Tnlversity of Oregon; 

W. D. Smith 30, aS 

Warburg, Ema, Reference to study with 27, 604 

Ward, L. F., cited on cycads 26, 300 

fossils from the Jurassic of Wyoming 26, 335 

— , "Petrified forests of Arizona," Reference to 21, 324 

Ward, Rowland, cited on measurement of elephants 26, 407 

Waring, C. A., cited on basin terraces in Oregon 26, 561 

Eocene of Calabasls quadrangle 20, 295 

— ; Geological relations between the Cretaceous and Tertiary of south- 
ern California 26, 152 

— , Remarks on Cowlitz River valley by 27, 174 

Wark diorite and Sutton limestone of Vancouver Island, Canada 26, 82 

Warren, C. H., Analyses of uranium minerals by 28, 863-864 

-^, Analysis of Quincy granite by 26, 466 

— , Arrangement for annual dinner in charge of 21, 28 

— ; Barite deposits of Five Islands, Nova Scotia 21, 33, 786 

— cited on allanite 28, 468 

pre-Cambrlan gabbro 26, 450 

minerals 26, 451 

Quincy granite 26, 464 

riebeckite granite 26, 470 

— and Palache, C. ; Pegmatite in gi^anlte of Quincy, Massachusetts 21, 33, 784 
Powers, S. ; Geology of the Diamond Hill-Cumberland district In 

Rhode Island-Massachusetts 26, 75, 435 

Warren, G. K., cited on course of Missouri River 27, 295 



308 J. STANLEY-BROWN INDEX TO VOLUMES 21 TO 30 

Page 

Warben r^ke, Map of 29. 242 

Wasatch eciulvalent to Spaniaolau aiid Ypreslan 25* 390 

— fauun ooinpared with other launas 25, 387 

— Mountains, Definition of 21, 518 

, Interpretation of the Algonkiau (pinrtzite-slate series of 21,523-526 

, New llglit on the geologj- of the 21, 22, 517-542, 767 

, Provisional correlation, Table of 21, 519 

, Quartzite series of 21, 520 

, Separation of Cambrian from Algonkian in the 21, 520 

, Stratigraphy of 21, 518. 533 

, Structure of 21, 533, 541 

, Summary of geology of 21, 541, 542 

, "Wasatch range proi^er'* part defined of 21, 518 

— planting station. Locality of 21. 532 

— range at Willard, Utah, Generalized section of. Figure showing 21,534 

, Diagrammatic structure section in Ogden canyon of tlie. Figure 

showing 21. 536 

, Iluntsvllle fault in 21. 540 

, Overthrusts in 21. 534-539 

, Quaternary faulting in 21, 541 

, Transverse faults In 21, 5,39 

— region, Algonkian comix>sition of 21, 535 

, Elimination of Ogden quartzite from 21, 526 

, Silurian and Devonian limestones in 21, 527, 528 

Washbi'bne, C. W., cited on capillary movements 28. 714 

structure of oil fields 28. 584 

Washington, H. S., Analyses by 27, 207 

in discussion of alkaline rocks 21. 89 

— cited on akerite from Norway 27, 207, 208 

augite syenites 27, 208, 209 

charnockite rock analyses 27. 218, 219 

Igneous magmas and lava gases 26. 370 

Kilauean rock analysis 27. 54 

— . Descent into Vesuvius crater with Dr. A. Malladra made by 26, 378 

— , John Johnson introduced by 27, 49 

— , George W. Morey Introduced by 27, 50 

— ; Persistence of vents at Strom])oli and its bearing on volcanic mech- 
anism 28. 165, 249 

— quoted on composition of rock from Starks Knob 24, 346 

— , Reference to work of 29, 186 

— ; Saline fumarole deposits of the South Italian volcanoes 27, 61 

— ; Suggestion for mineral nomenclature 23. 51, 729 

— and Day, A. L., Acknowledgment of valuable assistance and courtesies 

received from officials and professors while studying the volcanoes 

of southern Italy 26. 376 

; Present condition of the volcanoes of southern Italy. 26,105,375-388 

Washington, Alaskan earthquake effect on lake Chelan 2I. 342 

— , Coal-bearing Eocene of 25, 121 



WASHINGTON — WATSON 309 

Page 

Washington, Correlation of the Tertiary formations in western 26* 170 

— , Kocene from Cowlitz River > alley 27, 174 

in 29. 89 

of the Cowlitz Valley 26, 136 

— , Evidence of oil in 28, 678 

— , Geologic structure in western 26, 135 

— , Geology of portions of western 26, 397 

— , Lower Miocene of 25, 153 

— , Marine Oligocene of 29, 297, 303 

— , Oligocene of 29, 165 

paleontology and stratigraphy In 29, 166 

— Oregon province Miocene and its relation to that of California nnd 

other Miocene areas ; C. L. Weaver 26, 416 

— , Plains and valleys of eastern 23, 533 

— , Pleistocene of western 26, 131 

— , Pre-Pleistocene geology in the vicinity of Seattle 26, 130 

— , Relation between the Tertiary sedimentaries and lavas In Kittitas 

County 26, 137 

— , Satsop formation of 28, 170 

— , Stratigraphic and faunal relations of the Liintx)ln formation in. . . . 26, 169 

— , Structure of Pierce County coal field of 26. 132 

— , Tertiary paleontology and stratigraphy of southwestern 24. 131 

W^ASHiTA invertebrate fauna 26, 34S 

Water and the "basic minerals" in the volcanic activity of Kilauea. . . 24,602 
volcanic activity ; Arthur L. Day and E. S. Shepherd 24, 573-606 

— as a magmatic constituent 27, 50 

— deposits, Mechanical analyses of 25, 693-712 

— in arid regions, Limitations to geologic work of 21, 571 

— , New classification of natural 24, 73 

— of Hawaiian volcanoes, Origin of 24, 603 

— sediments. Differences l)etween wind and 25, 740 

Waterfall canyon, Locathm of 21, 539 

Waterlimes discussed by A. W. Grabau 28, 174 

Marjorie 0*Connell 28. 174 

M. Y. AVilliams 28, 174 

Waters, Composition of some Atlantic coast connate 21, 774 

Waterville, Maine, Pleistocene geology of 28, 309 

Watkins Glen and its pre-Glacial equivalent 23, 483 

Catatonk quadrangle faunas. Folio 1(59, United States Geological 

Survey, illustrating 21, 287 

Watson, D. M. S., Comments on committee's rei)ort on nomenclature of 

cranial elements 28, 973 

Watson, J. W., and Dinwiddie, J. G. ; Chemical analyses of igneous 

rocks in Virginia 24, 303 

Watson, T. L., Analyses by 27. 641 

— , Analysis of allanlte by 28, 489 

— cited on allanlte 28, 47.") 

comagmatic area near the Blue Ridge 27, 226 



310 J. STANLEY-BROWN INDEX TO VOLUMES 21 TO 30 

Watson, T. L., cited on gabbro 27, 226 

nelsonite 27, 228 

Hemlock area in Floyd County, Virginia 27, 226 

hyperstliene syenite 27, 11>T 

metamorpbism 28, 386 

nelsonite 27, 197 

syenite analyses 27, 211 

titanium-bearing rocks 27, 200 

unakite 27. 220, 221 

— , Memorial of W. M. Fontaine by 28. 6 

— ; Petrology of rutile-bearing rocks 29, 100 

— , Reference to "The occurrence of nickel in Virginia" by 27, 197 

war work of 30, 177 

— , Remarks on organic origin of some mineral deposits in unaltered 

Paleozoic sediments by 26. 86 

— ; Weathering of allanlte 28, 152, 463 

— and CUNE, Justus H. ; Hyperstheue syenite and related rocks of the 

Blue Ridge region, Virginia 27, 193 

; nypersthene syenite (akerlte) of the middle and northern Blue 

Ridge region, Virginia 26, 82 

; Petrology of a series of nepheline syenite, camptonite, monchi- 

quite, and diabase dikes in middle Shenandoah Valley, Virginia. 24,53, 

302-334, 682 

— Powell, S. L. ; Paper on fossils of Quantico slate belt and slates of 

the Virginia crystalline regions 21, 31, 782 

— and Tabor, Stephen ; Igneous complex of high titanium, phosphorus- 

bearing rocks of Amherst-Nelson counties, Virginia 24, 53, 682 

; Nelsonite: a new rock type, its occurrence, association, and com- 
position 21. 33 

, Reference to analysis of syenite 27, 202 

"Geology of the titanium and apatite dei)osits of Virginia" 

of 27, 197, 200 

Weed, W. H., Reference to "The Virginia copper deposits" of 27, 197 

— , I^ney, F. B., and Merrill, G. P., cited on unakite 27, 220 

Watson, W. C, cited on geology of Long Island 28, 281, 295 

Wayan quadrangle, Idaho- Wyoming, Geologic map of 27, 65 

Wealden formation. Age of 26, 338 

— invertebrate fauna 26, 344 

Weathering of allanlte ; T. L. Watson 28, 152, 463 

Weaver, C. E., cited on Cretaceous-Eoc»ene boundary 25, 343 

Oligocene 29, 303 

Tejon fauna 29, 307 

— ; Correlation of the Tertiary formations in western Washington 26, 170 

— , Discussion of Tertiary sedimentaries and lavas by 26, 137 

— elected councilor Cordilleran Section 26, 131 

— ; Eocene of the Cowlitz Valley, Washington 26, 136, 169 ; 27, 174 

— , Faulting in the Great Basin discussed by 26, 139 

— ; Geologic structure in western Washington 26, 135 



WEAVER WELLER 311 

Page 

Weaver, C. E. ; Geology of iwrtious of western Washington 26« 397 

— , Lower Miocene of Washington 25, 153 

— ; Miocene of the Washington-Oregon province and its relation to that 

of California and other Miocene areais 26, 416 

— ; Notes on the pre-Glacial geology of the Puget Sound basin 23, 75 

— ; Paleogeography of the Oligoceue of Washington 29, 165 

— ; Preliminary report on the Tertiary [laleontology and stratigraphy of 

southwestern Washington \ 24, 131 

— ; Pre-Pleistocene geologj' in the vicinity of Seattle 26, 130 

— ; Stratigraphie and faunal relations of the Lincoln formation in Wash- 
ington 26, 169 

Weber, , Gypsum and anhydrite from the lAidwig mine discussed by 24, 94 

Weber, A. H., Discussion of California rainfall by 25, 121 

climatic provinces by 25, 124 

Haywards Rift by 25, 123 

nomenclature by v 25, 125 

Weber, Max, cited on uplifted coral islands •. 29, 558 

— , Reference to "Die Saugetiere" books of 23, 187 

— quartzite. Name and thickness of '. 21, 531 

of Wasatch region, Location and disappearance of 21, 529, 530 

Webster, John, Reference to work of 29, 168 

Weed, W. H., cited on granite analyses ^ 27, 206 

hypersthene syenite 27, 197 

ore deposits 25, 770 

origin of calcareous^ formations about the Mammoth hot springs 21, 645 

stratigraphie relations of Livingston formation 25, 346 

unconformity at base of the Livingston 25, 346 

— ; Formation of travertine and siliceous sinter by the vegetation of hot 

springs. Reference to . ^ 22, 116 

— and Watson, T. L., Reference to "The Virginia coi)per deposits" by. 27, 197 

Weeks, F. B., cited on "Ogden" and •'Brigham'' quartzite 21, 526 

Paleozoic rocks and Carboniferous phosphate dei>osits of the 

Wasatch region 21, 518 

— , name "Morgan formation'* given by * 21, 529 

— , Ordovician fossils found in quartzite at Geneva by 21, 527 

Weoner, T. H., cited on Stromboli 28, 255 

Weidman, Samuel, cited on Cambrian sandstones at Ablemans, Wiscon- 
sin 27, 459 

dolomitic ledge in Saint Lawrence 27, 477 

pillow lavas 25, 616 

— ; Pleistocene succession in Wisconsin 24, 71 

Well near McDonald, Pennsylvania, r.*o(»ation and depth of very deep. 24, 275 

— records, Ontario 23, 375 

Welland Canal intake (Port Colborne), Table of levels, 18.M-1912. at. 24,226 
Welij:r, Stuart; Are the fossils of dolomites indicative of shallow, highly 

saline, and warm seas? 22, 93, 227 

— cited on Amsden fossils 29, 314 

Cypress sandstone 27, 157 



312 J- STANLEY-BROWN — INDEX TO VOLUMES 21 TO 30 

Welleb, Stuart, cited on Okaw and Clore formations 27. 156 

Silurian formations in New Jersey 27, 54H 

— ; Former extension of the Devonian formations in southeastern Mis- 
souri 27, 160 

— ; Genera of Mississippian loop-bearing brachiopoda 22, 92 

— ; Internal characters of some Mississippian rhynchonellold shells... 21,76, 

49S-516 

— , Remark on Devonian formations by 27, 160 

— , Remarks on Mississippian controversy by 27. 158 

— ; Revision of the Mississippian formations of the upper Mississippian 

Valley 29. 93 

— ; Stratigraphic and faunal succession of the Chester group in Illinois 

and Kentucky 27, 156 

— , F. M. Van Tuyl introduced by 26. 62 

— and Mehl, M. G. ; Western extension of some Paleozoic faunas in 

southeastern Missouri 25, 135 

Stanton, T. W* Auditors appointed for the Paleontological Society 22. 89 

Wells, J. W., cited on ant-eaters of Brasil 21. 477 

Wells, R. C, cited on solubility of calcite 28, 935 

Wells (flowing) on anticlines 21, 24, 770 

Were the gra])tolite-bearing shales, as a rule, deep or shallow water de- 

I)osits? A. W. Grabau and Marjorle O'Connell 28. 205, 959 

Werner, A. (»., cited on geologic chronology 27. 491 

layer deposits from primeval sea 27, 177 

West India Islands, Petroleum supply of 28. 611 

West Indies, Cenoasoic geology of 29, 615 

history of 29, 138 

, Flora of the 29, 649 

, Mesozoic history of 29, 138, 601 

, New batliymetrical map of 29, 142 

, Poleozoic history of 29, 129 

West Palm Beach, Florida, Sand from Piedmont region of the north at 

21,636 

West Virginia, Coal beds in 29, 96 

, Burning springs, volcano antlUne in 21, 23, 769 

, Deepest boring in 25, 48 

. Oil development in 28, 623 

fields of : 28, 561,1*63 

Western extension of some Paleossoic faunas in southeastern Missouri ; 

S. Weller and M. G. Mehl 25. 135 

— fuel section of United States Geological Survey, Reference to 25, 349 

— Virginia, Igneous dikes in central • 24. 302-334 

Westgate, L. G., Acting secretary first section 24. 70 

— , Acknowledgments to 28, 349 

— and Branson, E. B. ; Cenozoic history of the Wind River Mountains, 

Wyoming 23, 49, 739 

Weston, Thomas Chesmer, Memoir of 22, 32 

Westqvage beach, Rhode Island, Beach cusps at 2I, 623 



WETHERED WHITE 



313 



Wethered, BL B., cited on origin of oolites 25, T49 

pisolitic granules, near Weymouth, England 21, 646 

set^ondary enlargement of quartz grains 21, 649 

— quoted on Caraliyba rock of Bahia 22, 190 

— , Reference to pai)er on formation of oolite 21, 646 

Wharton, W. J., cited on lagoon floras 29, 553 

Wheeucb, Mrs. H. I., Acknowledgments to 25, 123 

Wheeler, W. C, Analysis of sea deposits by 28, 937, 940, 942 

— cited on ants* antecedents 28, 243 

marine sediments 28, 739 

Wherry, E. T., cited on allanite 28, 471 

Silurian formation in New Jersey ' 27, 548 

— , Delta deposits discussed by 23, 48, 745 

— r, Discussion on geologic thermometry 21, 32 

— ; Precambrian sedimentary rocks In the highlands of eastern Penn- 
sylvania 28, 156 ; 29, 375 

Whetstone Gulf and its pre-Glacial valley 23, 484 

Whippix, a. W., Reference to surveys in Texas by 25, 165 

Whipple, C. L., cited on pillow lavas 25, 623 

Whirlpool drift, (Correlation Scarboro Heights with 21, 438 

— Saint Davids canyon. Section of drift in 21, 43<> 

gorge. Neighboring drift deposits 21, 437 

. Niagara River, Features of 21, 434 

, Pleistocene deposits of 21, 43.' 

valley, Niagara River, Studies of 21, 433 

White, A. D., Reference to "Warfare of science and religion" by 28. 247 

White, C. A., cited on Bear River fauna 26, 346 

Colorado invertebrate fauna 25, 327 

Dakota fauna 26, 347 

geologic time scale 25, 336 

invertebrate fauna of the Morrison 26, 343 

Permo-Triassic fossils 30, 489 

the origin of the Morrison formation 26, 318 

— ; Paleontology of Brazil, Reference to 22, 191 

White, David ; Characters of CaJamites inornatus Dawson 23, 88 

— cited on Gay Head strata • 30, 608 

(California Eocene 29, 283 

geologic climates 30, 501 

organic deposits 28, 740 

origin of oil : 28, 639, 732 

oil distribution 28, 649 

Supai fauna 30, 492 

— , Correlation of Paleozoic faunas discussed by 23, 83 

problems of Eastport quadrangle, Maine, discussed by 24, 52 

— , Delta deposits discussed by 23, 48, 744 

— , Discussion of corrosion conglomerate by 25, 39 

Hamilton group of western New York by 26, 113 

symposium papers by 25, 130 



5 



314 J- STANLEY-BROWN — INDEX TO VOLUMES 21 TO 30 

' Page 

White, David, Discussion on microscopic study of certain coals in rela- 
tion to the sapropelic hypothesis 21, 33 

— elected Second Vice-President Geological Society for 1912 23, 2 

Third Vice-President Paleoutological Society 21, 71 

— ; Gigantopteris Schenck, its character and occurrence In America . . . 22, 91 

— , Introduction of E. C. Jeffrey by 26, 58 

— ; Latest theories regarding the origin of oil 28, 157, 727 

— , Permian floras in the western "red beds** 21. 75 

; Pottsville-Allegheny boundary in the interior province (Illinois 

and Missouri coal fields) 24, 75, 716 

— ; Regional alteration of oil shales 26, 101 

— ; Regional devolatilization of coal 21, 33, 788 

— . Relation of vertebrate fauna in Red Beds between Wichita Falls, 

Texas, and Las Vegas, New Mexico, discussed by 24, 52 

— ; Relation between the Paleozoic floras of North and South America 20, 129 

— ; Resins in Paleozoic coals 23, 37, 728 

— ; Roots in the underclays of coal 24, 76, 114, 719 

— , Second section under chairmanship of Vice-President 24, 51 

— . Shinarump conglomerate discussed by 24, 52 

— . Unconformity at the base of the Berea sandstone in Ohio discussed 

by 26, 96, 155 

— : Value of floral evidence in marine strata as evidence of nearness of 

shores 22, 93, 221 

— and Stanton, T. W. ; Paleontologic evidences of climate 21, 73 

White, I. C, Berea equivalent to Corry sandstone of 26, 210 

— , Chairman of third section, Vice-President 24. 53, 72 

— cited on Coal Measure section of Maryland 30, 582 

oil anticlines 28, 626 

sands 28, 597 

petroleum 28. 555 

red and gray sandstone 27, 181 

tillites in southern Brazil 27, 185 

— ; Deepest boring in West Virginia 25, 48 

— . Discussion of crustal movements in Lake Erie region by 26, 66 

Hamilton group of western New York by 26, 113 

Healdton oil field by • 28, 159 

origin of sediments and coloring matter of the eastern Oklahoma 

Red Beds by 23, 36, 724 

on Burning springs, vojcano anticline, in West Virginia 21, 23, 769 

Permo-carbonic conglomerates of south Brazil 21, 30, 779 

— elected First Vice-President Geological Society for 1912 23, 2 

— ; Gulf coast petroleum fields of Mexico between the Tamesi and Tux- 
pan rivers 24. 73, 253-273, 706 

— , Memorial of Thomas M. Jackson by 24. 48 ; 26. 13 

— , Northumberland (New York) Volcanic Plug discussed by 24.54,683 

— ; Note on a very deep boring from near McDonald, Pennsylvania 24, 73, 

275-280 
— , Permian glaciation in Brazil discussed by 21, 31 



WHITB WIELAND 315 

Page 
White, I. C. ; Practical application of geological structure tlieories to oil 

recovery 22, li>7 

— ; Records of three very deep wells drilled in the Appalachian oil fields 

of Pennsylvania and West Virginia 29, 96 

— , Roots in the underclays of coal discussed by 24, 76 

— ; Some definite correlations of West Virginia coal beds iu Mingo 
County, West Virginia, with those of Ijetcher County, southeast- 
ern Kentucky 28, 90 

White, W. P, Diopside and its relations to calcium and magnesium 

metasilicates, Reference to 21, 166 

— , Melting-point determination and methods, Reference to 21, 159 

White Mountains, Glaciation in 27, 67, 265 ; 28, 136, 543 

, New England uplift in 27, 108 

of New Hampshire, Glaciation in 27, 2a'} 

, Physiography of 27, 108 

— Pine range, Geologic cross-section of the. Figure showing 21, 551 

— shales of the Coalinga district. Fauna and relations of the 26, 168 

WniTEAVES, J. F., cited on a Richmondiau fauna from Stony Mountain, 

Manitoba 21, 700 

fossils from Hamilton Bay 27, 707 

— , Reference to "Notes on some Jurassic fossils collected by G. M. Daw- 
son in the Coast Range of British Columbia" of 27, 716 

"On some fossils from the Triassic rocks of British Columbia" 

by 27, 707, 708, 714-716 

Whitehead, W. L., cited on riebeckite granite 25, 470 

WiiiTEMANS Pass, Section in the vicinity of 29, 145 

Whitfield, J. E., Analyses by 27, 233 

— cited on Calosinra planoconvcxa 27, 313 

Whitfield, R. P., Memoir of 22, 22 

— on Committee on Geological Magazine 21, 743 

Whitley, N., cited on pillow lava 26, 604 

Whitlock, H. p., cited on allanite 28, 471 

Whitney, J. D.. cited on California Eocene 20, 282 

Keweenaw series 27, 94 

making of the Sierra Nevada Mountains 27, 508 

the minerals of Wisconsin 29, 393 

Shastan series 27, 509 

— , Rejwrt on iron ore of Lake Superior region 23, 317 

Whittlesey, Chari^s; Iron ores of Lake Superior result of segrega- 
tion 23, 320 

Whittlesey Lake, Map of 29, 242 

Wichita Falls, Texas, and Las Vegas, New Mexico, Relation of verte- 
brate fauna in Red Beds between 24, 52, 679 

WicHMAN, A., cited on atolls 29. 527 

Wieland, G. R., cite<l on Mesozolc fossils 29, 601 

Mexican fossils 29, 610 

oolites 25, 760-761 

— ; Co4yledonary node of Cycadeoidea 22, 91 



316 J- STANLEY-BROWN — INDEX TO VOLUMES 21 TO 30 

Page 
WiELAND, G. R., Discussion of algal and bacterial deposits in the Algon- 

kiau Mountains of Montana by 26, 148 

fish fauna of Eigbteen-mile Creek, New York, by 26, 154 

— elected Second Vice-President Paleontological Society '. . 24, 104 

— ; Exhibition of polished Npeciniens of Ozarkian stroma toporoids from 

Pennsylvania 24, 115 

— ; Floral features of the Cycadeoideie 24, 115 

— ; Origin of the Liassic flora of the Mixteca Alta 24, 115 

— , Sediments of Center County, Pennsylvania, discussed by 24, 112 

— ; Wood structure of the Cycadeoidea? 24, 115 

WiLCKBNS, Otto, cited on Patagonian fossils 28, 645 

Tertiary floras 20, 634 

Wilcox Ek>cene flora of North America 29, 632 

— formation 25, 330 

, Flora of the 25, 332, 333 

Wilcox, G. A., Discussion of Haywards Rift by 25, 123 

WiLDEB, F. A., cited on valley of preglacial Little Missouri 27, 301 

Wilkes, Lieut. Charles, Reference to his Antarctic expedition 21,28 

Wilkes Exi)edition, Reference to fossils collected by 25, 162 

WiLKiE, , of Palo Alto, California, Tourmalines, benitoites, etcetera, 

exhibited by 23, 75 

W1LKIN8, D. F. H., Occurrence of interglacial beds in Canada, first an- 
nounced by 21, 435 

WiLLABD thrust, Ogden canyon, Description of 21, 536 

WiLLABD, Utah, Section of Wasatch range at 21, 534 

Williams, E. H., cited on Clarendon gravels 25, 217, 218 

distribution of copper in glacial deposits 25, 213 

WiLUAMs, G. H., cited on allauite 28, 466 

gabbro 27,230 

origin of pillow lavas 25, 637 

pyroxenite ; 27, 233 

spheroidal greenstone scthists 25, 613 

websterite 27, 233 

WiixiAMs, H. E., quoted on limestone bluffs near Rio Salitre Falls, 

Bahia 22, 194 

Williams, H. S., cited on duration of Glacial period 28, 812 

Ithaca beds 30, 445 

Splrifer Icevis SO, 442 

the Ordovician and Cambrian 28, 882 

— , Correlation of the Paleozoic faunas of the East|X)rt quadrangle, 

Maine 23, 83, 349-352 

problem suggested by study of the faunas of the Eastport quad- 
rangle, Maine 24, 52, 377-397 

— elected First Vice-President Paleontological Society 24, 104 

— , Memorial of 30, 47 

— ; Migration and the shifting of Devonian faunas 21, 76, 285-294 

— on committee Cincinnati meeting, 1881 21, 742 

— , Paleontology of a voracious appetite discussed by 23, 83 



WILLIAMS WILLIS 317 

Page 
WiLiJAMS, H. S. ; Persistence of fluctuating variations as illustrated by 

the fossil genus Rhipldomella 21, 76. 296-312 

— and HodXicK, Arthur ; Migration 21, 73 

— , Tarr, S. R., and Kindtjc, £. M. ; Geologic atlas of the United States, 

Watklns Glen-Catatonk folio (fleld edition), Ueference to 22, 152 

Williams, I. A. ; Oregon Bureau of Mines and Geology 26, 137 

Williams, M. Y., Acknowledgments to 28, 330 

— , The Cataract discussed by 24, 107 

— cited on Cabots Head section, Ontario 25, 310 

Clinton formation 25, 279 

coral fauna 27, 478 

Manitowaiilng section, Ontario 26, 320 

marine Clinton beds 29, 334 

Niagara of Ontario 30, 368 

Ordovician limestones 30, 348 

— , Discussion of classification of aqueous habitats by 26, 158 

Hamilton group of western New York by 26, 113 

I/Ockport-Guelph section by 28, 173 

Paleozoic rocks by 28, 171 

Siluric by 28, 129 

— ; Guelph formation of Ontario 27, 148 

— , Photographs by [plate 14] 25, 287 

— , Reference to photograph of Silurian sequence in Ontario 28, 806 

— , Remarks on waterlimes by 28, 174 

— ; Sections illustrating the lower part of the Silurian system of south- 
western Ontario 25, 40 

Williamson, B. D., cited on solubility — product constant 28, 935-936 

WiLUAMSoN division of the New York Clinton, Reference to 21, 715 

— shale 29, 348 

WiixiARD, T. E., Dr. Ulrich accompanied to Big Stone Gap by 27, 479 

Wilms, Bailey, cited on experimental geology 29, 175 

geologic climates SO, 559 

monoclines 27, 91 

Pennsylvania peneplains 29, 579 

red color of the Triasslc 28, 760 

stratigraphy 28, 807, 809 

unconformity of San Lorenzo beds 29, 299 

epigene profiles of the desert by 26, 391 

— , Discussion of paleontologic criteria in time relations by 26, 411 

on flow of diabase 21, 24 

Permo-carbonic conglomerates of south Brazil 21. 30, 779 

the geology of the Wasatch Mountains by 21, 22 

volcanic action 21, 23 

— quoted on tangential crustal movements in Asia 21, 225 

the "Stratigraphy and structure of the Lewis and Livingston 

ranges" 23, 690 

— , Reference to geologic map by 29, 69, 601 



818 J- STANLEY-BROWN INDEX TO VOLUMES 21 TO 30 

Page 

Wiixis, Bailey, Kefereiice to his "Stratiprraphy and structure of Lewis 

and Livingston ranges, Montana'* 24. 5:^3 

symposium of outlines of geologic history, with especial refer- 
ence to North America of 22, 246 

work on sedimentarles by 28, 738 

— ; Structure of the Pacific ranges, California SO, 84 

— , Blackwelder, E., and Sargent, R. IL, Reference to their researches 

in China 21, 639 

Willis, John, Fossil locality at ranch-house of 25, 357 

WiLLiSTON, S. W. ; Cacops, Pesmospondylus ; New genera of Permian . . . 

21, 250-283 

— cited on age of oolitic shale ! 28, 587 

f aunal relations of the Morrison 26, 299 

Mflpstrictien stage 25, 321 

vertebrates 27, 88 

— ; Classification and phylogeny of the reptilia 28, 716 

— , Comments on committee's report on nomenclature of cranial ele- 
ments 28, 973 

— ; Comparison of Sundance with Oxford clay formation by 28, 259 

— ; Complete skeleton of a new group of large reptiles from the Permian 

of New Mexico 22, 95 

— , Discussion on the structure of the Sauropod dinosaurs 21, 74 

— elected Second Vice-President Paleontological Society, 1910 21, 72 

— ; Evolution of vertebrte 28, 146 

— ; Evolutionary evidence 23, 86, 257 

— , Memorial of 30, 66 

— ; Mounted skeleton of Varanosaurus from the Permian of Texas 22, 95 

— ; New genus of Permian reptile 21, 75, 250-2&3 

— ; Origin of the sternum in the reptiles and mammals 27, 152 

— ; Paleogeographic significance of land vertebrates in Paleozoic strata. 22.94 

— ; Paleontology of man 21, 74 

— ; Principal character of the Chelydrosauria, a suborder of Temno- 

spondyte Amphibians from the Texas Permian 21, 75 

— , Reference to model described by 25, 143 

— ; Relationships of the Mesozoic reptiles of North and South America 28, 138 

— , Remarks on policy of Vertebrate Section by 27, 153 

— ; Varanosaurus species, a Permian Pelycosaur 21, 74 

— and MooDiE, Roy L. ; New Pleisiosaurian genus from the Niobrara 

Cretaceous of Nebraska 24, 120 

Wir>LMOTT, A. B., Bibliography of 27, 38 

— cited on elliptical greenstone schists 25, 612 

pillow lavas 25, 616 

— , Death of 26. 5 

— , Memorial of 27, 37 

— , Photograph of 27, 37 

Wilson, A. W. G., Reference to paper on "Cuspate forelands along the 

bay of Quinte" of 21, 603 

— , Theory of formation of beach cusps 21, 618 



WILSON WINCHELL 319 

Page 
Wilson, A. W. G. ; Trent River system and Saint Lawrence outlet, Ref- 

eren(« to 22, ino 

Wilson, H. E., Remarks on marine faunas by 27, 160 

Wilson, Mobijcy E., cited on geological survey party 27, 187 

pegmatite 28, 857 

— ; Subprovincial limitations of Precambrian nomenclature in the Saint 

Lawrence basin 29, 90 

Wilson, W. J., cited on Ontario fossils 30, 355 

Ordoviclan 30, 343 

Wilsonia grosvenori (Hall), Figure showing and description of 21, 511 

— Kayser 21, 510 

WiMAN, Cabl, cited on basal limestone of Skattungbyn 27, 608 

graptolite shales : 28, 959-960 

Ordovlcian in jamtland *. . 27, 608 

— cited on "Ueber die Silurformation in Jilmtland" by 27, 608 

— , Reference to study with 27, 604 

studies at Oedegarden with 27, 592 

— , Studies of Lake Venern country made by 27, 586 

WiNCHELL, Alexandeb, Chairman of meeting to discuss question of or- 
ganizing geological society 21. 743 

— cited on oil formations 28, 555 

— ; The diagonal system in the physical features of Michigan, Reference 

to 22, 140 

— , Reference to sketch of Society prepared by 21, 741 

WiNCHEix, A. N., Acknowledgments to 28, 421, 424, 426 

— , J. Howard Mathews introduced by 23, 51 

— . Memoir of Auguste Mlchel-L^vy by 23, 32 

— ; Progress of opinion as to the origin of the iron ores of the Lake 

Superior region 23, 51, 329-332 

— ; Saponite, thalite, greenalite, and greenstone 23, 51, 329-332 

WiNCHELL, N. H., Bibliography of 26, 31 

— cited on anorthoslte 29, 409 

effects of wind scour In the Dakotas 21, 584 

ellipsoidal greenstone 25, 613-614 

origin of eskers 21, 418 

pillow lavas 26, 637 

pillow lavas 25, 619 

processes of drift transportation and deposition 21, 430 

— ; Delaware terraces 25, 86 

— , Discussion of Glacier Bay topography by 25, 89 

Intraformatlonal corrugation 25, 37 

Ontario glaclatlon by 25, 72 

— , Memorial of 26, 27 

— on committee Cincinnati meeting, 1881 21, 742 

— , Photograph of 26, 27 

— . Reference to speech at dinner by 25, 80 

— ; Review of the formation of geological societies In the United States 25, 27 



320 J- STANLEY-BROWN INDEX TO VOLUMES 21 TO 30 

WiNCHEiJ^ N. IL, aud Hitchcock, C. H., Call published in American 

Geologist, June, 1888, by 21, 745 

WmcHELL's "diagonal sj'stem," Reference to 22, 150 

Winchester, D. E., cited on Cannonball formation 25. 339 

geology of Indian reservations 25, 350 

Wind deposits, Mechanical analyses of 25, 713-726 

— , Influence on the oil-bearing roclcs of 24, 94 

— River and Big Horn basins, Eocene and Oligocene of 22, 63, 722 

Mountains, Amsden formation of 29, 309 

, Rock slides in 28, 347 

, Wyoming, Cenozoic history of 28. 40, 739 

— scour and its effects. Various authorities cited on 22, 693 

, Arid region of the Southwest 23, 717 

— sculpturtng of rock in the Colorado Plateau province 26, 393 

— sediments, Differences between water and 25, 740 

WiNDHAUSEN, A., ctted on Patagonlan fossils 29, 645 

San Jorge formation 29, 644 

WiNDLE, , cited on anatomy of horse and tapir 25, 406 

Winds in arid regions, Effect of 21, 573, 574 

Windward Islands, Mapping and paleontologic investigation of 28, 205 

Winnipeg, Manitoba, Birds Hill : an esker near 21, 26, 407-432 

WiNTRiNGHAM, J. P., Dlscussiou of eflTectH of pressure on rocks and min- 
erals by 26. 84 

Wisconsin, Alexandrian rocks of 27, 305 

eastern 26, 95, 155 

— , Cambrian sandstones at Ablemans 27, 459 

— , Discovery of fluorlte in 29, 104 

— drift and loess, Des Moines section 23, 712 

— , Minerals in 29, 393 

— , Pleistocene succession in 24, 71 

— (Pre-) glacial drift in the region of Glacier Park, Montana. 24,71,529-572 
ice invasion, Occurrence of 21, 752 

— stage of glaciation and the third set of plains 24, 535 

— time, Uplift in 29, 201 

Witter, F. M., Fragment of a molar of Elephas prinUgenius obtained by 

21. 139 

WoLcoTT furnace iron ore 29, 348 

Wolf, Rudolf, Comparison of sun-spots and hurricanes by 25, 494 

Wolf, T., cited on Loja Basin fossils 29, 640 

WoLFER*s sun-spot numbers. Reference to 26, 485 

Wolff, F. von, cited on metamorphism 28, 406 

pillow structure 25, 636 

Wolff, J. E., cited on allanlte 28, 467 

tilllte and slate 27. Ill 

— , Discussion on the complex of alkaline igneous rocks 21, 32, 785 

— , Experimental geology discussed by 24, 49 

— , Index-Ellipsoid In petrographic-microscopic work discussed by 24, 53 

— , Northumberland (New York) VolcaniL* Plug discussed by 24. 54 



WOLFF WOOD WORTH 321 

PnRO 

Wolff, J. E., Sidney Powers introduced by 27, 109 

— , Remarks on effects of pressure on rocks and minerals 26, 84 

• — foliation of New Jersey rocks by 27, 58 

■ mineral hydroxijies by 27, 61 

— , Statement of work on sulphides by 26, 394 

Wood, Elvira ; Phylogony of certain Ceritliiidjc 21, 76 

-, Use of crlnoid arms in studies of phylojjeny 25, 135 

W(X)D, H. O. ; California earthquakes- a synthetic study of the recorded 

shocks 21, 791 

— cited on Hawaiian volcanoes 28, 508 

— introduced by A. C. Lawson 26, 404 

— : Possible causal mechanism for heave fault-slipping in the California 

Coast Range region 26, 404 

— structure of the Cycadeoidejx* ; G. R. Wieland 24, 115 

Woodford, C. M., cited on atolls 29. 559 

WooDRX^FF, L. L., Thanks rendi»red to 27, 387 

Woods Hole, Massachusetts, Submarine rhamaH-yparis Iwg and its rela- 
tion to the problem of coastal su!)sidence at 24, 72, 699 

Woodward, A. S., cited on acanthodians 27, 402 

specimen of Stegosauria in Woodwardian Museum, Cambridge 26,332 

— , Reference to "Catalogue of fossil fishes" by 27, 394 

Woodward, Henry, elected honorary member of Paleoutological Society 25. 134 

Woodward, R. S., cited on the form and position of the sealevel 21, 240 

— , Remarks on natural i;ns at (Cleveland, Ohio, bv 26, 103 

WoODWORTH, J. R., Reginnin'js of I^akc A'ImssIz d's -ussed b.' 24, 71 

— ; Boulder be<ls of the Caney shale at Taliliina. Oklahoma... 23,50,4,57-462 

— cited on beaches of Keescville water level 27, 664 

Blackstone series 25, 444-44.^» 

chart of glacial lakes 27, 609 

chlorine in ground water 29, 474 

Diamond Hill quartz deposits 25, 471 

geology of Tjong Island 28, 282. 2S3, 2S7, 30.3 

— glaclation In Brazil 25, 31 

Hawaiian Islands 28, 50.3, ,504 

ice crystals 30, 426 

Port Kent section, New York 28. 332 

post-Glacial deformation 27, 66S 

tlllites in southern Brazil 27. IS.') 

Wamsutta volcanoes 25, 462 

— , Coastal marshes south of Cape Cod discussed by 23, 50, 742 

— , Covey Hill revisited discussed by 23, 36, 722 

— , Deformation of the Algonquin Beach discussed by 24, 71 

— elected Councilor 21, .3 

— . Glacial cirques discussed by 24, 51. 678 

— , lowan drift discussed by 24, 71 

— ; Memoir of Ral]>h Stockiiuin Tjirr 24, 29 

— , New light on tlip Kowccnnwrni fault cls'u-sed t)v 24, 76 

— : Permo-carbonic conirlonicratcs; of south Brnzil 21, ,30. 779 

XXI — Bull. r.mL. iiar. Am. 



322 J- STANLEY-BROWN INDEX TO VOLUMES 21 TO 3O 

WooDWOBTH, J. B. ; roHt-Cfljuinl faults of eastern New York 22, 165 

— quoted on "Starks Knob" 24,336 

— , Reference to **Ancient water levels of the Chaniplain and Hudson 

valleys" of 27, 669 

— , Remarks on banded shales 1)3* 27, 114 

geological education of engineers by 28, 138 

— , Roots in the underclays of coal discussed by 24, 76 

— . Robert W. Sayles introduced by 27, HO 

— , Structure of the Helderberg Front discussed by 23, 50» 747 

— , Work in the Diamond Hill-Cumberland district by 26, 438-441 

WoECESTEB, Dean, cited on Philippine Islands 28, 535 

WoBLD view of mineral wealth ; J. B. Umpleby 30, 107 

Worth, R. H., cited on English Channel deposits 28, 738 

WoBTHEX, A. H., cited on Lower Chester sandstone 27, 157 

Wright, Charles Wiix, elected Fellow 21, 4 

Wright, F. E., Change in the ( rj'stallographical and optical properties 

of quartz with rise in temperature 25, 44 

— cited on coarsening of finely divided silicates by heat 29. 182 

— ; Crystals and crystal forces 27, 62 

— , Discussion on the complex of alkaline igneous rocks 21, 32 

volcanic action 21, 23 

— ; Experimental geology 24, 49, 671 

— ; Geologic thermometry 21, 32, 783 

— ; Granularity limits in petrographic-mlcroscopic work 23, 37, 726 

— ; The Index-Ellipsoid in petrographic-mlcroscopic work 24, 53, 681 

— ; Obsidian from Hrafntlnnuhryggur, Iceland ; its lithophysjp and sur- 
face markings 21, 32, 784 ; 26. 255-286 

— , Some effects of glacier action In Iceland by 21, 20, 717-730 

— ; Various forms and mutual relations of silica discussed by 24. 53 

— ; War-time development of the optical industry 30, 103 

— and Rankin, G. A. ; Physical-chemical system, llme-alumlna-sillea and 

Its geological significance 25, 92 

C. W., cited on recession of Muir glacier 21, 368 

— , Clement, J. K., and Aixen, E. T., Minerals of the composition MgSlO,, 

Reference to 21, 166 

Wright, G. F. ; Age of the Don River glacial deposits, Toronto, Ontario. 

26, 71, 205 

— cited on the Don and Scarboro beds of Ontario 26, 248 

— , Discussion of glacial formations In western United States by 28, 144 

local glaciers In Vermont by 28, 135 

— ; Evidence of a glacial dam In the Allegheny River between Warren, 

Pennsylvania, and Tlonesta 25, 84, 215 

— ; Explanation of the abandoned beaches about the south end of I^ke 

Michigan 29, 235 

elevated beaches surrounding the south end of Lake Michigan 

28, 142 

— , Pleistocene formations and "loess" discussed by 23, 48, 738 

— ; Post-Glaclal erosion and oxidation 23, 47, 277-296 



WRIGHT YATSU 323 

Page 

Wbight, G. F., Reference to his paper on the post-Glacial course of the 

Hudson River 22, 179 

— , Remarks on rock slide in Wind River Mountains of Wyoming 28, 149 

Wright, J., Dolomite 8pe<*lmen from quarry of 28, 439-440 

WvLiE, Herbert G., Acknowledj^nuent of assistance of 24, 254 

Wyoming, Amsden formation and its fauna of 28, 170 

in 29,309 

— , Coal-bearing formations in 25, 345 

— , Composition of allanite from 28, 481 

— , Conglomerate of 26, 346 

— , Continuity of marine sedimentation in 25, 345 

— , Cretaceous-Eocene correlation in 25, 355 

— , Early students of geologic formations of 24, 609 

— geologic formations, Geologic age of Bighorn dolomite 24, 609 

Wyoming-Idaho, Geologic map of Wayan quadrangle 27, 65 

Wyoming, Lance formation of 25, 348 

— , Laramie flora of southwestern 21, 75 

— , Mammal-bearing beds of 25, 325 

— , Mesaverde formation in 25, 345 

— , Natural bridge at Le Perle Creek 21. 320 

— , Notes on the Eocene of the Big Horn basin of 24. 113 

— , Oil fields of 28, 564, 571 

— , Origin of the Bighorn dolomite of 24, 607-624 

— , Precambrian rocks in 29, 97 

— , Red Beds of 27, 120 

southeastern 28, 168 

western 26, 61, 217-230 

— , Rock slide in Wind River Mountains 28, 149, 347 

— , Section of Morrison in 29. 252 

Y 

Yabe, H. ; Comparison of the Cretaceous faunas of Japan with those of 

western United States 26, 414 

— ; Triassic deposits of Japan 26, 413 

Yakutat Bay, Alaska, Map showing faults, u[)lifts, and depressions of 21, 360 
relation of mountain axes to earthquake origin in 21, 343 

— region, Earthquake of September, 1899 21, .339-406 

, Topography and geology of 21, 344 

— village, Alaska, Map of harbor of 21, 363 

Yaus expedition of 1912 ; R. S. Lull 24, 117 

— Museum, Accessions to exhibition series at 25, 143 

— University Museum and Art Museum open to visitors Sunday, Decem- 

ber 29, 1912 ' 24, .55 

Yasui, Kono; Evidence as to the mode of formations of coal derived 

from the deposits of Japan, China, and Manchuria 28, 1.30 

Yatsu, N., Notes on the histology of Linfjula anatina. Habits of the 

Japanese Lingula, Reference to 22 258 



.S24 J- STANLEY-BROWN INDKX TO VOLUMES 21 TO 30 

Page 

Yeates, W. S., (Jeolo«ical work in Georgia of 25, 174 

Yelix)\vstoxe natural bridj?o, Description of and view sljowinj?... 21,322,323 

— National Park, Alpp of 27, 13<S 

, Classification and conii)ositl«»n of thermal sprin;;s of 22. 114 

— , Natural bridire across lU'idj^e ( 'reek in 21, 322 

, Number of sprlnj^s in ■ 22. 114 

, Origin of the thcM-mal waters in the 22. 103 

, Radioactivity of thermal waters of 22, 121 

sprinj^s and jioysers, Development of 22, 118 

, Sunnnary of the orijrin of the thermal waters in the 22, 122 

thermal si)rin.i:s, (iases from 22, 117 

— Park rejficm, Climatic conditions of 22, 109 

, Lakes and bodies of water in 22, 110 

— , Periods of time in<licated in the 22, 104 

— River, Pleistocene valley of 27, 299. 300 

YosEMiTE region, Recent studies of 27, 46 

— valley, Cliff sculi»tnre of the 21. 20, 759 

, Tx^ssons of the little 22, 05, 730 

Young, S. W.. introduced by i\ V. Tolnum. .7r 26, 393 

— ; Some cheuiical factors affectin^c secondary suli»hide ore enriclnnent 26,393 
Y'ouxcjs, L. .L, Analysis of concretions by 25, 79 

— citwl on chenncal analysis table 27, 54 

Y'PBEsiAX and Sparnacian e(iuivalent to Wasatch 25, 396 

Yi'CATAN, Clinnitic chauKOs in 25, 539 

— , Geology of 29, 617 

YuccE.-E of the West Indies 29, 651 

YrKON- Alaska boundary between Y'^ukon and Porcupine rivers. Geolog- 
ical section along 24, 52. 678 

line, Geological section along the 25, 179 

— geological formations 23, 3,34 

— international boundary. Area of studies along 23, 334 

Yukon and Alaska, Differential erosion and equiplanation in i>ortious 

of 23, 333-345 

— plateau 23, 337 

z 

Zaccaona, D., cited on spheroidal diabase 25, 600 

Zaloziecki, R., cited on origin of oil 28, 729 

"Zapiirentis," Carl)oniferous spcM-ies of 29, 154 

— (jihsoni? Fossil of Wasatch region 21, 530 

Zeiixer, R., cited on Honduras fossils 29. 608 

Zeolites. Paragenesis of the 23, 37 

ZiEGiJCR, v., cited on oolites 25, 701, 762, 764 

Zinc deix)sits in Missouri, Genesis of 29, 86 

ZiRcoNiFEROus epidoslte.^ 27, 223 

ZiRKKi., Ferdinand, cited on Rlchthofens' hypothesis of chemical altera- 
tion 26, 256 



ZIRKEL ZW lERZ YCKI 325 

Page 

ZiRKEL, Ferdinand, cited on metamorphism 28> <^81 

— , Death announced of Corresiwndent 24, 10 

— ele(*ted Correspondent 21, 4 

— , Reference to work of 28, 736 

ZiTTLK, Karl, cited on eolian sands 21, 640 

Zones, New Mexico Gastropod, Tres Hermanos sandstone. Septa ria, and 

Cephalopod 23, 595 

— , Watkins Glen-Catatonk quadrangles fossiliferous 21, 287, 288 

Zoological nomenclature, Committee appointed on 22, 90 

, Resolution concerning '. 22, 90 

ZwiERZYCKi, J., cited on Tendaguru series 29, 264 



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